archive-org.com » ORG » I » INTERNATIONALFOLKART.ORG

Total: 418

Choose link from "Titles, links and description words view":

Or switch to "Titles and links view".
  • Cerámica y Cultura ~ Daily Life
    in the construction of mission establishments that included churches monasteries schools for Indian converts and kitchens These self sufficient kitchen complexes included a vegetable garden orchard cistern aqueduct cold room kitchen bakery and refectory Most Mexican kitchens undoubtedly made use of a mixture of utensils from Spain and Mexico such as the Mexican grinding stone metate as well as the European mortar and pestle Mayólica imported from Spain was probably

    Original URL path: http://www.internationalfolkart.org/mayolica/dailylife/mexicankitchen-en.html (2016-02-12)
    Open archived version from archive


  • Cerámica y Cultura ~ Daily Life
    been able to acquire Mayólica was used for dining along with other ceramics from Spain France England or China These were combined with items of silver that might have been handed down in the family and pewter an inexpensive metal that was locally manufactured Salt cellars were often a prominent part of the table setting In Medieval Spain salt cellars were the first vessels to be set upon the table

    Original URL path: http://www.internationalfolkart.org/mayolica/dailylife/mexicantable-en.html (2016-02-12)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Cerámica y Cultura ~ Daily Life
    every function in the Spanish and Mexican household Inkwells flower pots chamber pots and barber bowls were among the items that were formed on the potter s wheel Many of these pieces were based on metal or wooden prototypes Mayólica proved to be less expensive than metal more durable than wood and more colorful than either The status associated with mayólica is evident in its inclusion in many portraits and

    Original URL path: http://www.internationalfolkart.org/mayolica/dailylife/household-en.html (2016-02-12)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Cerámica y Cultura ~ Daily Life
    the 1500s Phillip II commissioned over 9000 tiles for the monastery of his palace the Escorial Table ware was also commissioned for the Escorial bearing the coat of arms of the Hieronymites the order of the monks who ran the monastery Religious patronage continued in Mexico where hundreds of mayólica vessels were produced to handle the food storage and dining of the many cloistered orders of nuns and friars as

    Original URL path: http://www.internationalfolkart.org/mayolica/dailylife/religious-en.html (2016-02-12)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Cerámica y Cultura ~ Daily Life
    Click on any image below to view details Apothecary Depictions of Daily Life Chocolate The Spanish Kitchen The Mexican Kitchen Mexican Table Household Objects Religious Life

    Original URL path: http://www.internationalfolkart.org/mayolica/dailylife/dailyimagegal-en.html (2016-02-12)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Cerámica y Cultura ~ The Traditional Potter's Workshop
    the kilns a painting area more storage for completed items sales and packing areas and living quarters This floor plan is derived from early Islamic potteries in Spain The numbers in the drawings correspond as follows 1 clay storage 2 well 3 grinding wheels 4 ground clay pits 5 water tank 6 soaking backs 7 wet clay drying floor 8 prepared clay 9 wedging table 10 potter s wheels 11

    Original URL path: http://www.internationalfolkart.org/mayolica/traditional/diagram-en.html (2016-02-12)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Cerámica y Cultura ~ The Traditional Potter's Workshop
    traditional mayólica making process using footage taken in 2001 and 2002 of workshops in Spain and Mexico Watch Quicktime Video 4MB slower connection 9MB faster connection or Watch Windows WMV

    Original URL path: http://www.internationalfolkart.org/mayolica/traditional/technique-en.html (2016-02-12)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Cerámica y Cultura ~ Contemporary Showcase
    in 1849 to revive mayólica production in Talavera which had been closed for several decades They hope to put together a small museum in their taller with their collection of historic pieces and drawings to encourage interest in this local artistic patrimony Santa Catalina Cerámica Regional Pedro de la Cal Rubio D 2000 Owner Santa Catalina Cerámica Regional Puente del Arzobispo Spain Photo by Robin Farwell Gavin 2000 Pedro de

    Original URL path: http://www.internationalfolkart.org/mayolica/contemporary/spain-en.html (2016-02-12)
    Open archived version from archive



  •