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  • Cerámica y Cultura ~ Origins of Mayólica
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    Original URL path: http://www.internationalfolkart.org/mayolica/origins/imagegallery-en.html (2016-02-12)
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  • Cerámica y Cultura ~ Styles
    different materials and new methods that revolutionized pottery production in Spain As a result their influence was far reaching Even after the expulsion of the Muslims in the 16th and 17th centuries many potters continued to use the motifs and colors copper green and manganese purple black that were so prominent in Islamic pottery A number of towns such as Teruel had established their reputation on and continued to produce

    Original URL path: http://www.internationalfolkart.org/mayolica/style/spain-en.html (2016-02-12)
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  • Cerámica y Cultura ~ Styles
    archaeological excavations and guild regulations indicate that both cities produced numerous styles of mayólica throughout the 16th and 17th centuries it is Puebla that became recognized for the quality of its ceramics Guild regulations of the 17th century specified three types of pottery yellow ware loza amarilla for cooking common ware or tableware loza común and fine ware loza fina Most of what survives today in museum collections is loza

    Original URL path: http://www.internationalfolkart.org/mayolica/style/mexico-en.html (2016-02-12)
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  • Cerámica y Cultura ~ Style
    Click on any image below to view details Styles of Spain Styles of Mexico

    Original URL path: http://www.internationalfolkart.org/mayolica/style/stylesimagegal-en.html (2016-02-12)
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  • Cerámica y Cultura ~ Daily Life
    were based on Arab pharmacies The shape of the jars is said to be based on the bamboo sections in which Arab pharmaceutics were shipped Typically they were covered with a piece of cloth or parchment Apothecary jars in Spain often had the name permanently marked on the vessel Those in Mexico may have had a label pasted on the jar or covering Herbs medicinal plants as well as spices

    Original URL path: http://www.internationalfolkart.org/mayolica/dailylife/apothecary-en.html (2016-02-12)
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  • Cerámica y Cultura ~ Daily Life
    daily life were the trade tiles or oficios depicting people in various occupations These were often created as advertisements for businesses and were comprehensible to a largely illiterate population Plates and pots were also vehicles for depicting everyday activities and clothing sometimes expressing political statements and satire Seventeenth and 18th century examples from Mexico were dominated by motifs and characters derived from Chinese porcelains but in the 19th century Spanish

    Original URL path: http://www.internationalfolkart.org/mayolica/dailylife/depictions-en.html (2016-02-12)
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  • Cerámica y Cultura ~ Daily Life
    long been used in the Americas to make a beverage that was typically served unheated unsweetened and sometimes spiced with chile The native Mexican Indians believed it to have spiritual qualities and the valuable beans were also used as money Aristocratic Europeans initially rejected this bitter drink In time however by heating the chocolate and mixing it with cinnamon vanilla and sugar cane they created a beverage that by the

    Original URL path: http://www.internationalfolkart.org/mayolica/dailylife/chocolate-en.html (2016-02-12)
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  • Cerámica y Cultura ~ Daily Life
    leather hangings guadamaciles Once again tile began to invade all parts of a building as it had in Islamic Spain only now the decoration was not geometric and floral but figurative Entire walls of palaces and grand homes were covered in pictorial tilework illustrating scenes of domestic and courtly life themes that were also popularized in the French and Spanish paintings of Watteau Boucher and Goya Interior walls depicted domestic

    Original URL path: http://www.internationalfolkart.org/mayolica/dailylife/spanishkitchen-en.html (2016-02-12)
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