archive-org.com » ORG » I » INTERNATIONALFOLKART.ORG

Total: 418

Choose link from "Titles, links and description words view":

Or switch to "Titles and links view".
  • Museum of International Folk Art | Events & Education : Curricula-Needles & Pins: Textiles and Tools-Weaving
    than is possible on a smaller loom The history of the floor loom from its murky origins to all the complex developments including the Chinese and Syrian draw looms the flying shuttle and the jacquard loom that contributed to the mechanized and computerized looms used today to produce all kinds of fabrics is fascinating and far too lengthy to delve into here Male weavers in West Africa use a unique loom Although it has treadles like a floor loom it is portable and small making a strip only as wide as the beater and usually no more than 4 5 inches wide The loom is set up every day in a small roofed shed The heddle pulley is attached to a beam and the treadles are attached to the heddles by a cord When the weaver is finished he rolls the loom and the weaving into a compact bundle and brings it inside Vertical looms were used in the ancient world and today are used in Nigeria North Africa Southwest United States Turkey and many other places to weave a wider cloth and carpets There are no treadles and the weaver sits on the ground or a low chair to weave In central Africa a small vertical loom is used to weave raphia fiber obtained from the leaf of the raphia palm The European high warp tapestry loom is a variation of the vertical loom The stunning designs and high quality of the work produced in northern Europe from the 14th 18th centuries offer ample proof that the skill of the weaver is more important than the level of the technology used to produce a work of art Tapestry is a weave as well as a product Navajo and Rio Grande rugs and blankets are woven in tapestry technique as

    Original URL path: http://www.internationalfolkart.org/eventsedu/education/needlesandpins/weaving.html (2016-02-12)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Museum of International Folk Art | Events & Education : Curricula-Needles & Pins: Textiles and Tools
    select a few strands of yarn and thread the yarn over and under sequentially each warp thread They can leave a little tail at the end and use the under over pattern to secure it When they get to the end of a row instruct them to reverse the pattern in the next row going over when they went under before Continue the pattern until the thread runs out and then they can add another color 3 Guide the students to weave with a tension that is not too tight by encouraging them to make a hill with their yarn as they weave and then pushing it down to meet the other strands 4 When the looms are almost full of weavings gather the students to explain that they will be tying the warp threads to keep the weaving together as well as make fringe You can explain that the warp threads are like the bones of the weaving 5 Turn the looms on the back and have the students snip two adjacent warp threads in the middle of each thread at a time starting on one end Turn the loom onto the right side where the weaving is and knot the warp threads twice right next to the weaving Continue cutting and tying pairs of warp threads until an entire edge is tied 6 Tie the other edge 7 Students can trim the fringe but encourage them to cut some distance away from the knots so that they don t untie Evaluation Arrange a display of the weavings Have students discuss the colors and patterns that their classmates used Have the students imagine that their weavings are life size How have they been used What is their history They can write stories about where the weavings have been and

    Original URL path: http://www.internationalfolkart.org/eventsedu/education/needlesandpins/weavingproject.html (2016-02-12)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Museum of International Folk Art | Events & Education : Curricula-Needles & Pins: Textiles and Tools-Printing and painting
    adire and stencil patterns from Nigeria and drawn and stencil patterns from Japan use this technique The tjanting and tjegul are batik tools that originated in Indonesia Brushes feathers combs and other implements have been used to create resist patterns In India and Iran another method is used whereby mordants the chemical agents that create the bond between fiber and dye are applied to the undyed cloth either by printing or painting with a brush or pen When the cloth is immersed in the dye bath the areas with mordant take on color while the rest of the fabric remains undyed In India the resulting fabric is called kalamkari meaning pen work In Iran it is known as qalamkar Adinkra cloth is a stamped fabric that is made in Ghana Africa Symbolic motifs which represent proverbs are carved from calabashes a type of gourd and are dipped into a black dye made from the bark of the badie tree Adinkra artists divide the fabric into squares and then create patterns and repetitive designs using the inked stamps When it is used for funerary or ceremonial occasions the cloth is yellow or red However the stamped designs are always printed in

    Original URL path: http://www.internationalfolkart.org/eventsedu/education/needlesandpins/printingandpainting.html (2016-02-12)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Museum of International Folk Art | Events & Education : Curricula-Needles & Pins: Textiles and Tools banner project
    elements that are repeated What do the symbols remind them of If the students had to assign the symbols meaning what would the significance of the symbols be Explain the traditional use of adinkra cloth and the way that the stamps each have a meaning and often a proverb associated with it Tell the students that they will be making their own adinkra banners and encourage them to use shapes and or invent symbols that have meaning for them They can think about values that are important to them ideals that they have issues for world leaders to keep in mind and philosophies they hold dear Procedure 1 Each students gets a piece of craft foam and draws their idea for their symbol on the paper back Because they are drawing on the back they do not have to reverse the image 2 The students cut out the foam and adhere the pieces to the railroad board 3 When they are ready to print they place their adinkra stamp with the foam side up on a stack of newspapers They roll the brayer in the ink and apply it to the surface of the foam 4 When they are ready to lay the fabric on top of the inked foam make sure any excess ink has been removed from the surrounding newspaper just throw it away 5 Place the fabric on top of the inked foam and rub gently without changing the placement of the fabric 6 Peel off the fabric and enjoy the results 7 Repeat as desired 8 Determine where on the dowel the cloth is going to be placed Mark each edge with a pencil Apply glue stick to the dowel in the designated area 9 Place the fabric on top of the glued dowel and press

    Original URL path: http://www.internationalfolkart.org/eventsedu/education/needlesandpins/bannerproject.html (2016-02-12)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Museum of International Folk Art | Events & Education : Curricula-Needles & Pins: Textiles and Tools-Adinkra banner bibliogrpahy
    Royal Arts of Africa the Majesty of Form Upper Saddle River NJ Prentice Hall 1998 Gillow John Printed and Dyed Textiles from Africa Seattle University of Washington Press 2001 Gillow John Bryan Sentence World Textiles A Visual Guide to Traditional Techniques London Thames Hudson 1999 Horn Diane African Printed Textile Design Owings Mill MD Stemmer House Publishing Inc 1998 Owusu Heiki Symbols of Africa New York Sterling Publishing Co Inc

    Original URL path: http://www.internationalfolkart.org/eventsedu/education/needlesandpins/andinkrabibliography.html (2016-02-12)
    Open archived version from archive

  • linguistic staff project
    elephant referred to a traditional proverb The bush cow says that if the elephant is not around the bush cow is the mountain In other words when a more important person is absent the lesser person thinks of himself or herself as great You may want to share with your students these additional African symbols and the sayings associated with them Scorpion The scorpion exists in thunder Persevere in the face of difficulty Key If I lock it nobody can open it A message from parents to children meaning the parent has the final say Chameleon The world is a chameleon s skin A warning to someone of great wealth of thinks he or she will never lose it How to make a Linguist Staff Objectives 1 Students will understand how linguist staffs were used in African culture historical and cultural understanding 2 Students will learn about the materials methods and techniques used to create linguist staffs perceiving analyzing and responding 3 Students will find their own solutions in the process of creating a linguist staff by exploring materials and forms to express their ideas creating and performing New Mexico Content Standards Arts 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 Social Studies 1 4 5 6 11 Materials Sticks dowels or broom handles clay ball 3 4 inches in diameter for each student yellow or gold tempera or acrylic paint optional Motivation 1 Discuss the way that leaders present themselves to the public Look at images of world leaders and analyze what they wear and what they carry 2 Look at images of linguist staffs and or discuss the way that they have been used Sometimes the decorations on top of the staffs were used as decorative motifs on clothing as well 3 Have the students read the proverbs

    Original URL path: http://www.internationalfolkart.org/eventsedu/education/handmadeplanet/linguisticstaffs.html (2016-02-12)
    Open archived version from archive

  • bibliography Handmade Planet
    Low Books Inc 1996 Ehlert Lois Market Day San Diego Harcourt Inc 2000 Kalman Bobbie Homes Around the World New York Crabtree Publishing Company 1994 Morris Ann Loving New York Lothrop Lee Shepard Books 1990 On the Go New York Lothrop Lee Shepard Books 1990 Seth Laurel and Ree Mobley eds Folk Art Journey Florence D Bartlett and the Museum of International Folk Art Santa Fe NM Museum of New

    Original URL path: http://www.internationalfolkart.org/eventsedu/education/handmadeplanet/bibliography.html (2016-02-12)
    Open archived version from archive

  • vocabulary handmade planet
    to create exhibitions designer one who creates and often executes a plan for a project folk art a work of art made by a person who is part of an ongoing cultural community as a manner of carrying on a tradition founder one who establishes something interdependent in the midst of relying upon each other for support international reaching beyond national boundaries handmade made by hand or a hand process

    Original URL path: http://www.internationalfolkart.org/eventsedu/education/handmadeplanet/vocabulary.html (2016-02-12)
    Open archived version from archive



  •