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  • Problems below Lock One - Lakes Need Water
    The low water level is causing slumping of the dried out river banks where deeper water occurs Huge sections of riverbank that have been supporting trees buildings and other heavy objects are either toppling into the river or are on the brink of doing so Read the media release from 17 December 2009 Riverbank Collapse Update from the DWLBC And this article in the Advertiser Now Homes at risk The low river level is causing real concern for home owners This home is one of fifteen in a row to be affected by a slumping riverbank Authorities have issued notices to vacate due to a serious threat of property collapse into the river This also means that they cannot continue to insure their properties Further downstream near Long Island Marina large chunks of the river bank have toppled into the river only to destroy houseboat moorings and several cars that were parked nearby Only one vehicle has since been retrieved Slumping riverbank below Lock 1 and that willow used to be on solid riverbank photos by Geraldine Cox Dried out wetlands releasing acid into the water supply of Adelaide For several years now these wetlands have been drying out There

    Original URL path: http://www.lakesneedwater.org/lower-lakes-coorong-problems/problems-below-lock-one (2016-02-09)
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  • Dissecting the Tides - Lakes Need Water
    how the recorded minimums increased by about 0 5m due to barometric change maybe about 0 2m and associated winds and ocean swells whereas the predicted astronomical minimums were steady of if anything in the opposite direction The maximum water level on October 1 was about 1 1m below our recently recorded max in July of 1 4m but sufficient to just reach the road below the barrage Because the various barrages were only about 5 open the volume of seawater entering the Lower Lakes was restricted but salinities upstream of Ewe and Tauwitcherie did reach 35 000 EC for up to 4 days We know last time in May it took about 24 hrs for salty water to reach Point Sturt but have no info this time because of station closure The quick change in wind direction from SW to E have seen water levels in the Goolwa area change from about 0 4m AHD to 0 9m today Of no great significance except to add credence to Sturt s descriptions of his journey At first he had trouble exiting the Mouth of the Murray at Pomanda because of strong SW winds which forced him on the lee shore

    Original URL path: http://www.lakesneedwater.org/feature/ian-s-corner/dissecting-the-tides (2016-02-09)
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  • Seawater Intrusion Observations - Lakes Need Water
    on water quality upstream of the Goolwa Barrage with salinities reaching 5000 EC at the Hindmarsh Island Bridge even though the Goolwa Barrage was completely closed Could it be a combination of leakage through and under the Barrage and sand dunes groundwater and possibly fish passages Attached is the latest plot from 1 5km upstream of the Ewe Island Barrage This plot which is being added to continuously seems to

    Original URL path: http://www.lakesneedwater.org/feature/seawater-intrusion-observations (2016-02-09)
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  • Rediscovering the Past - Lakes Need Water
    can see that everytime there was a drought period talks about locking the river 1860 s and upstream irrigation late 1870 s and the disastrous 1880 s came to the fore The drought period of the 1880 s was inevitably followed by another wet period and the Murray again flooded in 1890 only to be followed by the very severe 1895 to 1902 Federation Drought and the Lower Lake farmers blaming upstream diversions and lobbying for the construction of the barrages to combat seawater intrusions The similarity between major changes of river flows and the ebb and flow of farmers above and below Goyder s Line depending upon rainfall is becoming clearer As we have seen recently these large El Nino La Nina oscillations not only effect river flows but our mid north and northern areas George Goyder Surveyor General of South Australia in 1861 first established what became known as Goyder s Line in 1865 during the early 1860 s drought By the time it was made law in 1872 the rains had returned there was also a major Murray flood in 1871 and 1876 and he was ridiculed Farmers ventured north again But then the inevitable happened and the 1880 s were disastrous and all those northern towns were deserted as evidenced by the ruins we see today An interesting sideline is the role of the South Australian government In 1878 they first complained about upstream irrigators but in 1887 they signed an agreement with the Chaffey Bros to establish an irrigation settlement at Renmark the first irrigation settlement in Australia and despite opposition they did not stipulate extraction limits This irrigation settlement was quickly followed by one in Mildura And back in the 1850 s the following description of flows through the Mouth was written The union

    Original URL path: http://www.lakesneedwater.org/feature/rediscovering-the-past (2016-02-09)
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  • King Tides - Lakes Need Water
    ocean swells and strong NW to WNW winds up to 40 knots Locally the impact of the high tide was waves depositing seaweed etc 1m to 1 5m above beach level on the dunes at Goolwa Beach the inundation of the road to B19 boat ramp immediately downstream of the Barrage the almost complete inundation of the B19 boat ramp as shown by the deposit of debris see photo below the similar inundation of the Sugar s Beach boat ramp at Middleton the waves reached the base of the alluvial cliffs east of Middleton Creek and swept upstream to the footbridge over the Creek and despite the closure of 90 of the barrages an increase of salinities to 30 000 EC upstream of most of the barrages This event was the fifth major sea water intrusion event since May 22 nd but with the highest tides The Lower Lake salinities had not fully recovered from these prior events Had more of the barrage gates been open there would have been a major sea water intrusion much greater than the previous events The Goolwa area would have experienced water levels between those of the 1956 and 1974 floods but this time

    Original URL path: http://www.lakesneedwater.org/feature/king-tides (2016-02-09)
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  • Lower Lakes Local History - Lakes Need Water
    nearly ten ton we got in one haul and loading them up in fact when the barrages were getting built the copper dam on the Island s side was nearly finished and several ton of mulloway swam into the dam and they closed them off accidentally they didn t know and you could see them all swimming around in the sheet piling around the dams keeping them in We got permission to save some of the other fish we could go in and catch them if we could It was pretty hard because the sheet piling was straight up and down and to get in there under the fish and hoist them up We give it away but the chaps working on the barrages had the time of their lives afterwards when the water got pumped out around the dam around these big old mulloway Every day you might say in the 50s up until the 60s there was catches of fish coming up on the Goolwa Wharf and they d go away to town I don t know of any people lately that have the schools of fish It s just one of those things with the Mouth being closed like it is Back in those days it was a good Mouth a nice wide Mouth and the fish could come in and out Rose Did they want to get up into the lake to spawn Bert I think that s mainly what they wanted Early in the piece we used to fish in the lake as well while the barrages were being built The mulloway d go up there and you d catch them in the winter The Milang fishers had done well people at Milang and Narrung and all those places they fished in the lake The mulloway d get up there specially in a school and probably breed up there I don t know but you d catch them in the summer coming in the winter going out There was all salt water in Goolwa in those days We used to go down with a little net down opposite the station Goolwa railway station then we d walk around and get a feed of mullet You could fish off the wharf there was a lot of garfish around Mr Lush he used to be a champion on garfish He was getting a lot more than we were The secret he said Is using a stud blow fly They were just joking Across from the ferry there were dolphins there Big old fisherman used to put nets out there and catch mulloway A lot of the tidal waters a lot of these places are now dry especially down on South Lakes and out there Those banks out there are normally dry with the low tide and get flooded with the whole tide Rose What did that whole area get flooded there By the tide Really How far back did it go Bert Yeah Tidal waters It d go with salt water to the lake Rose Out near South Lakes how far that way Bert Ah well Aggie s Knob that s the one close in to the South Lakes it would go around there like that and this bank around here would go dry and over here opposite here Rose Liverpool Road Bert Would be dry totally dry Interview with Harold Bedford Recorded October 1999 TAPE 1 SIDE B D Harold can you describe for us the building of the Barrage H B Overall it s a very long story the building of the barrage was the final major structure of the barrage works Let s have it quite clear the barrage was a structure to prevent salt water coming from the sea up into Lake Alexandrina and that s what the barrage was It s performing its duty as I say by excluding salt water It s sort of you know the fresh water fishing was never very much even hand line there is more caught over here now than in those days D Did they begin building the barrage in 1935 W B Yes in 1935 D And finished in 1940 W B They were completed on the 7th February 1940 There is five there is Goolwa Mundoo Boundary Creek Ewe Isalnd and Tauwitcherie There s a lock here at Goolwa and a small one at Tauwitcherie that is only for small boats and the other four run right across This is something which always bugs me about the bridge here and all the fuss and bother about the natives There was never a thing said nothing during the building of the barrages There s a Lock here and there s a small one to Tauwitchery that is only for small boats They were finished on the 7th February 1940 and they came into operations on 17th February 1940 which happened to be my father s birthday and he was D What difference do you think the barrage made to Goolwa W B Tremendous D Right what were the differences H B Well for a start there was employment on the barrages itself permanent gang and a lot of maintenance that sort of thing but Goolwa itself it didn t make much difference After once they reached a stage on the Mannum pipeline the men were offered jobs in other parts but with the war coming on I don t know W B Well it didn t but it made a difference to us in respect of it we were the first people to irrigate when the water became fresh Harold eventually irrigated sixty acres of pasture for the cows Interview with Syd SMITH Recorded July 2005 D Would you like to tell us the reason that the Barrage was built in the first place S The Barrages it was a part of the early agreement with the River Murray Commission that they started the first lot I think it was at Blanchetown and it

    Original URL path: http://www.lakesneedwater.org/feature/lower-lakes-local-history (2016-02-09)
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  • for-they-were-fishers-Lakes - Lakes Need Water
    there were plenty of cod in both lakes I made some wonderful catches in Lake Albert in 1909 as well as in Lake Alexandrina In 1914 there was a drought up the river That was when the reclaiming of the swamps took place and from that year we have had only three months good net fishing for cod the lake has gone more salt When there is no water flowing down the river up comes the salt water and they cod die out When the barrages are built the water here will be no better Locking has ruined the fishing in the home of the Murray cod and the further you go down the stream the worse the water gets because the settlers use it all the more In 1935 he said that he was then catching butterfish and mullet Two kinds of perch used to be plentiful and there are still a few about He was also catching mullet form June to September in his nets In 1916 they raised the minimum size mesh from four and a half to five inches and allowed only three months for the change to operate In fact he siad five and a half inch mesh was the smallest that they would buy in which to catch mulloway and eighteen inches was the minimum size mesh in which they caught butterfish We have an understanding when in the open water in the lake that one does not set a net closer than a mile from another They fished using eighteen to twenty four foot sailing boats rowing the nets around the schools of fish when wet the net weighed half a ton or they would set the nets Two men would use some one hundred by fifty yards of netting They would set sixteen nets each day rotating them so that all were dried at least once a week or else they would rot as they were made of cotton or for butterfish hemp Based at Wellington the Woodrow family fished the river and lakes The Amy was the first boat on the lakes to have a motor Dick Woodrow said This was installed in 1912 or thereabouts By 1915 the family owned three boats with motors the Edith Amy and Teddy Bear A number of boats used on the river were built by George Ross and his son Murray There were a few fishermen in the Coorong fishing for mullet in the lakes However after the barrages were built many turned to the Coorng for butterfish and mullet Dick and John Woodrow went to Goolwa three weeks out of four to be able to fish for callop and bream above the barrages and saltwater fish in the Coorong It was not worth fishing during he full of the moon Dick said From November to the end of February the fishermen used hauling nets to catch mulloway and after February they used set nets Tons and tons of fish were caught as schools

    Original URL path: http://www.lakesneedwater.org/feature/for-they-were-fishers-Lakes (2016-02-09)
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  • for they were fishers Coorong - Lakes Need Water
    this was done under sail only Dave Evans began fishing with his uncle on the Coorong and over the years became knowledgeable about the different fish species feeding habits and movements and the effects of tide and weather From the beginning Dave kept a diary which enabled him to pin point specific places where fish would be at specific times This gave him a name for being lucky but in fact it was minute observation and recordings that guided him After two years Dave began fishing on his own and gradually built up the range of gear that he felt was necessary to catch the right fish at the right time Gilling hauling and hooking were mixed depending on the time of the year the conditions and the advice of the diary tucked in his pocket World War II intervened and Dave married Sue Martin four days before leaving for overseas He was wounded twice in action and on his return to Australia he and Sue worked together to make a living from fishing although owing to lack of finance they seemed to be back at the beginning again having to make do with a fifteen foot boat with a three horsepower engine from which to set their nets in the Coorong They supplemented their income with cockling rabbiting and produce from the garden Sue continued to help set the nets until their son Ray was old enough to row a boat Tragically this their only chiild died at twenty eight in an accident Fishing was a family affair during Dave s thirty four years as a professional fisherman working firstly with his uncle and then with Sue and ray For the last seventeen years that he fished professionally Dave worked during the summer months with another fisherman Murray Burt as there is a lot of hauling to do during those months Dave and Murray were good friends and also fellow inspectors of fisheries for some years during the 1970s and 1980s Murray Burt and his wife Nita also fished together for many years Quiet careful fishing was Dave s way using sail before the war and even when faster boats became the norm he preferred to camp at a spot and listen to the fish and watch their movements to determine the direction in which they would head The biggest mulloway he ever caught weighed eighty seven pounds gutted and his biggest catch from a single haul was over nine tons taken in October 1957 This catch was made with a new hemp net just before Dave bought some of the nylon nets that were then being introduced It is the thirty mile stretch of the Coorong near Goolwa that is Dave Evan s favourite fishing ground and affter serving as Assistant Senior Inspector with the Deparment of Fisheries for six years and as Acting Senior Inspector for two it was to there that he retired in 1981 to fish as a recreational fisherman still with his diary in

    Original URL path: http://www.lakesneedwater.org/feature/for-they-were-fishers-coorong (2016-02-09)
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