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  • seldom seen introduction
    that humans around the world use to express themselves What is a curator The word curator is derived from the Latin curare which means to take care of Museum curators do take care of objects that their institution holds but they also acquire new objects meet with donors to develop their collections research their current holdings and areas to acquire and collaborate with colleagues including exhibit designers educators and others to create exhibitions Curators also work with conservators to repair objects that have been damaged and to plan for proper storage of artifacts so that their collections will not deteriorate They write books and articles and give lectures How does one get to be a curator The professional training of individual curators varies and depends especially on the area of their focus Usually curators in art museums have studied art history and have focused on a particular area of interest either a time period an artist an art movement a specific culture or technology In this exhibition Collections Seldom Seen four curators Annie Carlano Curator of North American and European Collections Barbara Mauldin Curator of Latin American Collections Barbara Sumberg Curator of Textiles and Costumes and Tamara Tjardes Curator of

    Original URL path: http://www.internationalfolkart.org/eventsedu/education/seldomseen/cssintrocur.html (2016-02-12)
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  • Museum of International Folk Art | Exhibitions : Village of Painters Narrative Scrolls from West Bengal
    speak the truth is our vow Our work will be to establish the truth We shall follow the path trodden by great men and women We shall persuade men and women to act in a humane way to give up what is false in word and deed As the sunlight that shines in the daytime May we all become the light of goodness to everyone We shall honor those who

    Original URL path: http://www.internationalfolkart.org/exhibitions/past/patuas.html (2016-02-12)
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  • Museum of International Folk Art | Events & Education : Curricula
    world Throughout much of the twentieth century making quilts was considered a domestic responsibility for women in Gee s Bend As young girls many of the women trained or apprenticed in their craft with their mothers female relatives or friends other quilters however have been virtually self taught Women with large families often made dozens upon dozens of quilts over the course of their lives The women consider the process of piecing the quilt top to be highly personal In Gee s Bend the top the side that faces up on the bed is always pieced by a quilter working alone and reflects a singular artistic vision The subsequent process of quilting the quilt sewing together the completed top the batting stuffing and the back is sometimes then performed communally among small groups of women The women of Gee s Bend developed a distinctive bold and sophisticated quilting style based on traditional African American quilts but with a geometric simplicity reminiscent of Amish quilts and modern art Art critics worldwide have compared this geometric simplicity to the works of important artists such as Henri Matisse and Paul Klee The New York Times called the quilts some of the most miraculous

    Original URL path: http://www.internationalfolkart.org/eventsedu/education/geesbend/geesbendintro.html (2016-02-12)
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  • Events & Education : Curricula-Dream On Pop up Book Project
    their favorite dreams 2 Tell the students that they will be making their own three dimensional pop up dream book and that the part of the book that pops up will be the most important part of their dream They can use dreams that they have had as subject matter or make up a dream to illustrate Procedure 1 Hold up a prototype made by you of the sample of the type of pop up book that the class will make Explain that they will start by deciding what the background one of the big pieces of paper will be They can think of the background as the setting or scene for their dream 2 Students use markers pencils and decorative papers to create a background 3 Next they need to decide what they want to pop up It could be a human character a plant an animal an object or an imaginary shape Students draw their pop up element on the smaller piece of paper 4 Students cut the pop up element and apply color with pencil or markers or by gluing on decorative papers 5 To determine where to place the pop up and cut the tab fold the background in half Open it up fold it backwards and slide the pop up element along the folded edge until the student is happy with its location 6 Make two marks on the background with a pencil about an inch wide 7 Cut through both layers of the background creating a tab Fold the tab back and forth to let it know where to bend 8 Open up the background and push the tab forward Make a circle with a small piece of masking tape and apply it to the tab or the pop up element 9 Tape the

    Original URL path: http://www.internationalfolkart.org/eventsedu/education/exhibeduarchive/dreamonpopupbooksedu.html (2016-02-12)
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  • Events & Education : Curricula
    they look like What kinds of blankets do they have What kinds of pillows and blankets do they like 2 Talk about the difference between sleeping at home and other places hotel motels friends houses and tents What are the different types of arrangements in sleep furnishings that they are aware of 3 Some people put their mattresses on the floor In Asia people from all walks of life sleep on mats on the floor Often people use hard pillows to support their necks Why do students think that people from Asia sleep in mats on the floor and people from Europe sleep high on beds with mattresses and frames 4 Look at bedding textiles Ask students why they think that textiles are decorated What patterns do they like Do they have any special meaning 5 Explain that each student will be creating a resist painting and designing a bed of their dreams They can create an image of their bed at home or make up a new bed design based on the images they have seen and the discussion they have had Procedure 1 Explain that students are expected to use the whole page to design their bed They may want to include their entire bedroom in the picture windows curtains posters desks etc Explore how patterns and images are created by organizing different types of lines straight rounded smooth and bumpy just to name a few into designs and shapes Students draw their ideas in pencil on the paper 2 Discuss the use of craypas as the resist material Craypas are an oil based drawing material that will not absorb any water based paint like the watercolors they will be using Pressing hard with craypas will create the strongest resist while pressing lightly or using the side of

    Original URL path: http://www.internationalfolkart.org/eventsedu/education/exhibeduarchive/dreamonedudesignbed.html (2016-02-12)
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  • Museum of International Folk Art | Events & Education : Dream On Beds From Asia to Europe
    Dowling Half a Moon and One Whole Star by Cresent Dragonwagon Aunt Isabel Tells a Good One by Kate Duke Go Away Big Green Monster By Ed Emberly F G Time for Bed by Mem FoxG Good Night Sam by Marie Louise Gay Hush A Gaelic Lullabye by Carole Gerber Asleep Asleep by Mirra Ginsburg The Sun s Asleep Behind the Hill by Mirra Ginsburg Flora s Blanket by Debi Gliori Bernard s Nap by Elizabeth Goodman The Wind in the Willows by Kenneth Grahame H J All the Way to Morning by Marc Harshman 1 2 3 s to Learn and Keep and Lullabies for When You Sleep By Kenn Hayes Kiss Good Night by Amy Hest Jitterbug Jam by Jean Hicks The Sky is Not so Far Away by Margaret Hillert Bedtime for Frances by Russell Hoban Bedtime in the Southwest by Mona Hodgson Bedtime for Bears by Adelaide Holl Time for Bed by Susan Hood How Many Stars in the Sky by Lenny Hort Flashlight by Betsy James K Little People s Big Book About Bedtime by Neil Kagan A Hunting We Will Go by Steven Kellogg God is Bigger Than the Boogeyman by Cindy Kenney When Sheep Cannot Sleep by Satoshi Kitamura Hush Little Alien by Daniel Kirk No Such Thing by Jackie Koller L Little Bear Won t Go to Bed by Janna Langreuter My Bedtime by Jo Litchfield Once a Lullaby by Anita Lobel Froggy Goes to Bed by Jonathan London What Cried Granny An Almost Bedtime Story by Kate Lum Seven Scary Monsters by Mary Beth Lundgren M The Baby Beebee Bird by Diane Massie Nathaniel Willy Scared Silly by Judith Mathews My First Book of Nursery Tales by Marianna Mayer There s a Monster in My Closet by Mercer Mayer There s an Alligator Under My Bed by Mercer Mayer Just Go to Bed by Mercer Mayer I Just Forgot by Mercer Mayer Uncle Arthur s Bedtime Stories by Arthur S Maxwell Blueberries for Sal by Robert McCloskey There s a Dragon Downstairs by Hilary McKay It s Too Soon By Nigel McMullen En busca del beso by David Melling The Kiss That Missed by David Melling Go to Bed by Virginia Miller Winnie the Pooh by A A Milne Pooh s Bedtime Book by A A Milne Night America by Michael Montgomery Bedtime by Beni Montresor Sleep Tight Little Mouse by Mary Morgan Cookie Soup and Other Good Night Stories by Michaela Muntean What to Expect at Bedtime by Heidi Murkoff Mortimer by Robert Munsch 50 Below Zero by Robert Munsch N O P Night is Coming by W Nikola Lisa Pants Off First by Ruth Ohi Go Go Baby By Roxanne Orgill Dreamcatcher by Audrey Osofsky Goodnight Bear by Annie Owen Say Goodnight by Helen Oxenbury Junie B Jones has a Monster Under Her Bed by Barbara Park Lights Out By Lucille Penner R 10 Minutes Till Bedtime by Peggy Rathman Good Night Gorilla by Peggy Rathman Curious George s

    Original URL path: http://www.internationalfolkart.org/eventsedu/education/exhibeduarchive/dreamonedubooks.html (2016-02-12)
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  • Museum of International Folk Art, Santa Fe| Exhibitions : The Red That Colored the World
    Photo Colcha Embroidery Altar cloth detail Nina Arroyo Wood Santa Fe New Mexico 2013 Handspun New Mexico Churro wool with vegetal dyes and cochineal 15 x 451 4 Museum of International Folk Art IFAF Collection FA 2013 42 1 For significant financial support of The Red That Colored the World exhibition we extend special thanks to the following organizations and unnamed individuals as well National Endowment for the Humanities Exploring

    Original URL path: http://www.internationalfolkart.org/exhibitions/redsponsors.html (2016-02-12)
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  • Museum of International Folk Art | Events & Education : Curricula
    Rio Grande weavings Graves also stitched figurative images and used them as the main characters or subjects of her colcha The NEA honored her in 1994 Photo by William T Geiger George López 1900 1993 George López of Córdova New Mexico was a sixth generation wood carver and son of master santero José Dolóres López Although he began carving in 1925 George was fifty two before he became a full time carver of santos He is known for his many religious images as well as his intricately carved Trees of Life one of which was created from 395 individual pieces The NEA honored him in 1982 Photo by T Harmon Parkhurst Ramón José López 1951 Master artist Ramón José López of Santa Fe is a self taught artist in many of the New Mexican traditions including the art of the santero silversmithing and hide painting López has continued to use many carving tools that belonged to his santero grandfather who died two years before López was born The NEA honored him in 1997 Photo by Tom Pich Esther Martinez 1912 2006 Storyteller Esther Martinez of Ohkay Owingeh carried on the age old oral tradition of telling the folk tales of her Pueblo Martinez was also a linguist and a teacher who was a major conservator of the Tewa language She compiled Tewa dictionaries for each of the pueblos to reflect the distinct dialects and to preserve the various forms of their oral traditions The NEA honored her in 2006 Photo courtesy of the artist Roberto Lorenzo Martinez 1929 1954 Roberto Martínez is a musician singer and songwriter who also passed his knowledge and love of music down to his son Lorenzo who showed interest in the traditional songs of Northern New Mexico Together they perform traditional New Mexican music and also Mexican mariachi music with the ensemble Los Reyes de Albuquerque Created by Roberto in 1962 Los Reyes de Albuquerque have kept the music alive for future generations The NEA honored them in 2003 Photo courtesy of the artist Eliseo Paula Rodriguez 1915 2009 1915 2008 Well known revival artists in Straw appliqué and painting Eliseo and Paula Rodríguez are credited with being the first to incorporate figurative motifs into their straw appliqué Earlier forms of applicación de paja from the late 1700 s through the late 1800 s were decorated with geometric and floral or vine like elements Eliseo and Paula incorporated the saints and biblical scenes so that each piece told a story The NEA honored them in 2004 Emilio Senaida Romero 1910 1998 1909 2001 Emilio and Senaida both came from families with strengths in tinsmithing Senaida s family was also steeped in colcha embroidery Their marriage brought together the two crafts Together they created an entirely new style of tinwork that many contemporary artists rely upon today The Romeros elevated crafts that were considered solely utilitarian to a new aesthetic level which suited a new century as well as a new audience The NEA honored them

    Original URL path: http://www.internationalfolkart.org/eventsedu/education/centuryofmasters/artists.html (2016-02-12)
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