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  • Object Technology Jeff Sutherland: 04/01/2002 - 05/01/2002
    are introduced This edition differs from its predecessors in that it takes a much more critical stance in its review and synthesis of 5 000 diffusion publications During the past thirty years or so diffusion research has grown to be widely recognized applied and admired but it has also been subjected to both constructive and destructive criticism This criticism is due in large part to the stereotyped and limited ways in which many diffusion scholars have defined the scope and method of their field of study Rogers analyzes the limitations of previous diffusion studies showing for example that the convergence model by which participants create and share information to reach a mutual understanding more accurately describes diffusion in most cases than the linear model Rogers provides an entirely new set of case examples from the Balinese Water Temple to Nintendo videogames that beautifully illustrate his expansive research as well as a completely revised bibliography covering all relevant diffusion scholarship in the past decade Most important he discusses recent research and current topics including social marketing forecasting the rate of adoption technology transfer and more This all inclusive work will be essential reading for scholars and students in the fields of communications marketing geography economic development political science sociology and other related fields for generations to come Strongly recommended This is one of the few books that I reread periodically posted by Jeff Sutherland 12 39 PM 0 comments Barry Boehme s Agile Workshop Summary Summary of the First eWorkshop on Agile Methods April 8 2002 Boehm B Get Ready for Agile Methods with Care IEEE Computer Jan 2002 pp 64 69 A new generation of developers cites the crushing weight of corporate bureaucracy the rapid pace of information technology change and the dehumanizing effects of detailed plan driven development as cause for revolution In their rallying cry the Manifesto for Agile Software Development these developers call for a revitalized approach to development that dispenses with all but the essentials posted by Jeff Sutherland 9 43 AM 0 comments Friday April 19 2002 Languages C causing trouble for Java Williamson Alan There May be Trouble Ahead Java Developers Journal 7 4 C is not a Windows only language is not an inferior Java clone and is not a web services language only It s a subtle way for Microsoft to unofficially support the growing number of Linux seats without losing face Voluminous slashdot comments Posted by michael on Friday April 12 04 51PM from the spill proof container needed dept Jeremy Geelan writes The editor in chief of the world s largest journal devoted to Java wonders whether with the arrival of Microsoft s C programming language on the scene Java perhaps has only 5 years or so left to live Javaland has erupted This is a little like Bill Gates wondering out loud whether to send Scott McNealy a Christmas card But is Alan Williamson right Read this short article and decide for yourself posted by Jeff Sutherland 9 57 AM 0 comments Thursday April 18 2002 Project Management Can FAA Salvage Its IT Disaster The FAA s Course Correction By David Carr and Edward Cone Its tortuous route to modernizing air traffic control systems has cost the Federal Aviation Administration billions Has the agency finally learned its lessons An interesting sidebar to this article is an analysis of costs of waterfall vs spiral approach to development The analysis indicates that the waterfall approach will always be overbudget and late when the user changes the requirements at the 11th hour In the spiral approach with iterative deliveries the user changes requirements earlier and the project comes in on time and on budget Download the charts and graphs posted by Jeff Sutherland 5 20 PM 0 comments Technology Update Supercomputer smashes world speed record 18 16 18 April 02 NewScientist com news service A Japanese supercomputer has recorded the fastest floating point calculation speed of any computer on the planet The feat is reported in the latest edition of the Linpack report a ranking of supercomputer performance The Earth Simulator at the Marine Science and Technology Center in Kanagawa notched up 35 61 teraflops that is over 35 trillion floating point calculations per second The speed is five times faster than that recorded by the previous record holder IBM s ASCI White at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in California This computer achieved a benchmark of 7 23 teraflops posted by Jeff Sutherland 4 14 PM 0 comments Wednesday April 17 2002 Security CSI Seventh Annual Computer Crime and Security Survey Mark Joseph Edwards reports highlights from the results of the Computer Security Institute s CSI s recently released seventh annual Computer Crime and Security Survey The Computer Security Institute CSI recently released the findings of its seventh annual Computer Crime and Security Survey conducted in conjunction with the Federal Bureau of Investigation s FBI s San Francisco based Computer Intrusion Squad According to the survey computer crimes and their related costs continue to increase Survey results are based on responses from 503 security practitioners who work in the business government finance medical and higher education sectors The survey reports that 90 percent of the respondents detected security breaches in the past 12 months and 80 percent suffered measurable financial losses Of the organizations that suffered losses 223 respondents quantified their losses which totaled 455 848 000 Respondents attributed most losses to theft of proprietary information and financial fraud Three quarters of respondents said that their Internet connections were the most frequent points of attack Fill out a form for a free copy of the report posted by Jeff Sutherland 12 47 PM 0 comments Tuesday April 16 2002 Security CERT recommends removing or disabling SNMP Jiang Guofei Multiple Vulnerabilities in SNMP Security and Privacy 2002 Supplement to IEEE Computer 88 4 April 2002 For more than a decade many network administrators have relied on SNMP the Simple Network Management Protocol to monitor and manage network devices Now in its third release

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  • Object Technology Jeff Sutherland: 05/01/2002 - 06/01/2002
    of Defense Secretary Donald H Rumsfeld over the past few months the company said open source software threatens security and its intellectual property But the effort may have backfired A May 10 report prepared for the Defense Department concluded that open source often results in more secure less expensive applications and that if anything its use should be expanded For deeper insight into Microsoft see Microsoft and the Internet Wars Freedom Fighters posted by Jeff Sutherland 5 26 PM 0 comments Wednesday May 22 2002 Security Pervasive Health Care Applications Face Tough Security Challenges Check out the latest article on mobile computing security which details my approach at PatientKeeper to delivery of secure healthcare applications on a PDA Stanford Vince Pervasive Health Care Applications Face Tough Security Challenges IEEE Pervasive Computing Apr Jun 2002 pp 1014 the Health Insurance Portability Accountability Act HIPAA of 1996 dramatically changes the legal environment for medical records processing defining felony offenses and penalties for disclosing individually identifiable medical records There is nothing like the threat of going to prison to concentrate the mind so health care IT executives are now concentrating on bringing their systems into compliance as deadlines phase in This paper is not on the web yet Send me a note if you need a copy posted by Jeff Sutherland 5 09 PM 0 comments Network Capacity Scales with Demand Recently I posted a piece on a new patent for an energy device that creates electricity out of thin air You probably wrote that off as impossible Well a good technologist needs to investigate these things and not dismiss them out of hand Here s another one Pundit David Reed argues that with new techology and repeating stations for wireless devices network capacity actually increases with the number of transmitting stations Radio waves don t cancel each other out Our old technology and the way we use the spectrum artificially limits us In fact the whole FCC approach to regulating spectrum is a dinosaur based on ignorance of fundamental physics posted by Jeff Sutherland 3 28 PM 0 comments Friday May 17 2002 XML Introduction to Xquery by Srinivas Pandrangi and Alex Cheng When my team at a healthcare software company was developing internet distributed workflow systems a few years ago we had to write a homegrown query language for examining XML process definitions The W3C XML Query Working Group has finally delivered a working draft of a general solution XQuery 1 0 An XML Query Language Pandrangi and Cheng have published the first of four articles on Introduction to Xquery Over the past few years XML has rapidly gained popularity as a formatting language for information finding constituencies in both the document centric and data centric worlds The explosive growth of XML based standards bears testimony to XML s interest to many different technical communities Applications now use XML for both transient messages such as SOAP or XML RPC messages and as persistent storage such as in XML databases or content

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  • Object Technology Jeff Sutherland: 06/01/2002 - 07/01/2002
    2006 06 01 2006 07 01 2006 08 01 2006 09 01 2006 09 01 2006 10 01 2006 11 01 2006 12 01 2006 02 01 2007 03 01 2007 03 01 2007 04 01 2007 04 01 2007 05 01 2007 05 01 2007 06 01 2007 06 01 2007 07 01 2007 08 01 2007 09 01 2007 09 01 2007 10 01 2007 10 01 2007 11 01 2007 11 01 2007 12 01 2007 01 01 2008 02 01 2008 02 01 2008 03 01 2008 04 01 2008 05 01 2008 07 01 2008 08 01 2008 09 01 2008 10 01 2008 10 01 2008 11 01 2008 12 01 2008 01 01 2009 04 01 2009 05 01 2009 07 01 2009 08 01 2009 11 01 2009 12 01 2009 12 01 2009 01 01 2010 This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution Noncommercial Share Alike 3 0 Unported License Wednesday June 19 2002 Beam Me Up Australian Scientists Teleport a Beam of Light By Belinda Goldsmith C A N B E R R A June 17 In a world breakthrough out of the realms of Star Trek scientists in Australia have successfully teleported a laser beam of light from one spot to another in a split second but warn don t sell the car yet A team of physicists at the Australian National University ANU announced today they had successfully disembodied a laser beam in one location and rebuilt it in a different spot about one meter away in the blink of an eye Project leader Dr Ping Koy Lam said there was a close resemblance between what his team had achieved and the movement of people in the science fiction series Star Trek but reality was still light years off beaming human beings between locations posted by Jeff Sutherland 5 05 PM 0 comments Sunday June 16 2002 Agile Processes Ken Schwaber s letter to IEEE Computer I read with dismay The Agile Methods Fray where two of the luminaries of software processes discuss traditional defined and agile approaches The discussion was irrelevant to those attempting to understand the distinction A sentence characterized the apparent purpose of the article found a sensible middle ground and identifying some baby to be saved and some bathwater to be replaced There is no middle ground between traditional and agile processes The practices of traditional software development processes are inadequate to control projects with complex technology and sophisticated requirements Agile processes are based on empirical process control a technique widely adapted by competitive manufacturing and development environments over the last twenty years I quote from the bible of process control Process Dynamics Modeling and Control Ogunnaike and Ray Oxford University Press 1992 It is typical to adopt the defined theoretical modeling approach when the underlying mechanisms by which a process operates are reasonably well understood When the process is too complicated for the defined approach the empirical approach is the appropriate

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  • Object Technology Jeff Sutherland: 07/01/2002 - 08/01/2002
    Microsoft is also making its toolbox work more cohesively with the rest of its products by planting the Net Framework in all of its servers over time According to a survey by Evans Data more than half of all developers plan to use Java during some part of the time they spend programming this year and next year whereas only 3 percent will use it exclusively Use of VB on the other hand is expected to decline slightly with 43 5 percent of respondents planning to use VB next year down from 46 percent this year posted by Jeff Sutherland 9 04 PM 0 comments Saturday July 27 2002 Unsafe At Any Speed C s relaxed security model may not be the best fit for your business Excerpt by Al Williams New Architect August 2002 Another new style language Microsoft s C has a slightly different way of handling security one that might appeal to you if you re an old fashioned C programmer like me Some analysts dismiss C as Microsoft s attempt to replace Java out of spite for Sun Certainly Microsoft s reluctance to use Java must have played a major part in the decision to develop C Still it s natural for new languages to imitate older languages to some extent The real test isn t how much a language borrows rather it s how much it adds I ve often said that Java by itself isn t such a spectacular language Its main strength is its well designed standard library I ve often thought that someone could clone the Java library for C and have a winning product C manages this to some extent and it goes even further It not only has libraries that compete with Java s but it also imitates many Java language features One of the most interesting qualities of C is the compromise it makes between the freewheeling style of C and the rigorous restrictions of Java Sun could even learn something from Microsoft in this area When it comes to signing code Microsoft s Net uses a similar architecture to that of Java The Net Common Language Runtime CLR expands on the idea a bit by replacing the idea of a certificate with the concept of evidence Evidence might be a certificate or credentials established by some other authentication method Based on the evidence provided by a piece of code the system grants or denies rights C differs sharply pardon the pun from Java in the amount of self protection it affords programmers C derives much from C and true to its heritage it lets you use pointers and control memory management C s developers realized that while not including these capabilities might be acceptable in a perfect world things aren t always so simple If you have to interface your code with other programs those programs or their data structures might require pointers however error prone they might be Likewise high performance software might require pointers to squeeze

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  • Object Technology Jeff Sutherland: 08/01/2002 - 09/01/2002
    08 01 2005 08 01 2005 09 01 2005 10 01 2005 11 01 2005 11 01 2005 12 01 2005 12 01 2005 01 01 2006 01 01 2006 02 01 2006 02 01 2006 03 01 2006 03 01 2006 04 01 2006 04 01 2006 05 01 2006 05 01 2006 06 01 2006 06 01 2006 07 01 2006 08 01 2006 09 01 2006 09 01 2006 10 01 2006 11 01 2006 12 01 2006 02 01 2007 03 01 2007 03 01 2007 04 01 2007 04 01 2007 05 01 2007 05 01 2007 06 01 2007 06 01 2007 07 01 2007 08 01 2007 09 01 2007 09 01 2007 10 01 2007 10 01 2007 11 01 2007 11 01 2007 12 01 2007 01 01 2008 02 01 2008 02 01 2008 03 01 2008 04 01 2008 05 01 2008 07 01 2008 08 01 2008 09 01 2008 10 01 2008 10 01 2008 11 01 2008 12 01 2008 01 01 2009 04 01 2009 05 01 2009 07 01 2009 08 01 2009 11 01 2009 12 01 2009 12 01 2009 01 01 2010 This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution Noncommercial Share Alike 3 0 Unported License Friday August 23 2002 How Stuff Works Wireless Security Blackpaper Where do you go to get a good description of how wireless security works how it gets hacked and how to prevent intrusion You can go to vendor sites and weed through the hype or to hacker sites and sort through dense technical detail Maybe you just need a good technical description Trey Azariah Dismukes has written a Wireless Security Blackpaper that fits the bill While wireless networks have seen widespread adoption in the home user markets widely reported and easily exploited holes in the standard security system have stunted wireless deployment rate in enterprise environments While many people don t know exactly what the weaknesses are most have accepted the prevailing wisdom that wireless networks are inherently insecure and nothing can be done about it Can wireless networks be deployed securely today What exactly are the security holes in the current standard and how do they work Where is wireless security headed in the future This article attempts to shed light on these questions and others about wireless networking security in an enterprise environment posted by Jeff Sutherland 11 00 AM 0 comments Wednesday August 21 2002 SCRUM vs Waterfall Point and Counterpoint Note CMM is a service mark of the Software Engineering Institute at Carnegie Mellon University Shawn Presson Director of Organizational Practice ITS Services Inc says Why why why does everything think the waterfall life cycle is exclusively linear It was designed to be extremely iterative it allowed for the fact that there may be parallel non sequential sets of requirements under development hence multiple simultaneous waterfalls it in no way assumed that requirements will be static during a project

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  • Object Technology Jeff Sutherland: 09/01/2002 - 10/01/2002
    08 01 2003 09 01 2003 09 01 2003 10 01 2003 10 01 2003 11 01 2003 11 01 2003 12 01 2003 12 01 2003 01 01 2004 01 01 2004 02 01 2004 02 01 2004 03 01 2004 03 01 2004 04 01 2004 04 01 2004 05 01 2004 05 01 2004 06 01 2004 06 01 2004 07 01 2004 07 01 2004 08 01 2004 08 01 2004 09 01 2004 09 01 2004 10 01 2004 10 01 2004 11 01 2004 11 01 2004 12 01 2004 12 01 2004 01 01 2005 01 01 2005 02 01 2005 02 01 2005 03 01 2005 03 01 2005 04 01 2005 04 01 2005 05 01 2005 05 01 2005 06 01 2005 06 01 2005 07 01 2005 07 01 2005 08 01 2005 08 01 2005 09 01 2005 10 01 2005 11 01 2005 11 01 2005 12 01 2005 12 01 2005 01 01 2006 01 01 2006 02 01 2006 02 01 2006 03 01 2006 03 01 2006 04 01 2006 04 01 2006 05 01 2006 05 01 2006 06 01 2006 06 01 2006 07 01 2006 08 01 2006 09 01 2006 09 01 2006 10 01 2006 11 01 2006 12 01 2006 02 01 2007 03 01 2007 03 01 2007 04 01 2007 04 01 2007 05 01 2007 05 01 2007 06 01 2007 06 01 2007 07 01 2007 08 01 2007 09 01 2007 09 01 2007 10 01 2007 10 01 2007 11 01 2007 11 01 2007 12 01 2007 01 01 2008 02 01 2008 02 01 2008 03 01 2008 04 01 2008 05 01 2008 07 01 2008 08 01 2008 09 01 2008 10 01 2008 10 01 2008 11 01 2008 12 01 2008 01 01 2009 04 01 2009 05 01 2009 07 01 2009 08 01 2009 11 01 2009 12 01 2009 12 01 2009 01 01 2010 This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution Noncommercial Share Alike 3 0 Unported License Monday September 30 2002 Morning Roll Call Issue 101 During my days running professional engineering services for a Department of Defense consultancy we used daily stand up meetings during the harried proposal preparation process Here the idea was to make the meetings as brief as possible hence the standup part no getting comfortable in a big chair The meetings were designed to quickly keep everyone informed of progress to highlight any problems and to provide cross team collaboration As you ll see from reading David s article and references on SCRUM these types of meetings can have very beneficial effects on a development project Jon Kern posted by Jeff Sutherland 3 03 AM 0 comments Thursday September 26 2002 Agile Software Development Methods Review and Analysis Abrahasson Pekka et al Agile software development Review and Analysis ESPOO 2002 VTT Publications 478 107p

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  • Object Technology Jeff Sutherland: 10/01/2002 - 11/01/2002
    She has published her entire new book online Highly recommended Poppendieck Mary Lean Development A Toolkit for Software Development Managers Addison Wesley 2003 in press posted by Jeff Sutherland 12 00 PM 0 comments Wednesday October 23 2002 Smalltalk Alan Kay has a Toy for You Smalltalk is alive and well in the Squeak community Since the inventor of Smalltalk Alan Kay moved to Disney and resurrected an open version of Smalltalk the Squeak Birds of a Feather Session at OOPSLA has been a fun feature Check out SqueakLand and you will wind up downloading a Squeak plugin to your browser You ll feel better now that you have Smalltalk running on your computer again despite the bugs Etoys are computer environments that help people learn ideas by building and playing around with them They help an omniuser usually a child create a satisfying and enjoyable computer model of the idea and give hints for how the idea can be expanded SimStories are longer versions of Etoys that like essays string several ideas together to help the learner produce a deeper and more concerted project A good motto for Etoys and SimStories is We make not just to have but to know Another motto that applies here is Doing with images makes symbols That is the progression of learning moves from kinesthetic interactions with dynamic images to a symbolic expression of the idea Etoys and SimStories in Squeak by Alan Kay posted by Jeff Sutherland 10 57 AM 0 comments Saturday October 19 2002 Agile Development XP Scales to Large Projects Scaling Agile Methods Can eXtreme programming work for large projects By Sanjay Murthi New Architect October 2002 From literate programming to evolutionary delivery veteran project managers have seen a variety of shifting development methodologies Most recently a family of new methods has emerged united under the umbrella of agile development These include eXtreme programming XP Scrum Feature Driven Development and a few others Agile methods have introduced new practices such as pair programming while discarding some old ones Agile development favors delivering working code over complete documentation for example Recently top proponents of these techniques have laid out twelve principles for agile development in the form of the Agile Manifesto www agilemanifesto org Trial By Fire Recently I had the opportunity to use eXtreme programming XP on a large software product release The team consisted of more than fifty people located in two different development centers At first I was skeptical that XP could work for us I knew that historically XP has been most successful with small and very committed teams and while our team was enthusiastic and committed we certainly weren t small Fortunately the results of the experiment came as a pleasant surprise Using XP methods project teams were more enthusiastic and eager People enjoyed XP s concept of pair programming and it allowed any member of the team to fix anyone else s bugs As a manager this reduced my stress levels when a team member was out sick or on vacation posted by Jeff Sutherland 12 42 PM 0 comments Wednesday October 16 2002 Security Interview with Sun s New Chief Security Officer The Diffie Hellman algorithm introduced by Whitfield Diffie and Martin Hellman in 1976 was the first system to utilize public key or asymmetric cryptographic keys Diffie was recently appointed CSO of Sun Microsystems This occurred shortly after Microsoft got religion about security and appointed Scott Charney as chief security strategist at Microsoft Sun s Security King Cryptography pioneer Whit Diffie offers illuminating views on his ascension to Sun Microsystems CSO Interviewed by Richard Thieme CISO Aug 2002 Where are the financial incentives for businesses to invest in security It s still difficult to show a quantifiable return on security investment to decision makers isn t it The intrinsic costs you can now do high grade cryptography in ordinary chips for example have dropped a long way The extrinsic costs affect things like why can t you buy a secure phone for less This is fundamental If you can integrate things into the product line of a major manufacturer of equipment you can get the overhead down to where the extrinsic costs will decline and cost based resistance will decline After Microsoft s announcement that security is now a priority Sun CEO Scott McNealey said that Sun didn t need to send out a letter to make that point Yet that was followed pretty quickly by your appointment as advocate for Sun s security offerings Where s the distinction There s a rift exemplified by the difference between myself and Scott Charney chief security strategist at Microsoft Scott is a policeman Police think in terms of diagnosing things and retaliating Security people think in terms of preventing things Neither viewpoint is comprehensive and it s foolish to say that either alone can be entirely adequate My prejudice is in favor of security mechanisms denial of objective mechanisms as far as possible using intrusion detection diagnosis and response mechanisms wherever necessary posted by Jeff Sutherland 10 29 AM 0 comments Tuesday October 15 2002 Mountain Goat Software on SCRUM Mike Kohn has a nice description and presentation of the SCRUM development process on his web site Check it out Scrum works because it is a highly empowering process that allows requirements and self organizing teams to emerge In their book Schwaber and Beedle describe Scrum as an empirical process that uses frequent inspection daily meetings collaboration and adaptive responses They contrast this to defined processes in which every task and outcome is defined Defined processes work only when the inputs to the process can be perfectly defined and there is very little noise ambiguity or change If that doesn t sound like the software projects you work on look into Scrum posted by Jeff Sutherland 4 25 PM 0 comments Sunday October 13 2002 Agile Project Management with SCRUM Ambler Scott Managers Manage Software Development Oct 2002 p 43 Scott provides a brief

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  • Object Technology Jeff Sutherland: 11/01/2002 - 12/01/2002
    01 01 2004 01 01 2004 02 01 2004 02 01 2004 03 01 2004 03 01 2004 04 01 2004 04 01 2004 05 01 2004 05 01 2004 06 01 2004 06 01 2004 07 01 2004 07 01 2004 08 01 2004 08 01 2004 09 01 2004 09 01 2004 10 01 2004 10 01 2004 11 01 2004 11 01 2004 12 01 2004 12 01 2004 01 01 2005 01 01 2005 02 01 2005 02 01 2005 03 01 2005 03 01 2005 04 01 2005 04 01 2005 05 01 2005 05 01 2005 06 01 2005 06 01 2005 07 01 2005 07 01 2005 08 01 2005 08 01 2005 09 01 2005 10 01 2005 11 01 2005 11 01 2005 12 01 2005 12 01 2005 01 01 2006 01 01 2006 02 01 2006 02 01 2006 03 01 2006 03 01 2006 04 01 2006 04 01 2006 05 01 2006 05 01 2006 06 01 2006 06 01 2006 07 01 2006 08 01 2006 09 01 2006 09 01 2006 10 01 2006 11 01 2006 12 01 2006 02 01 2007 03 01 2007 03 01 2007 04 01 2007 04 01 2007 05 01 2007 05 01 2007 06 01 2007 06 01 2007 07 01 2007 08 01 2007 09 01 2007 09 01 2007 10 01 2007 10 01 2007 11 01 2007 11 01 2007 12 01 2007 01 01 2008 02 01 2008 02 01 2008 03 01 2008 04 01 2008 05 01 2008 07 01 2008 08 01 2008 09 01 2008 10 01 2008 10 01 2008 11 01 2008 12 01 2008 01 01 2009 04 01 2009 05 01 2009 07 01 2009 08 01 2009 11 01 2009 12 01 2009 12 01 2009 01 01 2010 This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution Noncommercial Share Alike 3 0 Unported License Monday November 11 2002 Development Tools IntelliJ IDEA 3 0 Duane Fields reviews IDEA 3 0 in Java Developers Journal Sep 2002 It supports many of the refactoring capabilities in Fowler Martin et al Refactoring Improving the Design of Existing Code Addison Wesley 1999 Our lead architect likes it and Duane Fields says I must admit until recently my idea of an integrated development environment was Emacs a couple of shell windows and a six pack of Dr Pepper I had nothing against IDEs in fact I was all for them I just couldn t find one that worked for me instead of the other way around Everything I tried either didn t format code the way I liked required the entire development team to convert to it didn t run my build scripts wouldn t talk to my source code control system or otherwise forced me to bend to its will Maybe I m too picky but hey I like to do things my way For the past

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