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  • 2009 ITF Workshop: International Shipping - Global Regulation for a Global Industry
    is vital to ensure the safety efficiency and competitiveness of the international shipping industry which transports about 90 of world trade by volume International Shipping Life Blood of World Trade Simon BENNETT Secretary International Chamber of Shipping International Shipping Market Challenges of the Global Downturn Colin CRIDLAND Head of Market Analysis Clarksons Liberalising Maritime Shipping Maintaining Open Shipping Markets Jörg HABICHT Director Regulatory Affairs Hapag Lloyd Session 2 Energy Efficiency

    Original URL path: http://internationaltransportforum.org/2009/workshops/Mws4.html (2016-02-17)
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  • ECMT Workshop on Competitive Tendering of Rail Passenger Services, Paris, 12 January 2006
    Rail Franchising British Experience Chris NASH Institute for Transport Studies Leeds University UK British Rail Franchising Experiences in Choppy Seas Tom WINSOR White Case London UK Pitfalls in Competitive Tendering Peter KAIN Bureau of Transport and Regional Economics Canberra Australia Tendering and Decentralization of Regional Rail Passenger Services in the Netherlands Hans VAN DIJK Ministry of Transport Public Works and Water Management The Hague Netherlands Experience with Competitive Tendering in

    Original URL path: http://internationaltransportforum.org/IntOrg/ecmt/railways/tendering06.html (2016-02-17)
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  • ECMT Workshop on Rail Infrastructure Charges, Paris, 1-2 February 2005
    1 2 February 2005 Programme Czech Republic Infrastructure Charging System Pavel SKALA Railway Infrastructure Administration and Radim KLUSACEK Ministry of Transport Poland Charging under Severe Cost Recovery Constraints Krzysztof KULESZA Ministry of Transport Poland Access Rate PKP Latvia Infrastructure Charges for a Baltic Railway Raimonds GRAUDINS Latvian Railways Estonia Infrastructure Charges on a Private Vertically Integrated Railway Stephen ARCHER Estonian Railways Kazakhstan Rail Restructuring Nurzhan BAIDAULETOV Kazakhstan Railway Committee Rail

    Original URL path: http://internationaltransportforum.org/IntOrg/ecmt/railways/Paris2005.html (2016-02-17)
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  • ECMT Workshop on Rail Infrastructure Charges, Rome, 9 July 2004
    the Development of International Train Services ECMT Workshop Rome 9 July 2004 Programme Finland Marginal Cost Pricing Tuomo SUVANTO Ministry of Transport and Communications Germany 2001 Route Pricing System Wolfgang BOHRER DB Netz Marketing Switzerland Financing Constraints and Charging System Arnold BERNDT Federal Office of Transport Romania Efficient Charging for a Vertically Separated Railway in an EU Candidate Country Vasile OLIEVSKI Ministry of Transport Slovenia Proposed Charging System for a

    Original URL path: http://internationaltransportforum.org/IntOrg/ecmt/railways/Rome2004.html (2016-02-17)
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  • ECMT Archives
    Pan European Co operation Towards a Strong Inland Waterway Transport 2005 The Inland Waterways of Tomorrow on the European Continent Seminar 2002 Publications Intermodal Transport Documents Intermodal Transport between Europe Asia ECMT UNECE Seminar Kiev 2004 Publications Pan European Transport and Corridors Documents Transport Infrastructure Development for a Wider Europe Seminar Paris 2003 Railways Documents Competitive Tendering of Rail Passenger Services Workshop Paris 2006 Rail Infrastructure Charges Workshop Paris 2005

    Original URL path: http://internationaltransportforum.org/IntOrg/ecmt/archives.html (2016-02-17)
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  • Safe System Implementation Working Group - International Tranpsort Forum
    of Action which states that for all countries whatever their level of developing the guiding principles underlying the Plan for the Decade of Action are those included in the safe system See a video explaining the concept of a safe system Objectives review and document the processes for implementing a safe system at different levels of a jurisdiction assess the expected effect of a safe system on road safety performance identify barriers for implementation provide guidelines for policy makers in their efforts to implement a safe system Expected Outcome The Working Group will prepare an evidenced based research report relying on experiences in ITF OECD countries with practical policy recommendations for the attention of policy makers on the various steps in implementing a safe system approach The report is for the attention of all countries of the ITF which includes countries with a wide diversity of economic and demographic conditions and road safety performance Presentations 1st Meeting of the Group Vision Zero in Sweden Peter Larsson Swedish Transport Agency Sweden Go to slides Safer Journeys New Zealand s Road Safety Strategy 2010 20 Colin Brodie New Zealand Transport Agency Go to slides Sustainable Safety in the Netherlands Wendy Weijermars SWOV Netherlands Go to slide s Towards Zero using evidence and aspiration to reduce road trauma in Western Australi a Iain Cameron Office of Road Safety Western Australia Go to slides Status on the Implementation of a Safe System in Spain Alvaro Gomez DGT Spain Go to slides Safe System approach in Belgium Emmanuelle Dupont IBSR BIVV Belgium Go to slides Safe System Approach the French case Sylvain Lassarre IFSTTAR France Go to slides Chair Mr Iain CAMERON Chairman of Austroads Road Safety Task Force Working Group Members Dr Katsuya ABE Ministry of Land Infrastructure Transport and Tourism Japan Ms Beth

    Original URL path: http://internationaltransportforum.org/jtrc/safety/safe-system/index.html (2016-02-17)
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  • Impact of Distracted Driving and Sleepiness on Road Safety Seminar
    the transport policy agenda Road safety is a core concern The Seminar addresd two rising concerns which are the impact of distracted driving and sleepiness on road safety The use of mobile and on board information and communications technology in vehicles raises serious concerns about their impact on driving performance in relation to road safety They also impact the travel behaviour of non motorised road users cyclists and pedestrians The rise in the use of such devices has been rapid and relatively recent Policy responses differ between jurisdictions and recent developments make this is a good time to compare policies and take stock of the research on distraction and its impact on road safety Fatigue or sleepiness is also a growing concern in several ITF countries and often ranked as a major contributing factor in fatal and injury crashes As distraction it also poses problems for observation monitoring and reporting Both sources of impairment were examined at the seminar The Seminar involved key stakeholders including researchers policy advisors industry police user associations to highlight latest knowledge on these emerging road safety issues and discuss forthcoming developments in regulation vehicle and IT technology that have an impact on distraction and fatigue The Seminar was held during the Transport Research Arena TRA which is the major European Conference for Transportation researchers Objectives and focus The objectives of the Seminar were to discuss latest research work in ITF countries to better understand the impact of distraction and fatigue on driving performance and road safety and identify measures that can help in the short and longer term in mitigating the effects on crash occurrence In particular the Seminar examined to the following questions How to define and measure distracted driving and fatigue How to estimate the prevalence of distraction and fatigue while driving What

    Original URL path: http://internationaltransportforum.org/jtrc/safety/Distracterd-Driving/distracted-driving-semainar.html (2016-02-17)
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  • Buenos Aires Declaration on Better Safety Data for Better Road Safety Outcomes
    collect data it is recommended that data is collected at three levels Outcome level data including the number of persons killed and injured by type of road users type of roads time etc Output level data including performance indicators focusing on road user behaviour and the safety of vehicles and infrastructure Contextual data including exposure data such as population the number of veh km driven by type of road users etc It is recommended that countries also collect data on costs of road crashes and the quality of policies and their implementation All countries from Latin America and the Caribbean countries are encouraged to improve data systems join OISEVI and contribute to IRTAD LAC The model developed for Latin America and the Caribbean with a regional network and a dedicated database designed to be a learning tool could usefully be replicated in other regions of the world Safety data should be aggregated at national level analysed and published by a lead national agency The agency should be able to monitor road safety performance based on key indicators and provide objective assessments of progress and impacts of interventions to those in charge of designing and implementing the road safety strategy In several countries a road safety observatory under the auspices of a lead road safety agency or a lead ministry is in charge of data collection and analysis This model has proven to be a good institutional setting to raise the profile of road safety and encourage policy actions but in monitoring performance maintaining objectivity is crucial in order to arrive at credible conclusions Regular monitoring and analysis of key road safety risk factors for example the frequency of drivers exceeding speed limits the proportion of drivers and passengers not wearing seatbelts drink driving rates helmet wearing rates etc should be undertaken The results of monitoring should be made publicly available at regular intervals and used if appropriate to adapt the road safety strategies in place At a broader level the relationship between road safety performance and economic development needs to be understood over both the long term and over the shorter term in relation to the business cycle Several economic factors may influence road safety including unemployment rate and the level of consumption and production These factors could influence both traffic volume level and composition and road user behaviour Over the business cycle there is evidence of a relationship between economic growth and road safety Generally when economic growth declines and when unemployment increases fewer people are killed on the roads However the mechanisms are imperfectly understood and further research is needed on the causal relationships involved The international community should work towards harmonisation of data including common definitions on the main indicators Most countries have now adopted the 30 day definition to define a fatality other countries are strongly encouraged to do the same Fatality data are not sufficient to understand road safety problems fully Information on injury crashes is essential for a more complete picture of road safety

    Original URL path: http://internationaltransportforum.org/jtrc/safety/Buenos-Aires-Declaration.html (2016-02-17)
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