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  • Candelabra
    This ceremony was held in front of an altar adorned with the beautiful candle holder of polychromed clay The central figure on the front stem of the piece is the archangel San Raphael and other images of angels flowers and birds are dispersed on the projecting arms The ceramic pieces made by Aurelio Flores in the mid 20th century were painted in subdued tones of yellow red green orange and

    Original URL path: http://www.internationalfolkart.org/about/treasurechest/closerlook/htm/2302.htm (2016-02-12)
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  • Cerámica y Cultura ~ Origins of Mexican Mayólica
    Hispano Islamic Christian Renaissance forms and designs were blended with those of indigenous Mexican origin Even the early mayólica produced in Mexico did not faithfully follow Spanish models but began to have an aesthetic all its own The loose brushwork

    Original URL path: http://www.internationalfolkart.org/mayolica/origins/spanishmex-en.html (2016-02-12)
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  • Cerámica y Cultura ~ Origins of Mexican Mayólica
    the Pacific known as the Spanish Lake bringing silks porcelains and spices to the Americas At the Pacific port of Acapulco the galleons cargo would be off loaded and packed on donkeys for the long journey across Mexico to the port of Veracruz There the goods were put back on ships to continue their journey to Spain During the trip across Mexico many of the porcelains destined for Spain were

    Original URL path: http://www.internationalfolkart.org/mayolica/origins/chinesemex-en.html (2016-02-12)
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  • Cerámica y Cultura ~ Origins of Mexican Mayólica
    1590 from Seville to Cuba the Dominican Republic Mexico and Colombia included 10 mayólica cups from Triana Seville 1 box of white Sevillian mayólica 200 white mayólica cups from Triana 12 boxes in which are 419 dozen Blue plates and

    Original URL path: http://www.internationalfolkart.org/mayolica/origins/galleon-en.html (2016-02-12)
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  • Cerámica y Cultura ~ Origins of Mexican Mayólica
    Click on any image below to view details Origins of Mexican Mayólica Spanish Influence on Mexican Design Chinese Influence on Mexican Design

    Original URL path: http://www.internationalfolkart.org/mayolica/origins/meximagegallery-en.html (2016-02-12)
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  • Untitled Document
    nara gov guide rg069 html A Brief Overview of the WPA www co broward fl us lii10204 htm By the People For the People Posters from the WPA memory loc gov ammem wpaposters wpahome html The W P A Artist s Project www fineartstrader com wpa htm The WPA Film Archive www abdent com The Library of Congress www loc gov Archives of American Art artarchives si edu start htm

    Original URL path: http://www.internationalfolkart.org/wpasinnombre/links_mainframe.htm (2016-02-12)
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  • Untitled Document
    the Art Program of the Works Progress Administration of the Federal Works Agency In 1942 it became the Graphic Section of the War Services Division From October 1942 to April 1943 it was the Graphic Section of the Division of Program Operations One of the most successful art education programs in New Mexico co existed with the various New Deal and WPA arts related programs In 1929 the first vocational school was founded in Galisteo by Concha Ortiz y Pino de Kleven There students learned embroidery saddlemaking weaving and wood arts The idea grew in popularity Eventually there were over forty schools around the state where hundreds of Hispanas and Hispanos received training in the vocational school system These vocational school classes aimed to teach students the artistic skills they needed to become financially self supporting The community and the schools furnished the materials As a result the majority of art made in the vocational school system was meant for utilitarian and decorative home use within the community Art works including furniture tin weaving and colcha could be marketed via the instructor a wholesaler the artists themselves or by other means such as the Native Market store in Santa Fe

    Original URL path: http://www.internationalfolkart.org/wpasinnombre/depression_mainframe.htm (2016-02-12)
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  • Untitled Document
    New Deal Era Nunn Tey Marianna Albuquerque New Mexico University of New Mexico Press 2001 ISBN 0 8263 2399 5 8 x 10 inches 288 pages 70 color plates 75 half tones hardcover 50 00 Funding for website wpasinnombre org provided by the Rockefeller Foundation Exhibition project funding at the Museum of International Folk Art provided by the Ro ckefeller Foundation the National Endowment for the Arts the McCune Charitable

    Original URL path: http://www.internationalfolkart.org/wpasinnombre/contact_mainframe.htm (2016-02-12)
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