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  • California Agriculture in the Classroom
    Us Contact Us Meet the Staff Board Members E newsletter Media Reports Teaching Resources Lesson Plans What s Growin On Ag Bites Fact Sheets School Gardens California Grows Map Teacher Resource Guide Learn About Ag Partnering Organizations Request Free Materials Purchase AITC Items Programs Events Story Writing Contest CA Conference University Student Teacher Program Seed Survivor Mobile Unit National Ag Week Summer Ag Institute Ag Literacy Calendar Budding Artists Grants Scholarships Literacy for Life Grants CA Conference Scholarships Look at Agriculture Organically Grants Other Grants Ways to Help Donate Thank You Sponsors In Kind Donations Volunteer 30 Year Events Student Center Students Imagine this Learn by Playing Teaching Resources National Agricultural Literacy Curriculum Matrix Search Lesson Plans Search Lesson Plans Grade Level Early Elementary Grades K 2 Upper Elementary Grades 3 5 Middle School Grades 6 8 High School Grades 9 12 Content Area Health Nutrition Science Social Studies Economics Geography History Agricultural Literacy Outcomes Agriculture and the Environment Culture Society Economy Geography Food Health and Lifestyle Plants and Animals for Food Fiber Energy Science Technology Engineering Math Common Core Connections Anchor Standards Reading Writing Speaking and Listening Language Practice Standards Mathematics State Specific Content for All States Alabama Alaska Arizona Arkansas California Colorado Connecticut Delaware District of Columbia Florida Georgia Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming NAITC NAITCO Submitted by a Specific State All States Alabama Alaska Arizona Arkansas California Colorado Connecticut Delaware District of Columbia Florida Georgia Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska

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  • California Agriculture in the Classroom
    Point to details they see in pictures State descriptive words they heard in the story Identify the front cover back cover title page author and illustrator of the book Point to upper and lower case letters you are working on Show classmates specific words you ask them to find on a page Tell you which parts of the story could be real and which parts are pretend Activity Two Rabbits Make a scatter graph of things your students already know about rabbits If possible invite 4 H or FFA rabbit owners to share their rabbits with your class Discuss eating habits diet breeds behaviors and care Perhaps one of your students has a rabbit that can be brought to class Teach and practice the Bunny Hop dance routine Have a Rabbit Food Taste Test where the children try different kinds of rabbit food lettuce parsley etc Record taste test results on graphs you prepare Discuss why rabbits are mammals and the characteristics of all mammals Conclude this activity by making a list of new information the students have learned about rabbits Activity Three The Garden Ask students What do we need to grow a garden What will we grow in our garden Make a scatter graph of items that can be grown in a garden Make a list of items the students need in order to plant a garden Seeds At a learning station with a parent volunteer have the children observe various types of seeds they could plant in their gardens Seeds may include pumpkin zucchini radish turnip carrot and parsley Possible discussion topics are stated below Discuss seed size and seed shape What do they look like What do they smell like Is there a relationship between seed size and plant size Which packages contain the most seeds The least seeds What are some benefits and challenges with planting small seeds Large seeds Making the Garden Assist students in making individual gardens Distribute one container a bottom of a water or milk jug to each student Have the students choose two types of seeds to plant in their personal gardens Have students make plant stakes for each seed they will plant by drawing a picture of the item on an index card with colored pencils Attach a tongue depressor to the back of the index card with duct or masking tape If you would like laminate the stakes or cover them with clear contact paper Set these aside for later use As a class prepare the soil by mixing top soil manure sterilized sand and vermiculite Speak with a local nursery about the quantities of each or buy a ready mix of potting soil While preparing the soil ask How does the sand feel The vermiculite The manure Is soil made of only one type of substance If you were digging in the soil in a farm field what might you find At planting time have each student place about 2 of gravel at the bottom of his

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  • California Agriculture in the Classroom
    but eat less Avoid oversize portions Make at least half your grains whole grains Switch to fat free or low fat milk Compare sodium in foods like soup bread and frozen meals Drink water instead of sugary drinks Make half your plate fruits and vegetables This lesson will focus on encouraging students to choose foods based on the MyPlate recommendations with special attention to making half their plate fruits and vegetables Interest Approach Engagement Ask your students to hold up five fingers Once they have their hand held up explain to them that just like we have five fingers there are five food groups that are a part of a healthy diet Ask students to help you list the five food groups Allow them to use their prior knowledge then give clues as needed Procedures Distribute the MyPlate handout to each student Briefly review the five food groups Have students write a one minute quick list of foods that could be listed in each food group Note Beans are unique because they fit in both the protein and the vegetable groups Have students share their answers and record them in a chart on the board Create a spelling list from select words Explain that this unit will focus on the fruits and vegetables food groups of MyPlate Show the students the tennis ball and the 1 cup measuring cup Explain that a tennis ball is approximately the size of one cup When they hear the term cup students can think of the tennis ball Show the students the dominoes and the 1 ounce measuring cup Explain that two dominoes are approximately the size of one ounce When they hear the term ounce students can think of the dominoes Review the MyServings handout Direct students to read aloud the information on serving size equivalents If possible provide visual aids Reiterate the recommended daily amount of fruits and vegetables Remind students that making fruits and vegetables the focal point of every meal will help them meet these recommended amounts each day Lead students through a discussion of five reasons why they should eat fruits and vegetables daily Discussion points may include Fruits and vegetables are the only source of vitamin C in the diet Vitamin C helps the body heal wounds and lowers the risk of infection It also helps keep the body from bruising and builds the tissue that holds muscles and bones together Vitamin C is also known as ascorbic acid and helps the body absorb the iron found in foods and strengthens the immune system Vitamin A is found in fruits and vegetables that are dark orange dark yellow or dark green Vitamin A serves several functions in the body It helps maintain good vision fight infection support cell growth and keep skin healthy Leafy greens carrots sweet potatoes squash spinach apricots and green peppers are all excellent sources of vitamin A Fruits and vegetables are a good source of complex carbohydrates whose energy release is slow gradual and

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  • California Agriculture in the Classroom
    continue so the earth s viability and sustainability are reviewed evaluated and maintained The Oxford American Dictionary defines a pest as a troublesome or annoying thing or an organism that is destructive to another organism The United States Environmental Protection Agency EPA defines an agricultural pest as an unwanted organism a living thing that competes with people for food and fiber attacks people or livestock directly or annoys or otherwise affects aesthetic human values Your students should develop a definition that is meaningful to them Living organisms may be pests at certain times or in certain places but harmless or beneficial in other situations Discuss this fact as students complete their role plays Also discuss that our society can determine which living organisms are pests An example of this is that insects or fungi that cause visual but not nutritional defects in fruits and vegetables are often controlled because the public currently prefers eye appealing fruit Pest management is an important component of agricultural production and healthy living situations in the home In this activity your students will learn about certain home and agricultural pests and how they are controlled With few exceptions living organisms require air food water and shelter for survival In this activity the students will be asked to create a pest and a habitat for their pest Prior to creative group work you may choose to discuss the habitats of several agricultural pests listed in the background information and student readings Remind the students of Integrated Pest Management IPM This strategy encourages the farmer to look at each situation individually and to use what is best environmentally and economically Interest Approach Engagement Perform a focus activity with your students to determine what they already know about pests and what they want to learn about pests Some possible activities include A five minute writing assignment answering the question What is a pest A class brainstorm answering the questions What do we already know about pests and What do we want to learn about pests dReading the story or watching the video of The Tale of Peter Rabbit or The Tale of Benjamin Bunny by Beatrix Potter and then discussing the pests in the story Peter Rabbit Mr MacGregor Procedures Activity 1 What a Pest Place students into groups of four to six Have each group brainstorm and select a possible pest role play or assign a role play from one of the scenarios included in the Essential Files Have each group create a role play of their scenario Encourage little or no talking by the actors The group should show the following in their role play The pest that is causing the problem The damage or problem the pest causes How others try to get rid of the pest How the organism can be beneficial or harmless Have the students practice their role play for 3 5 minutes and then present their role play to the class They are not to tell the audience the name of the pest At the end of each presentation have the audience make guesses as to the name of the pest After all of the presentations develop a definition for the word pest Discuss other definitions as mentioned in the background information Write the class definition for the word pest on sentence strips or tag board and post it on the wall in a prominent place where all students can refer to it Variations Describe a pest without stating its name and have the students guess what the pest is Complete a chart similar to the one below Activity 2 Quit Pestering Us Determine the number of students in your class Place one apple for each of your students in a box or basket Make sure the apples have a variety of appearances bruised discolored unusually shaped shiny large small etc Have each student choose an apple Have the students explain why they chose the apples they did Was it because of size Appearance Potential taste Discuss how people influence what type of food the agricultural community produces Emphasize that public opinion does impact agricultural production What is important nutritional value Food that is safe to eat Appearance Price Have a class discussion concerning the need for people to control pests Be sure to discuss the need for farmers to control pests as well as the need for homeowners to control pests Some key discussion points may include Why people find it necessary to control pests What would happen if certain pests were not controlled by humans How weather affects pest incidence or crop susceptibility heat frost flooding etc How changes such as urbanization in an ecosystem impact the need to control pests What would happen if one pest were completely eliminated Is it important to keep a minimal number of every pest Divide the students into six groups Distribute a different Pest Management Reading Sheet to each group Have students follow the procedure below or create a lesson of your own Individually quietly read the assigned information sheet Orally re read the information sheet as a group In groups determine at least five interesting facts you learned about the pest Write down and or illustrate the facts on butcher paper Finally have the students present what they learned to the class Show students different traps that are used in agriculture to analyze what pests are in the orchards fields and homes Do not forget to include a mouse trap in your collection Discuss the functions of the traps They are used to identify pests determine pest populations and or reduce the number of a particular pest Many sample traps are available from your county s Agricultural Commissioner s Office Have the students design and construct an insect observation chamber they will hang or place in their yard and examine for insects One possible insect observation chamber is described in the attached file Making an Insect Observation Chamber Some possible discussions prior to this lesson may include Insect diet Insect anatomy

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  • California Agriculture in the Classroom
    food The remaining lessons can be found at the following links Why People Need Plants Dig Em Up Snappy Stems Luscious Leaves Fabulous Flowers Freshest Fruits Supreme Seeds Edible Plant Game Eat Em Up Everything we eat and most of the things we use in our daily lives come directly or indirectly from plants In addition to growing plants that we eat every day farmers and ranchers grow plants that produce material we need like fiber for clothing and wood for paper pencils and the homes we live in The United States has a rich history in agriculture and continues to play a large role in feeding the people of our country In fact California is the largest food and agricultural economy in the nation Farming has changed a lot over the past one hundred years Your grandparents or great grandparents might have grown up on farms where their families raised much of their own food but today most of us rely upon the 2 of people who live on farms in the United States to grow and produce food for the rest of us Modern technology like tractors and irrigation systems have made it possible for farmers to produce more food for more people on less land One thing that has stayed the same however is that family farmers are still working hard to grow healthy and affordable food for all of us who don t live on farms Interest Approach Engagement Ask students to list three items you use every day Trace each of those items back to a plant by drawing a picture Examples could include a house or building which is made using wood harvested from a tree food items such as fruit vegetables and grains are plants that we eat Animals and animal products such as meat and wool can be traced back to plants because the animals eat plants In this lesson students will learn the importance of plants and that people depend upon plants for food fiber shelter fuel and clean air Procedures Activity 1 Make space on the board or hang a piece of chart paper in front of the room Ask students to help you make a list of things that people get from plants List and discuss each item Below is an example Food vegetables fruit meat eggs dairy etc Oxygen plants make this through photosynthesis Clothing cotton jeans flax and rayon fabric Medicine herbal teas cancer treatment medicines developed from bark of the Yew tree active ingredient in aspirin was developed from the bark of willow trees etc Paper from wood pulp Furniture lumber from trees Cosmetics plant dyes plant oil fragrances nut shell exfoliants in facial wash etc Energy sources biofuel firewood etc Shelter lumber from trees and straw bales for homes Review the list with students and emphasize that plants make up the base of the food chain by gathering sunlight energy and turning it into food for themselves and other living organisms Ask students if we

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  • California Agriculture in the Classroom
    Literacy for Life Grants CA Conference Scholarships Look at Agriculture Organically Grants Other Grants Ways to Help Donate Thank You Sponsors In Kind Donations Volunteer 30 Year Events Student Center Students Imagine this Learn by Playing About Us Contact Us Meet the Staff Board Members E newsletter Media Reports Teaching Resources Lesson Plans What s Growin On Ag Bites Fact Sheets School Gardens California Grows Map Teacher Resource Guide Learn About Ag Partnering Organizations Request Free Materials Purchase AITC Items Programs Events Story Writing Contest CA Conference University Student Teacher Program Seed Survivor Mobile Unit National Ag Week Summer Ag Institute Ag Literacy Calendar Budding Artists Grants Scholarships Literacy for Life Grants CA Conference Scholarships Look at Agriculture Organically Grants Other Grants Ways to Help Donate Thank You Sponsors In Kind Donations Volunteer 30 Year Events Student Center Students Imagine this Learn by Playing Teaching Resources WE Garden Lesson Packet By Mandi Bottoms May 2009 Grade 1 6 Subjects Science Mathematics English Language Arts Health Nutrition Download entire lesson plan PDF 9 8 MB Seed Match PDF 212 KB My Life as a Fruit or Vegetable PDF 167 KB Eat Your Plants PDF 162 KB Frozen Canned or Fresh PDF

    Original URL path: http://www.learnaboutag.org/resources/table_we.cfm (2016-04-26)
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  • California Agriculture in the Classroom
    Reports Teaching Resources Lesson Plans What s Growin On Ag Bites Fact Sheets School Gardens California Grows Map Teacher Resource Guide Learn About Ag Partnering Organizations Request Free Materials Purchase AITC Items Programs Events Story Writing Contest CA Conference University Student Teacher Program Seed Survivor Mobile Unit National Ag Week Summer Ag Institute Ag Literacy Calendar Budding Artists Grants Scholarships Literacy for Life Grants CA Conference Scholarships Look at Agriculture Organically Grants Other Grants Ways to Help Donate Thank You Sponsors In Kind Donations Volunteer 30 Year Events Student Center Students Imagine this Learn by Playing Teaching Resources Bon à la Beef California Foundation for Agriculture in the Classroom partnered with California Beef Council to create four professional video clips featuring elementary through high school students preparing recipes to educate students teachers and the public about beef its nutritional value and its proper handling and preparation The student developed recipes use easy techniques and readily available ingredients Each of the four cooking video clips are paired with educational lesson plans that are aligned to Common Core State Standards for California Public Schools for students in grades 3 5 6 8 and 9 12 Cattle in California History Grades 3 5

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  • California Agriculture in the Classroom
    are the larval form of the mealworm beetle a species of darkling beetle They go through four life stages egg larva pupa and adult Interest Approach Engagement Have students brainstorm the senses they use to interact with the world around them Ask students to close their eyes and use their remaining senses hearing taste touch and smell to observe their current environment Facilitate this interaction by prompting them to notice their surroundings with the following questions What do you feel What do you smell What do you hear Ask students to open their eyes and briefly discuss their observations Explain that by making observations they are acting as animal physiologists The word physiologist comes from the Greek word physis meaning nature or natural and ologist which means one who studies Animal physiologists make observations or study how animals naturally interact within their environment Environment is a term that describes the surroundings or conditions in which a person animal or plant lives or operates An animal s environment can positively or negatively affect the animal s well being An animal physiologist works to make sure that an animal s environment includes the ideal temperature air flow and shelter they need to be healthy Remind students that animals can t explain how they feel so it is essential that an animal physiologist have excellent observation skills Explain to students that in this lesson they will identify basic animal behaviors and hypothesize what causes them and discover the responsibilities of an animal physiologist Procedures Activity 1 Observing a Mealworm After completing the Interest Approach Motivator tell students that today they are going to be animal physiologists Their first responsibility is to evaluate the environmental preferences of mealworms the larval stage of the darkling beetle To determine these preferences they will experiment with different temperatures lighting and surface textures and observe how the mealworms respond Divide students into small groups and distribute the materials Instruct students to observe their mealworms using a hand lens and record their findings on the My Observations section of the Significant Surroundings Lab handout If needed guide observation with the following questions How many segments does your mealworm have How many legs does it have Does a mealworm have antennae Can you see the mouthparts How do we know the mealworm is the larval stage of an insect and not a true worm How does the mealworm move In this lab students will carry out three different experiments to test the environmental preferences of mealworms Each half of the shoebox will offer the mealworms a different environment to choose Students will record their findings on the Significant Surroundings Lab handout Instruct students to complete the lab activities Assist and clarify as necessary Activity 2 Making a Graphic Organizer Building on the discoveries made in Activity 1 students will choose a livestock animal an animal raised in an agricultural setting to produce food fiber or labor to research and create a guide for their ideal environmental conditions which may include

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