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  • Object Technology Jeff Sutherland: 04/01/2004 - 05/01/2004
    01 2006 05 01 2006 05 01 2006 06 01 2006 06 01 2006 07 01 2006 08 01 2006 09 01 2006 09 01 2006 10 01 2006 11 01 2006 12 01 2006 02 01 2007 03 01 2007 03 01 2007 04 01 2007 04 01 2007 05 01 2007 05 01 2007 06 01 2007 06 01 2007 07 01 2007 08 01 2007 09 01 2007 09 01 2007 10 01 2007 10 01 2007 11 01 2007 11 01 2007 12 01 2007 01 01 2008 02 01 2008 02 01 2008 03 01 2008 04 01 2008 05 01 2008 07 01 2008 08 01 2008 09 01 2008 10 01 2008 10 01 2008 11 01 2008 12 01 2008 01 01 2009 04 01 2009 05 01 2009 07 01 2009 08 01 2009 11 01 2009 12 01 2009 12 01 2009 01 01 2010 This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution Noncommercial Share Alike 3 0 Unported License Wednesday April 21 2004 Working Together In War Rooms Doubles Teams Productivity University Of Michigan Researchers Find PHILADELPHIA Teams of workers that labored together for several months in specially designed war rooms were twice as productive as their counterparts working in traditional office arrangements a study by University of Michigan researchers has found Results of the study will be presented Dec 6 at the Association for Computing Machinery 2000 Conference on Computer Supported Cooperative Work Recently many companies in the software industry have been experimenting with putting teams of workers into war rooms to enhance communication and promote intense collaboration explains Stephanie Teasley an assistant research scientist in the U M School of Information s Collaboratory for Research on Electronic Work Instead of toiling in separate cubicles workers sit at wall less workstations in one big open room The room is typically outfitted with central worktables whiteboards and flip charts to facilitate group discussions While companies expect benefits from such arrangements workers sometimes balk at the idea fearing they ll sacrifice privacy and the quiet they need to concentrate on demanding tasks The U M researchers say their study is the first to closely examine the effects of what they call radical collocation on both productivity and worker satisfaction Teasley collaborated on the project with Mayuram Krishnan and Judith Olson of U M and Lisa Covi who was at U M when the work was done but now is at Rutgers University The group studied six software development teams at a major automobile company all of which had little or no experience working in war room settings The researchers evaluated the workers productivity using measures commonly used in software development then they compared the war room teams scores with productivity data the company had collected on software development teams working in traditionally arranged offices The researchers also interviewed the workers and had them fill out questionnaires at the beginning and end of the project In addition they made detailed

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  • Object Technology Jeff Sutherland: 05/01/2004 - 06/01/2004
    2004 11 01 2004 11 01 2004 12 01 2004 12 01 2004 01 01 2005 01 01 2005 02 01 2005 02 01 2005 03 01 2005 03 01 2005 04 01 2005 04 01 2005 05 01 2005 05 01 2005 06 01 2005 06 01 2005 07 01 2005 07 01 2005 08 01 2005 08 01 2005 09 01 2005 10 01 2005 11 01 2005 11 01 2005 12 01 2005 12 01 2005 01 01 2006 01 01 2006 02 01 2006 02 01 2006 03 01 2006 03 01 2006 04 01 2006 04 01 2006 05 01 2006 05 01 2006 06 01 2006 06 01 2006 07 01 2006 08 01 2006 09 01 2006 09 01 2006 10 01 2006 11 01 2006 12 01 2006 02 01 2007 03 01 2007 03 01 2007 04 01 2007 04 01 2007 05 01 2007 05 01 2007 06 01 2007 06 01 2007 07 01 2007 08 01 2007 09 01 2007 09 01 2007 10 01 2007 10 01 2007 11 01 2007 11 01 2007 12 01 2007 01 01 2008 02 01 2008 02 01 2008 03 01 2008 04 01 2008 05 01 2008 07 01 2008 08 01 2008 09 01 2008 10 01 2008 10 01 2008 11 01 2008 12 01 2008 01 01 2009 04 01 2009 05 01 2009 07 01 2009 08 01 2009 11 01 2009 12 01 2009 12 01 2009 01 01 2010 This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution Noncommercial Share Alike 3 0 Unported License Wednesday May 12 2004 Ensembles A New Way to Build a Component Architecture At a meeting of the Microsoft Business Framework Advisory Council in Redmond last week I was reminded once again that there is a lack of good component models in object design tools The best one I have seen was created by the first software Scrum at Easel Corporation in 1993 There was a reasonable implementation of this in the Object Studio Smalltalk environment now owned by Cincom and in a testing product by Jeff McKenna Other than that elegant component design implementations are nowhere to be found A Zen Master was asked by a student if he should go study under a teacher who claimed to be enlightened The Zen Master a collector of rare wooden buddhas paused and then exclaimed There are enlightened teachers everywhere but a good wooden buddha is hard to find There are patterns and object models everywhere but a good component model is harder to find than a good wooden buddha Object Management Group Business Object Domain Task Force Ensembles A Component Design Pattern for Business Objects June 4 6 1995 San Jose CA Doc No OMG TC Document CF 96 01 04 Doc Date 25 Jun 1995 updated 1997 2004 by request Abstract Successful companies generate continuous innovation through knowledge generation using a Scrum product development process documented by

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  • Object Technology Jeff Sutherland: 06/01/2004 - 07/01/2004
    a product price check for different applications The changes to Sun s software which Sun will be rolling out over the next two years will be coupled with consulting services including a SOA Readiness Assessment program Sun said the product enhancements of Project Kitty Hawk will make it easier for software developers to write Web services applications using Java For example a product under development code named Project Disco will give programmers a visual tool for assembling applications using a Web services language called Business Process Execution Language for automating business processes according to people familiar with Sun s plans Project Kitty Hawk will let developers find assemble and deliver applications based on a services oriented architecture using Java Web services said Joe Keller Sun s vice president of marketing for Java Web services and developer tools posted by Jeff Sutherland 3 46 PM 0 comments Tuesday June 22 2004 Languages Evolution of C C and Java Language evolution is always interesting because it has a significant impact on the programmer s life and incredible impact on the business because of productivity implications Here is an article worth reading The C Source In the Spirit of C by Greg Colvin June 21 2004 posted by Jeff Sutherland 3 01 PM 0 comments Friday June 18 2004 SOA Not a Buzz Word Anymore SAP is using a service oriented architecture approach to get its customers to upgrade in an evolutionary manner CEO Prof Dr Kagermann points out it is a core strategy for the company SOA is not a buzzword We know what to do and how to do it The idea of SOA of services encapsulated objects and services is not new The technology is there The performance is there And we have enough experience from the applications we know what type of services are required and how to design more generic services I feel quite confident Henning Kagermann eWeek May 24 2004 IBM DeveloperWorks has a number of white papers on SOA Start here posted by Jeff Sutherland 10 28 AM 0 comments Monday June 07 2004 Service Oriented Architecture Why OOAD and BPM are Not Enough An interdisciplinary modeling approach for SOA projects Olaf Zimmermann ozimmer de ibm com Senior IT Architect IBM Pal Krogdahl pal krogdahl se ibm com Solution Architect IBM Clive Gee clive us ibm com Senior Solution Architect IBM 2 Jun 2004 Experience from first Service Oriented Architecture SOA implementation projects suggest that existing development processes and notations such as Object Oriented Analysis and Design OOAD Enterprise Architecture EA frameworks and Business Process Modeling BPM only cover part of what is required to support the architectural patterns currently emerging under the SOA umbrella Thus there is a need for an enhanced interdisciplinary service modeling approach In a recent interview at Info World see Resources Grady Booch stated that the fundamentals of engineering like good abstractions good separation of concerns never go out of style but he also pointed out that there are real opportunities

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  • Object Technology Jeff Sutherland: 07/01/2004 - 08/01/2004
    05 01 2005 06 01 2005 06 01 2005 07 01 2005 07 01 2005 08 01 2005 08 01 2005 09 01 2005 10 01 2005 11 01 2005 11 01 2005 12 01 2005 12 01 2005 01 01 2006 01 01 2006 02 01 2006 02 01 2006 03 01 2006 03 01 2006 04 01 2006 04 01 2006 05 01 2006 05 01 2006 06 01 2006 06 01 2006 07 01 2006 08 01 2006 09 01 2006 09 01 2006 10 01 2006 11 01 2006 12 01 2006 02 01 2007 03 01 2007 03 01 2007 04 01 2007 04 01 2007 05 01 2007 05 01 2007 06 01 2007 06 01 2007 07 01 2007 08 01 2007 09 01 2007 09 01 2007 10 01 2007 10 01 2007 11 01 2007 11 01 2007 12 01 2007 01 01 2008 02 01 2008 02 01 2008 03 01 2008 04 01 2008 05 01 2008 07 01 2008 08 01 2008 09 01 2008 10 01 2008 10 01 2008 11 01 2008 12 01 2008 01 01 2009 04 01 2009 05 01 2009 07 01 2009 08 01 2009 11 01 2009 12 01 2009 12 01 2009 01 01 2010 This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution Noncommercial Share Alike 3 0 Unported License Friday July 30 2004 Helping the Garbage Collector NOT Some years ago I posted a note on the importance of garbage collection and the fact that introducing a C garbage collector would make most C applications run faster reduce lines of code lower the number of bugs and simplify design This is not a hallucination It remains a fact today I spent a lot of time digging into this when I was VP of Object Technology at a Smalltalk company I directed the migration of a mark sweep garbage collector in our Smalltalk compiler to a generational collector All garbage collectors are not equal In Java 1 0 and 1 1 a mark sweep collector was used that could result in penalties for allocation and deallocation There are a lot of Java articles out there that still recommend things like object pooling as a result In Java 1 2 a generational collector was introduced This improved performance to the point where most developers should not even think about garbage collection Almost anything they do will increase design complexity increase lines of code increase bugs and decrease performance Java theory and practice Garbage collection and performance Hints tips and myths about writing garbage collection friendly classes Brian Goetz brian quiotix com Principal Consultant Quiotix Corp 27 Jan 2004 The past two installments of Java theory and practice have discussed various techniques for garbage collection and the basics of the JDK 1 4 1 garbage collectors This month columnist Brian Goetz looks at the performance impact of the choice of collector how various coding idioms interact with the garbage collector

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  • Object Technology Jeff Sutherland: 08/01/2004 - 09/01/2004
    of popular packages are loaded into our db driven system and users can contribute their own notes to virtually any class field method In short JDocs provides a knowledge base defined around the major Java api s themselves so you can find the information you re looking for right where it should be in the documentation posted by Jeff Sutherland 9 13 AM 0 comments Wednesday August 18 2004 Patterns Model View Controller Pattern Critical to Cross Platform Development Tools An Authoring Technology for Multidevice Web Applications Guruduth Banavar Lawrence Bergman Richard Cardone Vianney Chevalier Yves Gaeremynck Frederique Giraud Christine Halverson Shin ichi Hirose Masahiro Hori Fumihiko Kitayama Goh Kondoh Ashish Kundu Kohichi Ono Andreas Schade Danny Soroker and Kim Winz IEEE Pervasive Computing Jul Sep 2004 The rapid proliferation of mobile computing devices has increased the complexity and cost of cross platform application development Multi DeviceAuthoring Technology MDAT lets developers build a generic applicationcommon to multiple devices and customize it for specific devices Notably we found that the programmers understanding of MVC prior to their MDAT experience affected their understanding and use of the tool For example if their previous experience was with Web design or with Struts they had expectations about the model that might not have been realized Al though many assume MVC to be well understood it is in fact an amorphous design pattern Existing implementations from SmallTalk to Struts differ considerably A survey of the literature both academic and popular shows variability in definitions of the MVC paradigm particularly in the connections between the various components The two primary variations re volve around whether the Model and the View talk directly to each other or whether the Controller handles all messaging and action We can t overstate MVC s importance for a novice s introduction to MDAT MDAT s power is based on the programmer creating an abstracted description of the Controller and View components as well as the connections between the components In most cases the code is automatically generated from these abstract descriptions For the Model however programmers must write concrete code that s connected to abstract or generated Controller and View components This blurring of the abstract and concrete is particularly important because of the role that mental models play Research in the early 1990s explored the role of mental models in teaching programming and in understanding how to use programming In both cases understanding the structural mental model what the system does to solve a problem is ultimately more powerful than a functional mental model how to solve the problem No difference exists in the performance between those taught a functional or structural model for standard problems For new problems however that don t have an existing functional model programmers who un derstand the structural model will be faster and more efficient at solving the problem When using a new tool such as MDAT most problems are novel so a clear understanding of the underlying structural model in this case MVC is critical Our finding that users had different structural mental models of MVC meant that they had difficulty linking past programming experience to programming in MDAT Consequently we found that learning MDAT was more difficult than we expected posted by Jeff Sutherland 9 24 AM 0 comments Friday August 13 2004 SCRUM Productivity Gains with eXtreme Programming For some years now several authors of the Agile Manifesto have discussed Scrum as a process wrapper for XP processes It s introduction to a new team can be quick and easy and XP engineering processes can be adopted over time as the team can adapt Also Scrum has a scaling strategy that has repeatedly worked on large implementations whereas XP engineering approaches are most clearly visible in a small team The May June 2003 issue of IEEE Software focused on XP One of the more interesting articles is about the experience of a team of two building an application of 2445 lines of code at NASA Langley Research Center building government research software in Ruby Since Ruby combines some of the best features of Smalltalk and Perl it is arguably one of the most enjoyable modern programming languages and a major change form the FORTRAN programming these researchers were familiar with Wood William A and Kleb William I Exploring XP for Scientific Work IEEE Software 20 3 30 36 May June 2003 While 2545 lines of code is not very useful for most commercial projects having spent 13 years in a previous incarnation on research software in numerical analysis and statistics I know a few lines of code may incorporate many person years of hard won knowledge Consider that this small piece of code delivers a software test bed for evaluating the performance of a numerical scheme to solve a model advection diffusion problem The model employs a multistage Runge Kutta strategy for temporal evolution with multigrid sequencing The particular algorithmic research feature is a strategy for the pointwise optimization of the Runge Kutta coefficients to achieve particular damping characteristics as a tool for convergence acceleration The typical commercial developer would need to spend a couple of years on a masters degree to be able to write this kind of code But I digress One of the most interesting aspects of this paper is that the single pair of programmers produced 912 lines of production code the remainder was test code and utilities at the rate of 27 lines per hour for the pair On previous projects programmers produced 12 lines of production code per hour or 24 for a pair of programmers However they had to deliver 2144 lines of code to achieve the same level of functionality as the XP application more than twice as much code In the project relentless refactoring combined with Ruby advantages over Fortran where key considerations that more than doubled productivity in a NASA project on an initial project with a new development process and a new language On the average FORTRAN takes 107 lines

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  • Object Technology Jeff Sutherland: 09/01/2004 - 10/01/2004
    01 2008 05 01 2008 07 01 2008 08 01 2008 09 01 2008 10 01 2008 10 01 2008 11 01 2008 12 01 2008 01 01 2009 04 01 2009 05 01 2009 07 01 2009 08 01 2009 11 01 2009 12 01 2009 12 01 2009 01 01 2010 This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution Noncommercial Share Alike 3 0 Unported License Tuesday September 14 2004 Real Time Process Improvement with SCRUM Tonight I am giving a presentation on SCRUM at the Boston Software Process Improvement Network monthly meeting at MITRE Corp in Bedford MA It is a variant of the SCRUM Theory and Practice portion of the OTUG workshop I did in Minneapolis last year Sutherland Jeff Scrum Theory and Practice Object Technology User Group Distinguished Lecture Agile Software Development with SCRUM with Application to Healthcare Mobile Platform Development University of St Thomas St Paul MN March 18 2003 A core piece of this presentation is a review of iterative and incremental development a basic strategy for all agile processes It is important to note that leading experts in the field felt strongly even in 1957 that the waterfall method did not describe what actually happened in software development Yet the waterfall method has become a lingering urban myth despite causing hundreds of billions of dollars of project failures It is essential to constantly remind people that the waterfall method is fundamentally flawed in concept and has doomed to failure many of the most well funded software projects Larman and Basili s paper on this topic is required reading for those interested in this topic Send me a note if you can t get your hands on a copy Larman Craig and Basili Victor Iterative and Incremental Development A Brief History IEEE Computer 36 6 47 56 June 2003 We were doing incremental development as early as 1957 in Los Angeles under the direction of Bernie Dimsdale at IBM s Service Bureau Corporation He was a colleague of John von Neumann so perhaps he learned it there or assumed it as totally natural I do remember Herb Jacobs primarily though we all participated developing a large simulation for Motorola where the technique used was as far as I can tell indistinguishable from XP When much of the same team was reassembled in Washington DC in 1958 to develop Project Mercury we had our own machine and the new Share Operating System whose symbolic modification and assembly allowed us to build the system incrementally which we did with great success Project Mercury was the seed bed out of which grew the IBM Federal Systems Division Thus that division started with a history and tradition of incremental development All of us as far as I can remember thought waterfalling of a huge project was rather stupid or at least ignorant of the realities I think what the waterfall description did for us was make us realize that we were doing something else something unnamed

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  • Object Technology Jeff Sutherland: 10/01/2004 - 11/01/2004
    01 2008 02 01 2008 02 01 2008 03 01 2008 04 01 2008 05 01 2008 07 01 2008 08 01 2008 09 01 2008 10 01 2008 10 01 2008 11 01 2008 12 01 2008 01 01 2009 04 01 2009 05 01 2009 07 01 2009 08 01 2009 11 01 2009 12 01 2009 12 01 2009 01 01 2010 This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution Noncommercial Share Alike 3 0 Unported License Sunday October 24 2004 Start With Scrum Primavera Looked for Something Better Bob Schatz came to Primavera a few years ago as the new Vice President of Development He brought with him experiences from his career at General Electric and then a software start up Steeped in the principles of leadership Schatz made a number of changes to increase the developers productivity and teamwork these included new office space motivational meetings and programs and realigning the organization The incremental improvements that he achieved were all very positive but still inadequate to meet the needs of the company and its customers Best Practices in Scrum Project Management and XP Agile Software Development Primavera Success Story Object Mentor Inc and Certified ScrumMaster White Paper 2004 Bob started by training all of his managers as ScrumMasters the Scrum equivalent of a project manager It is the ScrumMaster s role to facilitate collaboration between the marketing department and development teams to build increments of functionality in monthly iterations The first iteration or Sprint in Scrum terminology made significant progress on the primary risk of release 4 0 integrating two separate software systems Primavera had decided that a key feature of release 4 0 was the integration of a new workflow and collaboration system into their project management software This integration was extensive and devilishly difficult A review was held at the end of the first Sprint The team demonstrated some project management portal functionality to management and executives Since one of the Scrum rules is that only increments of potentially shippable product functionality can be demonstrated at the end of each Sprint this was solid tested documented functionality Dick Faris Joel Koppelman and most of the management team were present along with the product marketing managers and team As the functionality was demonstrated everyone became ecstatic The risk was probably removed because the entire product worked seamlessly Frankly nobody could believe what they were seeing just one month into the development cycle This initial success gave Scrum the credibility within Primavera for it to proceed A starting point had been established in code for extending the workflow and collaboration to all part s of Primavera s new release The team had proven to themselves and everyone else that it could build functionality every month And most importantly since everyone could see the functionality working they could start brainstorming about the most important next steps to take They could direct the team to build the next most valuable functionality during the next month s

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  • Object Technology Jeff Sutherland: 11/01/2004 - 12/01/2004
    2003 07 01 2003 08 01 2003 08 01 2003 09 01 2003 09 01 2003 10 01 2003 10 01 2003 11 01 2003 11 01 2003 12 01 2003 12 01 2003 01 01 2004 01 01 2004 02 01 2004 02 01 2004 03 01 2004 03 01 2004 04 01 2004 04 01 2004 05 01 2004 05 01 2004 06 01 2004 06 01 2004 07 01 2004 07 01 2004 08 01 2004 08 01 2004 09 01 2004 09 01 2004 10 01 2004 10 01 2004 11 01 2004 11 01 2004 12 01 2004 12 01 2004 01 01 2005 01 01 2005 02 01 2005 02 01 2005 03 01 2005 03 01 2005 04 01 2005 04 01 2005 05 01 2005 05 01 2005 06 01 2005 06 01 2005 07 01 2005 07 01 2005 08 01 2005 08 01 2005 09 01 2005 10 01 2005 11 01 2005 11 01 2005 12 01 2005 12 01 2005 01 01 2006 01 01 2006 02 01 2006 02 01 2006 03 01 2006 03 01 2006 04 01 2006 04 01 2006 05 01 2006 05 01 2006 06 01 2006 06 01 2006 07 01 2006 08 01 2006 09 01 2006 09 01 2006 10 01 2006 11 01 2006 12 01 2006 02 01 2007 03 01 2007 03 01 2007 04 01 2007 04 01 2007 05 01 2007 05 01 2007 06 01 2007 06 01 2007 07 01 2007 08 01 2007 09 01 2007 09 01 2007 10 01 2007 10 01 2007 11 01 2007 11 01 2007 12 01 2007 01 01 2008 02 01 2008 02 01 2008 03 01 2008 04 01 2008 05 01

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