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  • Object Technology Jeff Sutherland: 12/01/2002 - 01/01/2003
    starts o An organization considers that a suitable iteration length is measured in months rather than weeks o You think that the pre programming phase of UML diagramming and design activities is a time to fully and accurately define designs and models in great detail and of programming as a simple mechanical translation of these into code o You try to plan a project in detail from start to finish allocating the work to each iteration you try to speculatively predict all the iterations and what will happen in each one o An organization wants believable plans and estimates for projects before they have entered the elaboration phase o An organization thinks that adopting the RUP means to do many of the possible activities and create many documents and thinks of or experiences the RUP as a formal process with many steps to be followed We are confident that by applying the checklist of misunderstandings your adoption of the RUP and iterative development will be a spectacular mess posted by Jeff Sutherland 4 52 PM 0 comments Wednesday December 18 2002 SCRUM Dealing with Bugs in a Sprint Recently a question was posted on the object technology list asking how to handle bugs during a SCRUM sprint We have refined the art of SCRUM project management at PatientKeeper during the past couple of years to handle multiple simultaneous sprints with thousands of simultaneous tasks integrating bug tracking with development project tracking The requirement for the project management system was less than 60 seconds per day per developer to update and less than 10 minutes per day for the project manager to do complete reporting with charts and graphs In order to meet this requirement the developers could not use any other software program than the bug tracking system they already used We added only a few data items to include development tasks in with bugs class development task or bug initial estimate time invested and percent complete Our team was already using an the open source bug tracking system GNATS We enhanced GNATS with these data items and the ability to dump data into an Excel spreadsheet automatically every day for the project manager The Burndown Chart above was published in Sutherland Jeff Agile Can Scale Inventing and Reinventing SCRUM in Five Companies Cutter IT Journal 14 12 5 11 Dec 2001 If you would like a copy send me email The chart represents a rather long Sprint required to deliver Release 6 of the PatientKeeper mobile product for clinical results Planning for this project started in April while another release was in progress and development items were entered into GNATS which included initial estimates Initial estimates are frozen and cannot be changed after entry This allows us to assess estimation accuracy at a later date You can see the backlog building as new project pieces are entered The Sprint was kicked off in June and there was a rapid increase in backlog as product marketing added new tasks and developers found out their initial estimates were too short or tasks were missing In the initial part of a Sprint the challenge is to get the backlog complete and start flying the backlog curve down into the delivery date In this case delivery had a hard stop at 20 August As bugs are found they go into the same system It is possible to enter estimates for fixing bugs but we usually track them by count The data dumped to the project manager allows the data to be look at in multiple ways It also shows bug inflow and outflow by day so you can see how many bugs are being found and fixed as you move forward This metric is one of the most critical information for assessing stability of the code as well as the success of the project In the development Sprint which ended on 20 August in this chart the project manager is primarily focused on cumulative days remaining for unfinished tasks On August 20 we moved into a QA sprint The project manager then shifted to focus totally on bug counts remaining day by day including inflow and outflow Testing is going on during the development cycle and tasks should not be completed until high priority bugs are eliminated If bugs are found after the task is logged complete it can be reopened or the bug can be fixed by the developer owner in the midst of working on other tasks In any case this effort is reflected in a rising or falling backlog curve At the end of every day each developer reviews tasks and bugs being worked on in the same GNATS user interface and updates the database in less than 60 seconds This is the best project management system I have ever seen or experienced Time required for update and reporting project management statistics has been reduced by at least two orders of magnitude over other approaches I ve seen In addition the Backlog Curve reflects thousands of individual estimates that are updated daily This micro costing of the project effort yields more accurate estimates of project completion than other approaches Highly recommended posted by Jeff Sutherland 2 34 PM 0 comments Monday December 16 2002 Boston Digerati Sites to check out Sites to Watch for News of What s Next Boston Globe by Scott Kirsner 12 16 2002 Dan Bricklin Dan wrote Visicalc which was the application that really started the PC revolution It was later eclipsed by Lotus which was then overtaken by Excel As a technologist with deep historical perspective Dan s log is worth reading He wrote the first piece I have seen that gives a good assessment of the potential impact of the new tablet PCs John Robb Robb has been a technology analyst at Forrester Research and Gomez Advisors and he brings the incisive approach he learned at those two local firms to his weblog Robb is one of the more prolific bloggers on this list

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  • Object Technology Jeff Sutherland: 01/01/2003 - 02/01/2003
    that use distributed resources on the internet Peterson Larry et al A Blueprint for Introducing Disruptive Technology Into the Internet Proceedings of the First ACM Workshop on Hot Topics in Networks HotNets I Princeton NJ October 2002 It s not easy reading but thinking a new thought is never easy There are no established concepts and vocabulary to describe it Background reading I cited the classic text on disruptive techology on 22 April 1999 after the CEO of Harvard Business School Press faxed me a copy saying it was a must read for technical leaders There is a new edition hot off the press this month Christensen Clayton M The Innovator s Dilemma The Revolutionary National Bestseller That Changed the Way We Do Business HarperBusiness 2003 The compelling point about this book is that it shows how the best managed companies will fail in spite of doing the right thing every step of the way in the face of a disruptive technology The market dynamics are similar to the martial arts Aikido or JuJitsu where the more powerful opponent winds up flat on the mat because the weaker opponent uses the attackers energy to neutralize him It makes Bill Gates and Andy Grove paranoid posted by Jeff Sutherland 8 38 PM 0 comments Friday January 17 2003 Java Wars Sun vs Microsoft Sun Microsystems won an injunction against Microsoft on 12 Dec 2002 and the court s opinion provides some interesting insight into Microsoft competitive tactics See SUN MICROSYSTEMS INC v MICROSOFT CORPORATION Civil No JFM 02 2739 It is important for technical leaders to understand the details of competitive strategies in the marketplace because it directly impacts the rational selection of architectures and technologies Because of the competitive threat Java presented Microsoft devised and implemented a strategy to wrest control of Java away from Sun and to turn Java into just the latest best way to write Windows applications Pl s Ex 21 4 14 97 Slivka email to Gates In order to preserve Java s cross platform functionality Sun required in all of its license and distribution agreements including the one with Microsoft that a licensee s implementation of the Java platform meet a test suite demonstrating that the implementation was compatible with the core Java platform Though pretending to embrace the goal of compatibility Microsoft intentionally took various steps to defeat that goal First Microsoft made unauthorized modifications to the core Java class libraries Sun Microsystems Inc v Microsoft Corp 999 F Supp 1301 1309 10 N D Cal 1998 Second its implementation Microsoft failed to include support for what is known as Java Native Interface a technology designed to permit programs written in Java to draw upon the native code of an underlying operating system FOF 388 390 84 F Supp 2d at 105 06 Sun Microsystems Inc v Microsoft Corp 21 F Supp 2d 1109 1119 22 N D Cal 1998 vacated 188 F 3d 1115 9th Cir 1999 Third Microsoft altered its developer tools and virtual machine to recognize Microsoft specific keywords and compiler directives that would run only on Microsoft s implementations FOF 394 84 F Supp 2d at 106 07 Sun Microsystems 21 F Supp 2d at 1122 25 This had the effect as Sun correctly characterizes it of changing the Java language to create a dialect only Microsoft products could understand Fourth Microsoft prevented developers from having ready access to a set of class libraries useful for creating distributed computing applications known as RMI remote method 5 invocation FOF 391 393 84 F Supp 2d at 106 Instead as found by Judge Jackson it buried the link in an obscure location and neglected to include an entry for it in the site s index Referring to RMI and any Java developers who might access Microsoft s site looking for it a Microsoft employee wrote to his approving manager They ll have to stumble across it to know it s there I d say it s pretty buried FOF 392 84 F Supp 2d at 106 Fifth Microsoft intentionally deceived developers into believing the software products they were developing with Microsoft tools were cross platform United States v Microsoft Corp 253 F 3d 34 76 77 D C Cir 2001 see also FOF 395 403 84 F Supp 2d at 107 09 explaining how Microsoft induced developers to use the Microsoft implementation rather than the Sun compliant implementation The purpose of the strategy devised and implemented by Microsoft was described in its internal documents A November 1996 email stated W e should just quietly grow j Microsoft s incompatible developer tools share and assume that people will take more advantage of our classes without ever realizing they are building win32 only java apps FOF 394 84 F Supp 2d at 107 Another document was even more succinct Kill cross platform Java by grow ing the polluted Java market Microsoft 253 F 3d at 76 77 quoting Government Ex 259 While thus deliberately fragmenting the Java platform to make it less attractive for developers and users Microsoft also successfully embarked upon a campaign to destroy Sun s channels of distribution for Java In May 1995 Netscape Corporation agreed to include a copy of Sun s Java runtime environment with every copy of Navigator Netscape s web browser and Navigator quickly became the principal vehicle by which Sun placed copies of its Java runtime environment on the PC systems of Windows users FOF 76 84 F Supp 2d at 30 In order to curtail this line of distribution Microsoft undertook a number of anticompetitive actions that seriously impeded distribution of Navigator Microsoft 253 F 3d at 75 Microsoft also entered into First Wave Agreements with dozens of independent software vendors that conditioned receipt of Windows technical information upon the ISVs agreement to promote Microsoft s JVM Java Virtual Machine exclusively Id Finally Microsoft successfully stopped Intel Corporation from cooperating with Sun and Netscape in the development of a cross platform Java runtime environment by

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  • Object Technology Jeff Sutherland: 02/01/2003 - 03/01/2003
    Programming s how Click here for more posted by Jeff Sutherland 3 03 PM 0 comments Thursday February 06 2003 CALL FOR PAPERS XP Agile Universe 2003 XP Agile Universe 2003 August 10 13 2003 New Orleans Following the success of last year s conference XP Agile Universe 2003 will bring together experts practitioners and novices in the field of Extreme Programming and Agile Methods High quality peer reviewed papers will provide an overview on the latest trends and will allow the industry practitioners to find out when and how these approaches can improve their software development processes A large number of tutorials will prove helpful to those who desire greater insight into agile software processes Technical workshops will be forums for discussing latest insights SUBMISSION DATE February 28 2003 Deadlines for technical paper submissions workshop proposals educator symposium paper submissions tutorials proposals TECHNICAL PAPERS Chairs Frank Maurer maurer cpsc ucalgary ca Don Wells Don extremeprogramming org We seek technical papers documenting research experiences and new approaches practices in Extreme Programming and Agile Methods Topics include but are not limited to New Agile Methods and TechniquesAgile Modeling and Design Scalability of Agile MethodsAgile Software Engineering Dispersed Agile TeamsBeyond Extreme Programming Ad Hoc and Hybrid MethodsPair Programming Open Source and AgilityRefactoring Tool Support for Agile MethodsAgile Testing and Quality Assurance Adoption Education and TrainingIssues of Frequent Deployment Agile ManagementTime Constrained Requirements Engineering Customers and ContractsKnowledge Management in Agile Processes Lightweight PlanningLong Term Implications of Agile Methods Adding Agility to an OrganizationEmpirical Results and Validation Teamwork and CollaborationExperience Reports Papers must be original and not under consideration for publication elsewhere Papers must be of high quality and well written Papers may represent actual experience or fully researched ideas Experience papers should be up to 6 pages Papers reporting significant research results should be no more than 10 pages Papers presenting opposing views are also strongly encouraged All papers must be written in English Papers will be peer reviewed for originality content relevance significance and correctness when compared to current trends in the field Each paper must include an title author s address and email address abstract keyword list body summary or conclusion acknowledgements short author biography and well populated bibliography Please send submission electronically to xpu extremeprogramming org PDF Microsoft Word or RTF formats are acceptable Conference Proceedings will be published by Springer as part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science Final manuscripts need to be formatted according to the Springer Lecture Notes in Computer Science guidelines http www springer de comp lncs instruct typeinst pdf posted by Jeff Sutherland 3 50 PM 0 comments SCRUM Keep Team Size Under 7 Today I wrote up an experience report on using SCRUM in large development teams for a new book that Craig Larman is writing I described how a few teams in a 500 person development group generated production code at five times the industry average while most of the teams who executed SCRUM well only doubled productivity over industry average One

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  • Object Technology Jeff Sutherland: 03/01/2003 - 04/01/2003
    industry averages combined with data on one of the key papers that influenced the first SCRUM Coplien s paper was part of an ATT Bell Labs study that investigated many large projects and analysed the development process environment and implementation James Coplien Borland Software Craftsmanship A New Look at Process Quality and Productivity Proceedings of the 5th Annual Borland International Conference Orlando 1994 Borland Quattro for Windows BWP Project SCRUM like implementation 1 000 000 lines of C code BWP Industry standard Time in months 31 50 Staff 8 100 Function points per staff month 77 2 So in the extreme case for large projects it is possible to scale to a 500 developer effort with only 40 developers on staff and deliver the project in almost half the time with SCRUM This is the goal of SCRUM and was the target when it was invented Even if your team only gets 10 of the way towards the goal you will smoke your competition posted by Jeff Sutherland 2 10 PM 0 comments SCRUM Get Your Requirements Straight Before Coding Here are some comments on requirements needs for a SCRUM motivated by postings in the scrumdevelopment yahoogroups com list Here I am talking about product companies There are parallels for IS internal development The SCRUM s that I work with deal with changes to the requirements during the sprint iteration The product manager is part of the SCRUM for this reason The development SCRUM does not define initial requirements unless they are a product marketing SCRUM We have always started a development SCRUM with some working code Thus a SCRUM is designed to improve a codebase The functional specification provided by marketing should be based on running prototypes shown to customers or potential customers who agree that is what they want for the next release It may be one sprint or several to get to the release My current customers are physicians and they don t have time to meet in the daily SCRUMs so product marketing physicians have to be their surrogates Physicians have taught me that a product WILL NOT BE USED unless it carefully meets their workflow is extremely responsive and can be customized quickly whenever it has shortcomings Since failure is immediate by physician refusal to use the product for more than a few days it must be close to right the first time and fixed within a month or you fail and have to go find another customer This tight discipline required by the physician environment has made me realize that all projects should be run with this discipline If they are not failure may take longer but the system ultimately does not sell well or get used well So I think my comments are relevant in other environments You won t win big unless you do this In addition if product marketing is not clear about customer or market needs neither is senior management If senior management is not behind a project priorities will

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  • Object Technology Jeff Sutherland: 04/01/2003 - 05/01/2003
    summer school a whirlwind lecture tour and a growing band of rebel scientists in universities promoting his approach All of this while he stills remains a successful CEO at Mathematica I was in a somewhat altered state of consciousness from being midway through WWII veteran Col Philip Corso s book on the UFO crash at Roswell in 1947 Being a West Point grad who spent 15 years in the military mostly as an Air Force fighter pilot I had my own UFO experience and found Col Corso s story credible The most interesting idea he presented was that Bell Lab researchers were given an integrated chip recovered from the Roswell crash which they reengineered to product the first transistor The latest microprocessors are probably more similar to that chip than the first primitive transistor created by mimicking silicon doped with arsenic and I may be communicating to you via an alien technology Corso Philip The Day After Roswell Pocket Books 1998 In any event as Alan Kay the inventor of Smalltalk points out interesting discoveries are found by investigating anomolous events that do not fit ordinary experience This is how his team invented the mouse the windows user interface Smalltalk the ethernet the laser printer and the first real workstation Puzzling over alien technology is a good starting point for approaching Wolfram s work In fact he had just come from a talk to string theory physicists who he said were not hostile to his point of view but considered it alien Wolfram s book is a hefty piece of literature and I had him sign it at the Quantum reception I m studying it carefully a small piece at a time It merits that level of attention His basic argument is that cellular automata can exhibit complex behavior with a few simple rules Adding more complexity to the rules doesn t necessary add more complexity to the behavior For some cool examples of cellular automata check out The Temple of Alife More interesting is his view of conventional mathematics which has been the primary tool for describing natural systems Unfortunately complex calculus and differential equations can only adequately describe simple phenomena You quickly need to move to computer simulations to describe any complex behavior One you move to computation simple rules are more useful than calculus for generating complex behavior such as the growth of a tree or rendering of a natural scene This is obviously heresy to mathematicians In a previous incarnation I was assistant professor of mathematics at the U S Air Force Academy and I have some sympathy with Wolfram s position This is not heresy to computer scientists who are familiar with cellular automata In fact it can be shown that many simple automata are computational complete i e they can generate any calculation that is possible on a computer Thus the computer can simulate all of the results of calculus and in a sense cellular automata can be shown to subsume calculus Calculus is

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  • Object Technology Jeff Sutherland: 05/01/2003 - 06/01/2003
    2003 07 01 2003 07 01 2003 08 01 2003 08 01 2003 09 01 2003 09 01 2003 10 01 2003 10 01 2003 11 01 2003 11 01 2003 12 01 2003 12 01 2003 01 01 2004 01 01 2004 02 01 2004 02 01 2004 03 01 2004 03 01 2004 04 01 2004 04 01 2004 05 01 2004 05 01 2004 06 01 2004 06 01 2004 07 01 2004 07 01 2004 08 01 2004 08 01 2004 09 01 2004 09 01 2004 10 01 2004 10 01 2004 11 01 2004 11 01 2004 12 01 2004 12 01 2004 01 01 2005 01 01 2005 02 01 2005 02 01 2005 03 01 2005 03 01 2005 04 01 2005 04 01 2005 05 01 2005 05 01 2005 06 01 2005 06 01 2005 07 01 2005 07 01 2005 08 01 2005 08 01 2005 09 01 2005 10 01 2005 11 01 2005 11 01 2005 12 01 2005 12 01 2005 01 01 2006 01 01 2006 02 01 2006 02 01 2006 03 01 2006 03 01 2006 04 01 2006 04 01 2006 05 01 2006 05 01 2006 06 01 2006 06 01 2006 07 01 2006 08 01 2006 09 01 2006 09 01 2006 10 01 2006 11 01 2006 12 01 2006 02 01 2007 03 01 2007 03 01 2007 04 01 2007 04 01 2007 05 01 2007 05 01 2007 06 01 2007 06 01 2007 07 01 2007 08 01 2007 09 01 2007 09 01 2007 10 01 2007 10 01 2007 11 01 2007 11 01 2007 12 01 2007 01 01 2008 02 01 2008 02 01 2008 03 01 2008 04 01

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  • Object Technology Jeff Sutherland: 06/01/2003 - 07/01/2003
    04 01 2003 05 01 2003 05 01 2003 06 01 2003 06 01 2003 07 01 2003 07 01 2003 08 01 2003 08 01 2003 09 01 2003 09 01 2003 10 01 2003 10 01 2003 11 01 2003 11 01 2003 12 01 2003 12 01 2003 01 01 2004 01 01 2004 02 01 2004 02 01 2004 03 01 2004 03 01 2004 04 01 2004 04 01 2004 05 01 2004 05 01 2004 06 01 2004 06 01 2004 07 01 2004 07 01 2004 08 01 2004 08 01 2004 09 01 2004 09 01 2004 10 01 2004 10 01 2004 11 01 2004 11 01 2004 12 01 2004 12 01 2004 01 01 2005 01 01 2005 02 01 2005 02 01 2005 03 01 2005 03 01 2005 04 01 2005 04 01 2005 05 01 2005 05 01 2005 06 01 2005 06 01 2005 07 01 2005 07 01 2005 08 01 2005 08 01 2005 09 01 2005 10 01 2005 11 01 2005 11 01 2005 12 01 2005 12 01 2005 01 01 2006 01 01 2006 02 01 2006 02 01 2006 03 01 2006 03 01 2006 04 01 2006 04 01 2006 05 01 2006 05 01 2006 06 01 2006 06 01 2006 07 01 2006 08 01 2006 09 01 2006 09 01 2006 10 01 2006 11 01 2006 12 01 2006 02 01 2007 03 01 2007 03 01 2007 04 01 2007 04 01 2007 05 01 2007 05 01 2007 06 01 2007 06 01 2007 07 01 2007 08 01 2007 09 01 2007 09 01 2007 10 01 2007 10 01 2007 11 01 2007 11 01 2007 12 01 2007 01 01 2008 02 01 2008 02 01 2008 03 01 2008 04 01 2008 05 01 2008 07 01 2008 08 01 2008 09 01 2008 10 01 2008 10 01 2008 11 01 2008 12 01 2008 01 01 2009 04 01 2009 05 01 2009 07 01 2009 08 01 2009 11 01 2009 12 01 2009 12 01 2009 01 01 2010 This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution Noncommercial Share Alike 3 0 Unported License Wednesday June 25 2003 Expert Systems Principles and Programming Expert systems are getting better and better ISABEL an expert system for diagnosing pediatric disease is 95 accurate a lot better than most physicians And it has a cool natural language interface ISABEL a web based differential diagnostic aid for paediatrics results from an initial performance evaluation P Ramnarayan A Tomlinson A Rao M Coren A Winrow and J Britto Archives of Disease in Childhood 2003 88 408 413 I m working on an innovative project to manage big workflow around the surgery process in the country s largest trauma center We need a good expert system for the workflow engine to interrogate so I m reading the latest

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  • Object Technology Jeff Sutherland: 07/01/2003 - 08/01/2003
    04 01 2006 04 01 2006 05 01 2006 05 01 2006 06 01 2006 06 01 2006 07 01 2006 08 01 2006 09 01 2006 09 01 2006 10 01 2006 11 01 2006 12 01 2006 02 01 2007 03 01 2007 03 01 2007 04 01 2007 04 01 2007 05 01 2007 05 01 2007 06 01 2007 06 01 2007 07 01 2007 08 01 2007 09 01 2007 09 01 2007 10 01 2007 10 01 2007 11 01 2007 11 01 2007 12 01 2007 01 01 2008 02 01 2008 02 01 2008 03 01 2008 04 01 2008 05 01 2008 07 01 2008 08 01 2008 09 01 2008 10 01 2008 10 01 2008 11 01 2008 12 01 2008 01 01 2009 04 01 2009 05 01 2009 07 01 2009 08 01 2009 11 01 2009 12 01 2009 12 01 2009 01 01 2010 This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution Noncommercial Share Alike 3 0 Unported License Monday July 28 2003 SCRUM How to Fail with the Rational Unified Process Seven Steps to Pain and Suffering I received a request not to post this article previously even though it was posted elsewhere Craig Larman agreed to send anyone a copy Now it has a home on the Agile Alliance site for easy access It s a good read and everyone should check it out How to Fail with the Rational Unified Process Seven Steps to Pain and Suffering Craig Larman Chief Scientist Valtech USA craig craiglarman com Philippe Kruchten Rational Fellow Rational Software Canada pbk rational com Kurt Bittner General Manager Process and Project Management Business Unit Rational Software kbittner rational com posted by Jeff Sutherland 4 42 PM 0 comments Computer Languages One Giant Step Backward There are a series of letters in the current issue of Communications of the ACM on an article written a couple of months ago on the value of domain oriented computer languages COBOL and FORTRAN have yet to be replaced because of their dominance in specific domains Large scale efforts like PL1 an Ada have been dismal failures Today s few general purpose languages are not well suited to describing financial and mathematical analysis domains Some veteran programmers are moving toward scripting languages like Python that allow easy implementation of solutions that you would never bother to program in C or Ruby an elegant implementation of objects that would make a Smalltalk programmer smile Get in on the language debate by checking out Communications of the ACM Volume 46 Number 5 May 2003 Pages 21 23 Practical programmer One giant step backward Robert L Glass Old saying The more things change the more they remain the same or do they It is common for software developers to talk about the rapid change of pace in our field We say things like It s hard to keep up with all the things that are happening and

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