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  • Museum of International Folk Art | Events & Education : Curricula| Century of Masters |vocabulary
    native wool yarn on wool or cotton backing hide painting painting on the tanned hide of a buffalo or cow retablo image of a saint created by a santero usually painted on a wooden board santero an artisan who makes images of saints in 2 or 3 dimensions silversmith an artisan who works with silver storyteller a person who tells stories straw appliqué the practice of using cut pieces of

    Original URL path: http://www.internationalfolkart.org/eventsedu/education/centuryofmasters/vocabulary.html (2016-02-12)
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  • Museum of International Folk Art | Events & Education : Curricula-Material World
    valuable textiles that you own What are the least valuable Why Home Textiles are essential in any dwelling whether it s a nomadic tent a timber frame house or a tiled palace They provide comfort and warmth to the inhabitants as well as a canvas for the skill of their makers Textiles are used on the floor and on the table They are also used to serve food to pad hard furniture to warm the walls to protect other items from dirt and dust and to decorate In some dwellings textiles soften the hard surfaces of wood plaster and tile In others textiles are the dwelling itself The woven goat hair tent has been used all over Central Asia Turkey and the Middle East for people who follow the grass for their livestock Inside the ground is covered with hardwearing cloth spun and woven from fiber produced by the family s flock Quilts and pillows are stacked for use at night woven bags hold the household s possessions and cloth covers the bags to keep out the dirt All these are made by the women of the family whose weaving skills are on display to anyone who enters the tent

    Original URL path: http://www.internationalfolkart.org/eventsedu/education/materialworld/home_dress.html (2016-02-12)
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  • Museum of International Folk Art | Events & Education : Curricula-Material World
    you have cloth curtains or shades cloth towels sheets and blankets How are the textiles in your home decorated What colors are they Has anyone spent the night in a tent or a teepee How is sleeping inside of fabric different than sleeping in another type of house structure Dress is a nonverbal form of communication From the full length mink coat of a wealthy New Yorker to the non leather shoes of an adamant vegan what we wear tells the world something about who we are or would like to be Dress is a universal expression of belonging and boundaries including and excluding at the same time What is unique is how cultural groups have developed styles and techniques that reflect their specific situations Individuals within a culture take those techniques and styles and make something distinctive by following or breaking the rules Photo Blouse halili petondu cotton bark mica embroidered appliquéd 20th century Sulawesi Indonesia To Kaili group International Folk Art Foundation Stars and diamonds dominate the surface of this woman s blouse made from commercially woven cotton fabric lined with bark cloth The mica was procured locally its sole use to decorate clothing These blouses were worn by women for ceremonial occasions Photo by Addison Doty The oldest textile tool is the needle Long before anyone invented weaving people sewed animal skins together to make clothing and shelter According to recent research humans first began tailoring clothing about 100 000 years ago Human history has since been a very long fashion parade with a large share of the world s time and energy going to dressing its population By simply looking at pieces of material culture textiles and dress included we can admire their visual qualities and the technical skill demonstrated by the maker But without further

    Original URL path: http://www.internationalfolkart.org/eventsedu/education/materialworld/home_dress_2.html (2016-02-12)
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  • Museum of International Folk Art | Events & Education : Curricula-Material World
    of a so called uniform When an old man or woman dies the family gets together and as part of the planning picks a design of printed cloth as the commemorative cloth Friends and family members can then purchase the designated cloth in the market and have it tailored into a garment that is worn to the funeral When the same garment is worn afterward for any occasion the wearer recalls the deceased and his feelings for him or her The same practice is customary among a group of female friends when a child is born Other words that are appropriate for things in this category are sacred special occasion magical ritual and religious Photo Pilgrimage Vest cotton stamped c 1900 Japan Gift of Ralph C Altman Vests and jackets were worn by people making pilgrimages to shrines and temples in Japan When a temple was visited the garment was stamped Photo by Addison Doty Questions for Discussion What are the important rites of passage in your community Birth Circumcision Baptism Communion Quinciñera Marriage Death etc What types of clothing do people wear during those occasions What are special holidays that are celebrated in your community Halloween Día de Muertos

    Original URL path: http://www.internationalfolkart.org/eventsedu/education/materialworld/ceremonial_dress.html (2016-02-12)
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  • Museum of International Folk Art | Events & Education : Curricula-Material World
    of clothing suitable for a formal occasion dwelling a shelter in which people live fashion to give shape or form to a prevailing style or mode gender sex as in male or female behaviors associated with one gender or another nomadic roaming from place to place not having a fixed home pattern a grouping of shapes forms objects concepts or behaviors that repeats textiles anything made by people from fibrous

    Original URL path: http://www.internationalfolkart.org/eventsedu/education/materialworld/vocabulary.html (2016-02-12)
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  • Museum of International Folk Art | Events & Education : Curricula-Material World
    pieces approximately 18 x 22 For very young children you may want to pre cut a slit or a hole for the head fabric scraps pencils or markers scissors glue glue brushes feathers sequins pompoms beads jewels button metallic foil or paper ribbon bells Motivation Show the students pictures of people wearing capes and ponchos some for protection from the elements and some during celebrations such as Mardi Gras Pueblo dances or other celebrations Students will inevitably bring up super heroes and figures such as Superman and Batman You can discuss the way that capes cover and protect and also the way that they can become part of a costume Ask the students to imagine a cape that they would want to wear and explain that they will make their own Procedure 1 Have each student select one big piece of fabric to use for their cape as well as smaller fabric scraps to use to decorate it 2 Students can draw the shapes they would like to cut out on the fabric scraps 3 When the fabric scraps have been cut out use glue brushes to spread the glue to the edges of the cut out fabric scraps and

    Original URL path: http://www.internationalfolkart.org/eventsedu/education/materialworld/capes.html (2016-02-12)
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  • Museum of International Folk Art | Events & Education : Curricula-Material World
    or cardboard Motivation Show image s of toran and explain that they are used to welcome human and divine visitors to the home You can discuss the different ways that people welcome visitors such as welcome mats mezuzah turning on exterior lights special greetings etc Toran are also used for protection as amulets or good luck charms inside the home as well as outside and you can talk about why people would want to use a decoration as a form of protection Tell the students that they will be making their own welcome banners and that they can think about the types of fabric they would like to use and how they would like to decorate them They can think of symbols to use or messages to write on their banners Procedure 1 Each student selects one large approx 9 x 12 piece of fabric for the background of their banner and several smaller pieces of fabric to use to decorate the larger piece 2 Before the students decorate their banners have them attach either a piece of string or a thin stick or dowel to the large piece of fabric Turn the fabric so that the wrong side is facing up Lay the dowel or string parallel to and about an inch from the top edge Apply glue to the top edge of the fabric Fold the fabric over the string or glue and press to adhere it Turn the banner over and proceed 3 Students draw shapes in pencil or marker on the smaller pieces of fabric and then cut them out 4 Then they arrange and glue the smaller fabric shapes onto the background piece using glue brushes to spread the glue to the edges of the small fabric pieces so that they adhere well 5 Student

    Original URL path: http://www.internationalfolkart.org/eventsedu/education/materialworld/appliquewelcomebanners.html (2016-02-12)
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  • Museum of International Folk Art | Events & Education : Curricula-Material World
    1985 Morris Ann Hats Hats Hats New York Lothrop Lee Shepard Books 1989 Kalman Bobbie Homes Around the World New York Crabtree Publishing Company 1994 Kelly Kevin Erin Jaeb Sleep on It Chicago Children s Press 1995 Komatsu Yoshio Wonderful Houses Around the World www shelterpub com Mills Lauren The Rag Coat New York Little Brown Company 1991 Nordqvist Sven The Hat Hunt Stockholm R S Books 1987 Polacco Patricia The Keeping Quil t New York Simon Schuster 1988 Sola Michele Angela Weaves a Dream New York Hyperion Books for Children 1997 Stroud Bettye The Patchwork Path Cambridge Massachusetts Candlewick Press 2005 Tafolla Carmen What Can You Do with a Rebozo Berkeley California Tricycle Press 2008 Adult Books Arnett Paul Joanne Cubbs Eugene Metcalf Jr eds Gee s Bend The Architecture of the Quilt Atlanta Tinwood Press 2006 Burnham Dorothy Cut my Cote Toronto Canada Royal Ontario Museum 1973 Carlano Annie Bobbie Sumberg Sleeping Around The Bed from Antiquity to Now Santa Fe New Mexico Museum of International Folk Art with the University of Washington Press 2006 Donovan Nancy Jill Last Ethiopian Costumes Addis Ababa Ethiopia Ethiopian Tourism Commission 1991 Fisher Nora ed Rio Grande Textiles Santa Fe New Mexico

    Original URL path: http://www.internationalfolkart.org/eventsedu/education/materialworld/bibliography.html (2016-02-12)
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