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  • Recycling in the Global Marketplace
    fill local markets where they are bought and sold Traditional craft skills leather working metallurgy and blacksmithing are cleverly adapted to fit the burgeoning recyclers trade Although the discarded raw materials are quintessentially modern the finished products often bear the imprint of age old style form and tradition In the centuries old city of Marrakech Morocco a narrow market street is piled high with the detritus of the modern age heaps of steel belted radials and other worn out tires With a sharp knife and a quick sleight of hand artisan recyclers ingeniously transform the black rubber rejects of the global automobile industry into fluidly sculpted pots water jugs animal gear and sandals for a local clientele These elegant water vessels are similar in size and shape to the more costly ones made from riveted copper In the port of Dakar Senegal a developing economy has created a market for hundreds of individuals who make do by finding new uses for broken or worn out products Assane Faye is one such recycling entrepreneur who makes and sells briefcases jewelry boxes trunks and toys cut from scavenged tin cans or misprinted metal sheeting from a local canning factory Mr Faye like

    Original URL path: http://www.internationalfolkart.org/exhibitions/past/recycledreseen/globalmarket/globalmarketpage.html (2016-02-12)
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  • Recycling for Fun and Profit
    of modern technology film projectors boom boxes even the latest war vehicles Whether made for fun or profit to resemble the old or mimic the new scrap toys appeal to the creative impulse in each of us If the symbols of Western mass media have penetrated the most remote corners of the globe their whimsical representation is not far behind Televisions boom boxes film projectors and still cameras are favorite subjects for the scrap toymaking set some of whose most admiring fans are Western collectors and visiting tourists In many parts of the world the United States included children play war games using either toy replicas of traditional weapons such as shields spears and arrows or models of contemporary combat In some cases these lifesized prototypes tanks helicopters machine guns and bombs are too familiar reminders of wartime events in the children s lives When American armed forces stationed themselves on the streets of Port au Prince Haiti in 1994 local boys entertained themselves for hours designing miniature replicas of their heroes impressive military vehicles From popular plastic soft drink containers they cut and painted pint sized copies of standard camouflaged tanks helicopters and military cars as well as more

    Original URL path: http://www.internationalfolkart.org/exhibitions/past/recycledreseen/toys/toyspage.html (2016-02-12)
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  • Recycling on the Body
    attract birds whose feathers are a prized form of wealth Thus the red in the label makes a handy substitute for the red feathers more traditionally used in such headdresses This is the kind of cross cultural recycling explored in this section when a person takes an object from another culture and gives it a new social life by wearing it on the body High up in the Andean mountains of central Ecuador costume makers engage in a form of recycling to produce ornate headdresses worn by dancers for the Catholic feast day of Corpus Christi Each headdress is elaborately decorated with a variety of Western maade objects such as light bulbs mirrors chrome car parts plastic toys zippers sunglasses and costume jewelry pieces In some cases the discarded industrial pieces retain the shape and symbolic significance of the more conventional Catholic images which preceded them Other pieces translate the headdresses earlier baroque style with its shiny gold silver and stone studded ornamentation into modern day equivalents such as costume jewelry pieces watch bands silver coins and reflective mirrors These contemporary motifs appeal to the young Indian and mestizo dancers who wear the headdresses in the annual processions Buttons zippers

    Original URL path: http://www.internationalfolkart.org/exhibitions/past/recycledreseen/body/bodypage.html (2016-02-12)
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  • Recycled Chic
    one of our nation s most exclusive dress designers recently unveiled a spring fashion line that featured sequins made from recycled beverage cans As if to accentuate the ironies and opportunities of global recycling the Mizrahi Company chronicled this line s complicated production cycle first the cans were collected by the homeless of New York City and flattened by immigrant groups in New Jersey They were next shipped to Paris where the pailettes sequins were cut Finally the pailettes and the silk fabric pieces cut in New York were shipped to India where seamstresses sewed them to the fabric Lee Carter is an American designer and wholesaler of a complete line of recycled specialty objects The designs for his products are based on traditional folk Catholic tinwork in Mexico nichos reliquaries and frames but with a contemporary twist that appeals to his hip trans national clientele Namely the tin is recycled from discarded beer fruit battery and vegetable cans with the product labels showing as a conscious stylistic design While Lee dictates the designs and dimensions the objects themselves are fabricated in central Mexico by the Granados family traditional tinsmiths from the town of San Miguel de Allende Once produced

    Original URL path: http://www.internationalfolkart.org/exhibitions/past/recycledreseen/chic/chicpage.html (2016-02-12)
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  • All-American Art of Conspicuous Recycling
    housewifery in the 19th and early 20th centuries and quilts have come to symbolize that thrift But even when making do is not a necessity it remains a challenge and an artistic adventure Sometimes quilters play with the idea of incorporating industrially produced items into the design The use of cornmeal or tobacco sacks bank coin bags men s overalls and blue jean bockets all speak to the quilters ability to challence necessity with wit and ingenuity Junk carries with it the suggestion of other lives and the memories associated with its prior use whether real or imagined Many of the things shown here were made as gifts and as whimsies intended to decorate the home The serve as conversation pieces and as affectionate reminders of the gift giver Now they evoke a certain nostalgia for by gone days and pre industrial ways though the materials employed are all factory made Some recyclers take a particularly bold approach to their work creating large scale sculptures or even whole environments in their yards These artists mainly scavenge their raw materials from dumps and roadsides finding beauty and rich possibilities in the cast offs of our consumer culture Some work within clearly defined community traditions and others do not All of them cleverly use recycled junk to create compelling works of art that validate their individuality or community It all started as a dare could his fishing buddies drink enough beer to make a pop top chain long enough to stretch to the carport They did the chain grew into a whole environment and Ray Cyrek 1930 1995 found his passion Ray a crusty retiree who lived in Homosassas Springs Florida once owned a junkyard He also collected aluminum cans to recycle as supplement to his retirement income and pop tops were

    Original URL path: http://www.internationalfolkart.org/exhibitions/past/recycledreseen/american/americanpage.html (2016-02-12)
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  • International Folk Arts Week July 4-12, 2010
    July 7 2010 7 30PM A benefit for the Santa Fe International Folk Art Market The Lensic Performing Arts Center An Evening with Nicholas Kristof Pulitzer Prize winning New York Times columnist and author of Half the Sky Turning Oppression Into Opportunity for Women Worldwide Ticket prices are 15 00 for balcony seats 25 00 for general seating 40 00 for preferred seating 15 is tax deductible The 125 00 ticket 75 is tax deductible includes prime seating a private reception at Coyote Cantina with Nicholas Kristof and a signed copy of Half the Sky Tickets on sale April 1st at the Lensic box office online at 988 1234 or online at www ticketssantafe org Thursday July 8 2010 8 30 10AM Breakfast with the Curator Africa Museum of International Folk Art Tour MOIFA Collections with Dr Bobbie Sumberg Curator of Textiles and Costume and African Artists Co op Representative 20 for members 25 for nonmember nonrefundable Call 505 476 1207 for information and reservations Thursday July 8 2010 6 30 8pm Folk Art Market Kick off Concert Artist Procession Downtown Santa Fe on the Plaza Meet 170 master folk artists participating in the 2010 Santa Fe International Folk Art Market Live music from Cuba by TradiSon and others scheduled to perform at this year s market FREE July 9 11 2010 Parking lots are tented NO PARKING ZONES ENFORCED Use FREE Park and Ride Shuttles Advance tickets available at all Museum of New Mexico Foundation Gift Shops Los Alamos National Bank locations and the National Hispanic Cultural Center in Albuquerque and on line Santa Fe International Folk Art Market To purchase tickets by phone within the 505 area code call 983 1060 toll free long distance call 888 670 3655 Park Ride Shuttles at TWO locations click map images to enlarge New Mexico State Capitol Old Santa Fe Trail Paseo de Peralta OR Department of Transportation at Cordova Cerrillos Roads Friday July 9 2010 6 30 to 9 00 Opening Party with Dancing and Shopping Under the Stars Artist booths will be open lighted and ready for sales Tickets are 125 00 per person 75 00 of the ticket price is tax deductible Advance tickets available at all Museum of New Mexico Foundation Gift Shops Los Alamos National Bank locations and the National Hispanic Cultural Center in Albuquerque and on line Santa Fe International Folk Art Market To purchase tickets by phone within the 505 area code call 983 1060 toll free long distance call 888 670 3655 Photo above 2008 Folk Art Market Photo Bob Smith A Polished Eye Saturday July 10 2010 Santa Fe International Folk Art Market Saturday July 10 2010 Early Bird 7 30 to 9 a m Tickets are 50 00 and include all day Saturday Market admission Advance tickets available at all Museum of New Mexico Foundation Gift Shops Los Alamos National Bank locations and the National Hispanic Cultural Center in Albuquerque and on line Santa Fe International Folk Art Market To purchase

    Original URL path: http://www.internationalfolkart.org/eventsedu/ifam/PastIFAM/2010internationalfolkartsweek.html (2016-02-12)
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  • 2009 Santa Fe International Folk Art Market Entertainment Schedule
    11 00AM Aswan Folk Troupe pending confirmation Egyptian music dance 11 20AM to 12 20PM Los Primos Mariachi and Trio Romantico 1 00 to 2 30PM Bobi Céspedes Afro Cuban folkloric music 3 00 to 4 30PM Le Chat Lunatique Gypsy jazz Sunday July 12 2009 10 30 to 11 15AM Gamelan Selonding Balinese traditional gamelan music 11 30AM to 12 15PM Aswan Folk Troupe pending confirmation Egyptian music and

    Original URL path: http://www.internationalfolkart.org/eventsedu/ifam/PastIFAM/2009entertainment.html (2016-02-12)
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  • Education Events Santa Fe International Folk Art Market 2009
    12 00 Balla Kouyaté is a master balafon player from the djeli or griot a wandering folklore musician tradition in Mali Experience an engaging demonstration of this powerful and percussive yet melodic music performed by the best All ages and skill levels welcome comfortable clothing and shoes recommended 3 00 to 4 00PM Bobi Céspedes Afro Cuban Folkloric Tradition Through Rhythm and Song Museum of International Folk Art auditorium Sacred

    Original URL path: http://www.internationalfolkart.org/eventsedu/ifam/PastIFAM/2009education.html (2016-02-12)
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