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  • Selsom Seen: printmaking project
    different textures Have them compare their results They can make collages of the textures to display 3 Explain that woodblock printing uses raised textures to make pictures 4 Look at images of woodblock prints and pass around a used woodblock or linoleum block if one is available Discuss the use of positive and negative space in creating a block for printing 5 If a used printing block is available roll it up with ink and make a print from it 6 Tell the students that they will be creating plates to make prints off of They can draw a picture make a design or write a message Anything written comes out backwards unless the letters and words are written in reverse originally Procedure 1 Using water soluble markers draw ideas for the print on the styrofoam plates using light pressure Mistakes can be erased with a damp sponge 2 Use a sharpened pencil or a ballpoint pen to engrave their drawing into the styrofoam 3 Roll out the printing ink onto a cookie sheet using a brayer 4 Place the styrofoam with the engraved design facing up on a stack of newspaper pages Roll the ink onto the styrofoam 5 Place a piece of paper on top of the inked styrofoam and rub 6 Lift off the paper and admire 7 Repeat as many times as materials and time allow Evaluation Display the prints on a bulletin board with descriptive labels made by the students Have a workshop day where your students teach other classes how to make relief prints Have a print swap after many students have created prints Curricular Connections Visual Art Come up with a theme a topic a person to celebrate or a design problem to solve Have each student make a print that addresses the

    Original URL path: http://www.internationalfolkart.org/eventsedu/education/seldomseen/resourcesprintmaking.html (2016-02-12)
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  • Selsom Seen| Bibliography & Resources
    String the Brazilian Literatura de Cordel Berkeley CA University of California Press 1982 Thompson Amanda Ceramicá Mexican Pottery of the 20th Century Atglen PA Schiffer Publishing Ltd 2001 Asia All Japan Handmade Washi Association Handbook on the Art of Washi Tokyo Japan All Japan Handmade Washi Association 1991 Baten Lea Japanese Folk Toys The Playful Arts Tokyo Japan Shufunotomo Co Ltd 1992 Playthings and Pastimes in Japanese Prints New York New York Tokyo Japan Weatherhill Inc and Shufunotomo Co Ltd 1995 Brandon Reiko Mochinaga Country Textiles of Japan the Art of Tsutsugaki Honolulu Hawaii Honolulu Academy of Arts 1986 Kuo Susanna Campbell Carved Paper The Art of the Japanese Stencil New York New York Tokyo Japan Santa Barbara Museum of Art Weatherhill Inc 1998 Lester Gerd Washi Japan s Handmade Paper and its Myriad Uses Arts of Asia Volume 25 Number 1 pp 74 84 Merte Timothy The Japanese Art of Illumination Arts of Asia Volume 23 Number 1 pp 87 94 Yanagi Soetsu The Unknown Craftsman A Japanese Insight into Beauty Tokyo Japan Kodansha International Ltd 1972 Project and How To Books Brown Osa T he Metropolitan Museum of Art Activity Book New York Harry N Abrams 1983 Irons Calvin Irons Rosemary Reuille Burnett James Mathematics from Many Cultures San Francisco CA Mimosa Publications 1993 Meilach Dona Z Menagh Dee Exotic Needlework with Ethnic Patterns Techniques Inspirations New York Crown Publishers 1978 Schuman Jo Miles Art From Many Hand s Worchester Massachusetts Davis Publications 1981 Curriculum Resources Vocabulary aesthetic having to do with a certain style or beauty artifact an object made by a human Buddhism religion of central and eastern Asia that is represented by different sects who following the teachings of Buddha the doctrine attributed to Gautama Buddha that suffering is inseparable from existence but that inward

    Original URL path: http://www.internationalfolkart.org/eventsedu/education/seldomseen/resourcesbibliography.html (2016-02-12)
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  • Museum of International Folk Art | Events & Education : Curricula-Gees Bend Quilts & Beyond-Artists
    fabric I loved watching and playing under the quilts Now when Louisiana pieces or quilts it is not uncommon to find her daughter Alleeanna or her grand daughter Tausyanna sitting nearby watching and drawing their own quilt designs Louisiana usually designs quilts in one of two ways Either she has a design in mind and then gets the cloth she needs to help her realize that design or she has a cloth and comes up with a design to use the cloth In many cases she draws the design out before starting to piece the quilt Most of Mary Lee s quilts are created from fabric that began life as clothing The materials I use is mostly old material People loved their pants or dresses and they have worn out or don t fit anymore I make quilts out of it because I hate throwing away things because somebody can use things that people throw away People are so wasteful now It hurts me to see people waste up things Everything you throw away it can be used and make something beautiful out of it Old clothes have spirit in them They also have love When I make a quilt that s what I want it to have too the love and the spirit of the people who wore it Mary Lee Bendolph In 2001 two self taught Alabama artists longtime friends Lonnie Holley and Thornton Dial visited Gee s Bend with a group of arts professionals who were traveling in the area Mary Lee Bendolph quickly developed a friendship with them Dial and Holley were both raised by women and have made women and women s roles in African American life a central theme of their art Both men use found objects and found materials to create assemblage sculpture

    Original URL path: http://www.internationalfolkart.org/eventsedu/education/geesbend/geesbendartists.html (2016-02-12)
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  • | Events & Education : Curricula- Gees Bend Artists
    and techniques of quilting were passed down through many generations in Gee s Bend Mothers taught their daughters who later taught their own daughters and so on Many families have their own unique traditions and customs that are passed down in a similar way MATERIALS Writing materials Drawing and painting supplies ACTIVITY Ask students to think about traditions in their own families What things have their parents learned from their grandparents What have students learned from their parents Do they still continue these traditions Traditions might be an original recipe for a dish a religious custom a hobby or a job skill Have students generate interview questions to ask a family member about a tradition or custom they ve learned from an older generation After the interview students will write or dictate what they learned and create a drawing or painting to illustrate the tradition After the projects are completed have a class discussion about the various traditions represented Ask students if they would like to continue participating in these or other family traditions Why or why not What sort of traditions would they like to pass on to their own children one day Are family traditions valuable Why or

    Original URL path: http://www.internationalfolkart.org/eventsedu/education/geesbend/geesbendprevisitkto5.html (2016-02-12)
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  • | Events & Education : Curricula- Gees Bend Artists
    Gee s Bend as local people were losing their income and sometimes their homes on local farms after registering to vote Father Francis X Walter an Episcopal priest and civil rights worker saw the potential economic value of quilts he saw hanging on a clothesline and helped the group get started MATERIALS Writing materials Voting rights research resources textbooks U S Constitution and internet links http www usdoj gov http www voicesofcivilrights org http www votingrightsact org http www americaslibrary gov http www wise fau edu ACTIVITIES Have students elect a class president with one fourth of the class kept from voting Explain that the president can make decisions regarding lunchtime homework and breaks for the entire class Discuss what it is like not to have all members of the class vote even when the non voters have to abide by the class president s rules Ask the non voters what it felt like not to vote Did you want to vote Why Ask the voters How did it feel to vote when others could not Have students work in small groups to research the history of voting in the United States Each group will research and share their findings regarding one of the following topics Definition of democracy 1776 Declaration of Independence from England taxation without representation 1870 15th Amendment voting rights to African American males 1920 19th Amendment voting rights to women 1948 Native American voting rights 1960 Civil Rights Act protection of voting rights 1964 24th Amendment ended the poll tax 1971 26th Amendment reduction of voting age qualification to eighteen years Elect a new class president with all students participating this time Ask students to discuss the difference in outcomes Who is president this time How did those who did not vote the first time feel

    Original URL path: http://www.internationalfolkart.org/eventsedu/education/geesbend/geesbendprevisit6to12.html (2016-02-12)
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  • Events & Education : Curricula- Gees Bend Look at Art
    top of the quilt the side that faces up on the bed is always pieced by a quilter working alone and reflects a singular artistic vision The subsequent process of quilting the quilt sewing together the completed top the batting stuffing and the back is sometimes then performed communally among small groups of women Describe the pattern you see in Housetop Variation Is it symmetrical or assymetrical Why do you think the squares are not all exactly the same size shape and color Why do you think the mothers and grandmothers in Gee s Bend think quiltmaking is an important skill to pass on to younger generations What sorts of things has your family taught you What would you like them to teach you What would you want to teach your own children Why Mary Lee Bendolph Work Clothes Quilt 2002 Denim and Cotton 97x 88 inches Collection of the Tinwood Alliance Click Image to enlarge Quilts in Gee s Bend were often constructed using recycled fabric scraps rags and pieces of old clothes What materials in this quilt do you recognize Why do you think some parts of the clothes were used and not others If you were going

    Original URL path: http://www.internationalfolkart.org/eventsedu/education/geesbend/lookatart.html (2016-02-12)
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  • | Events & Education : Curricula- Gees Bend Artists
    place by decorative intersecting seams Symmetry The property of being the same or corresponding on both sides of a central dividing line harmony or beauty of form that results from balanced proportions Texture The feel and appearance of a surface especially how rough or smooth it is Tradition A long established custom or belief often one that has been handed down from generation to generation Bibliography Adult Books Dial New York Harry N Abrams 2002 Gee s Bend The Architecture of the Quilt Atlanta Tinwood Books 2006 Gee s Bend The Women and Their Quilts Atlanta Tinwood Books 2002 Lonnie Holley Do We think Too Much I Don t Think We Can Ever Stop Alabama Birmingham Museum of Art 2004 Mary Lee Bendolph Gee s Bend Quilts and Beyond Atlanta Tinwood Books in Association with the Austin Museum of Art 2002 The Quilts of Gee s Bend Atlanta Tinwood Books in Association with the Austin Museum of Art 2002 Souls Grown Deep Vols 1 2 African American Vernacular Art of the South Atlanta Tinwood Books 2000 Thornton Dial in the 201st Century Atlanta Tinwood Books in Association with the Museum of Fine arts Houston 2005 Children s Books Flournoy Valerie

    Original URL path: http://www.internationalfolkart.org/eventsedu/education/geesbend/geesbendresources.htm (2016-02-12)
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  • Arte y Amistad:Index
    Introduction Links Exhibitions Events Collections Visitor Information Home Public Programs Sunday March 14 2004 2 00 p m Panel Discussion Artists Relate Issues in Hispanic Latino Art With Artists Nicholas Herrera Jerome Lujan Jean Anaya Moya Mel Rivera Sergio Tapia Sandy Besser and moderated by Curator Tey Marianna Nunn Sunday April 25 2004 1 00 to 4 00 pm Families children explore collecting Kids Collect Youth 5 to 18 with

    Original URL path: http://www.internationalfolkart.org/exhibitions/past/artedir/arteyamistadindex.html (2016-02-12)
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