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  • WPA Sin Nombre: Hispano and Hispana Artists of the New Deal Era

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    Original URL path: /wpasinnombre/spanish/index2.htm (2016-02-12)


  • Museum of International Folk Art, Santa Fe | Visitor Information : Private Party Rental Information
    end of the event leaving trash receptacles for Visitors use The Museum recycles plastic bottles and aluminum cans with recycling bins inside the Atrium and on Milner Plaza we also recycle corrugated cardboard Click here for more about recycling in Santa Fe All deliveries in support of events are coordinated by Museum Security designated Catering Company by contacting Museum Security at 476 1204 front desk or 476 1205 to arrange use of the loading dock facilities Deliveries of any kind that have not been disclosed to Museum Security may be refused A schedule for the delivery and pick up of event supplies and equipment will be arranged prior to the event The museum does not have event storage space and cannot be responsible for anything left for more than 48 hours Security Personnel charges begin at 5 p m regardless of event starting time no events will begin before 5 30 p m or end later than midnight without approval from the Museum Director Generally Catering and Museum Security staff are on site for one hour after guests leave Security overtime charges are invoiced after the event for accuracy Security Officers have full authority to intervene to protect Museum property or guests to declare the building s fully occupied to meet fire and life safety regulations It is understood that Museum Security staff determines the number and strategic placement of Security personnel to assure the safety of guests and Museum property A minimum of one Lead Security Staff and one assistant are required for all events on Museum property An estimate of the number of security personnel and cost is specified in the Facilities Use Contract The rate for Museum Security is 30 00 per guard per hour charges are estimated in the contract and invoiced after the event for accuracy All facilities users are required to obtain a Certificate of Insurance for a Special Event policy with a general liability limit of at least one million fifty thousand dollars 1 050 000 that names the Museum of International Folk Art as additionally insured The cost of this insurance varies a call to your insurance carrier is a good place to start quotes from three or more Insurance Companies is also recommended Indoor Events Rental of the Atrium photo left inside the Museum of International Folk Art includes the use and set up of Visitors furnishings 20 tables 54 round up to 100 chairs with arms and many 8 x 3 buffet tables Events requiring the removal of Atrium furnishings will incur additional Security overtime for the removal storage and return of Atrium visitor furnishings Atrium Plants cannot be decorated plants may only be moved by Museum Security Staff Arrangements can be made to remove Atrium flags Use of live flame candles or other additional lighting and any other decorative element s must be approved in advance The Atrium photo left above acoustic panels are excellent for light weight displays or fabrics for event decorations Nothing is to be hung

    Original URL path: http://www.internationalfolkart.org/visitors/conditionsforuse.html (2016-02-12)
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  • Events & Education : Day of The Dead Dia de Muertos
    ones The sugar skulls papel picado food paper flowers skeleton puppets dance and processions that occur during this time encourages participation and expression on a variety of levels Photo right Coming Going Papel Picado By Catalina Delgado Trunk 2015 Día de Muertos Day of the Dead Sunday November 1 2015 1 4PM Celebrate Dia de Los Muertos Day of the Dead Decorate Sugar skulls make picture frames visitors are invited

    Original URL path: http://www.internationalfolkart.org/eventsedu/diademuerto.html (2016-02-12)
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  • Museum of International Folk Art | Events & Education : Curricula- Girard Architecture
    Florence Italy As a child he was fascinated by crèches He envisioned the nativity characters within them as being real Girard created his own crèches from pieces that were given to him Eventually he collected them As an adult Girard studied architecture in Rome and London In 1936 he married Susan Needham from Philadelphia and they moved to Detroit where Girard designed the interiors of offices businesses and homes His concept of design included everything drapery carpets furniture even the placement of objects within a room In 1953 Girard became the head of textile design at the Herman Miller Corporation Here he worked with fellow designers George Nelson and Ray and Charles Eames During this period textiles were considered to be purely functional without much decoration Girard infused his fabric designs with his philosophy that design should be fun and created bold and opulent patterns that became synonymous with the 60 s in the U S A In 1953 the Girards moved to Santa Fe and Alexander continued to work on ground breaking design projects in other parts of the U S A and abroad He created a bold overall look for Braniff Airlines which included everything from the exterior of the plane to the sugar packets that were dispensed with coffee Girard s comprehensive and revolutionary design approach galvanized the La Fonda del Sol and L Etoile restaurants as well as exhibitions at the Museum of Modern Art All the while the Girards had been actively collecting folk art from Latin America Japan India and other countries With me it was really pretty simple love of the objects came first and there was absolutely no other criterion for collection What concerns me is an object s intrinsic value And collecting for that reason is very different from acquiring things

    Original URL path: http://www.internationalfolkart.org/eventsedu/education/girard/25thanniversary/architecture1.html (2016-02-12)
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  • Museum of International Folk Art | Events & Education : Curricula-Dolls Around the World-Girard
    life Dolls found in the collection of the Museum of International Folk Art represent the society and culture from which they originate They are created out of materials that are accessible to a particular people and reflect the dress style and values of that group Alexander Girard the personality behind the Multiple Visions A Common Bond exhibition was especially enamored of dolls and figurines He collected thousands of them and the exhibition explores the similarities and differences of cultures all over the world Russian Dolls Straw dolls from Russia were created in the central agricultural districts Children wore small straw dolls tied to their necks wrists and waist The use of natural materials extended to the northern forest regions where dolls were made out of pine cones birch bark and rolled dried moss tied with linen string Alaskan Native People Dolls The Native people of Alaska make dolls from soapstone and bone materials that are available in the northern climate of Alaska They are clothed with animal furs and sealskin Their clothing articulates the traditional style of dress necessary to survive cold winters wind and snow Navajo Dolls Navajo dolls describe a style of clothing that Navajo women copied from east coast American society in the 1860 s Lincoln s wives and friends wore full dresses made out of satin Navajo women copied the patterns but substituted velvet for the satin and made buttons out of nickels and dimes These stylish skirts are still fashionable today for Navajos and non natives alike Japanese Dolls In Japan some dolls relate to luck One example of this is the daruma doll a round doll composed of a head and body Daruma represents Bodhidharma an East Indian whose limbs withered after prolonged meditation This doll represents fortitude continued prosperity and good fortune Frequently

    Original URL path: http://www.internationalfolkart.org/eventsedu/education/girard/dolls/dollsintro.html (2016-02-12)
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  • Museum of International Folk Art | Events & Education : Curricula-Girard
    relationship between two or more things or be related 5 Interdependent Unable to exist or survive without each other relying on mutual assistance support cooperation or interaction among constituent parts of members Procession A group moving along especially in an organized and ceremonial way Recycle To process used or waste material so that it can be used again to adapt or convert something to a new use Rite of Passage A ritual or ceremony signifying an event in a person s life indicative of a transition from one stage to another as from adolescence to adulthood Sustain To provide somebody with nourishment or the necessities of life to make something continue to exist Sustainable Able to be maintained Global Community Pop up Books New Mexico Content Arts Standards CS1 CS2 CS3 CS4 CS5 CS6 CS7 CS8 Objectives 1 Students will understand how communities reflect diverse cultures historical and cultural understanding 2 Students will learn about the components of international communities perceiving analyzing and responding 3 Students will find different solutions in the process of creating their own global community pop up book creating and performing Materials Stiff paper such as card stock or recycled manila file folders two pieces of equal dimensions for the cover and inside approximately 8 x 14 one piece of stiff paper approximately 4 x 6 for the pop up masking tape scissors pencils markers decorative papers such as magazines old wrapping paper calendars etc glue sticks writing paper 6 Motivation 1 Ask students to talk about international communities they ve seen on TV movies books visited first hand or want to visit Brainstorm to make lists of words that describe these communities Are they similar or different from the community in which they live Are they sustainable Identify what international communities are represented in your class i e where are your clothes book bags textbooks etc made Discuss the origins of your favorite foods i e pizza ramen noodles hummus chocolate etc What elements of a community are important to them How can they represent a community which is global 2 Tell the students that they will be making their own three dimensional pop up book that represents a global community The part of the book that pops up will be the most important element of their global community They can base their global community pop up book on something they have seen or how they visualize or imagine the most important global elements in their world 3 Hold up a prototype made by you of the sample of the type of pop up book that the class will make You can also look at other pop up books which are of communities and settings Explain that they will start by deciding what the background one of the big pieces of paper will be They can think of the background as the setting or scene for their community Encourage discussion of the settings Procedure 1 Students use markers pencils and decorative papers to create a

    Original URL path: http://www.internationalfolkart.org/eventsedu/education/girard/globalcommunityintro.html (2016-02-12)
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  • Museum of International Folk Art | Events & Education : Curricula-Girard Anniversary
    Miller Corporation Here he worked with fellow designers George Nelson and Ray and Charles Eames During this period textiles were considered to be purely functional without much decoration Girard infused his fabric designs with his philosophy that design should be fun and created bold and opulent patterns that became synonymous with the 60 s in the U S A In 1953 the Girards moved to Santa Fe and Alexander continued to work on ground breaking design projects in other parts of the U S A and abroad He created a bold overall look for Braniff Airlines which included everything from the exterior of the plane to stewardess uniforms to the sugar packets that were dispensed with coffee Girard s comprehensive and revolutionary design approach galvanized the La Fonda del Sol and L Etoile restaurants as well as exhibitions at the Museum of Modern Art All the while the Girards had been actively collecting folk art from Latin America Japan India and other countries With me it was really pretty simple love of the objects came first and there was absolutely no other criterion for collection What concerns me is an object s intrinsic value And collecting for that reason is very different from acquiring things as if they were currency Stimulated by international travel their collection began to take on a life of its own in terms of scope and quantity of objects In 1978 the Girards generously donated their collection to the Museum of International Folk Art The following year the new Girard Wing was constructed and the size of the museum doubled Girard orchestrated the design of Multiple Visions and placement of all of the objects He created intricate settings and environments for his collections and eschewed traditional label text as well as traditional exhibition design The installation

    Original URL path: http://www.internationalfolkart.org/eventsedu/education/girard/25anniversary.html (2016-02-12)
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  • Museum of International Folk Art | Events & Education : Curricula-Folk Art of the Andes
    in 1526 and by the 1530s they had conquered most of the ethnic groups living throughout the vast territory The Europeans introduced many aspects of their own culture including the Spanish language and Roman Catholic religion They also brought new food crops and domesticated animals along with European forms of art craft and clothing Over the next three centuries the indigenous people were forced to submit to a powerful authority which imposed many changes on their lives but they managed to retain some of their traditional practices Photo Claudio Jimenez Vicente Antacusi Flores Box with Scene Lima Peru 2007 Gift of Connie Thrasher Jaquith MOIFA Photograph by Blair Clark In the early nineteenth century colonial citizens in different parts of the Andes began to organize an independence movement to free themselves of the Spanish Crown This led to a series of battles where the Spanish military opposed troops consisting of colonists and Indians By 1829 the liberators had succeeded and several autonomous republics were founded Within this post Independence environment folk art began to flourish Mestizo and indigenous artists were freer to create useful and beautiful things for their own benefit and for trade to a broader market www worldatlas

    Original URL path: http://www.internationalfolkart.org/eventsedu/education/andes/andedinto.html (2016-02-12)
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