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    Original URL path: /wp/wp-content/uploads/2016/01/BrightSpots-January-13-2016.docx (2016-02-12)


  • Knockout Bloom: Blackberry lily; Belamcanda chinensis - Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden
    that the blackberry lily Belamcanda chinensis got its name from the blackberry colored specks on the flower petals But one day I was strolling through the Asian Valley and as I walked by the blackberry lilies I saw what looked like a blackberry fruit growing from that very same plant Amazing Did you know that s why they call it a blackberry lily The fruit of the blackberry lily Image of blackberry lily fruit courtesy of http www flickr com photos martinlabar 1797518117 About Jonah Holland Jonah Holland is PR Marketing Coordinator at Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden specializing in social media She s been known to go for a walk and come back completely inspired to write a blog post on her newest found adventure You May Also Like Winter Interest Inspiration Education Nature California Dreaming Spring like Day Blooms Pingback Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden Blog Archive Knockout Bloom Blackberry Lily Don t Miss Out Subscribe to the Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden Blog Posts by Topic Blooms Gardens Community Kitchen Garden Education Classes Events Families Kids Gardening Horticulture Gardens Through the Seasons Making a Difference in the Community More about the Garden Sustainable Practices Uncategorized Recent Posts Winter Interest Inspiration

    Original URL path: http://www.lewisginter.org/knockout-bloom-blackberry-lily-belamcanda-chinensis/ (2016-02-12)
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  • Osmanthus
    Sep 27th 2014 Osmanthus by Jonah Holland Osmanthus blooms attract pollinators with their fragrance too Pictured Osmanthus x fortunei Fruitlandii It s hard to believe such a small delicate flower can have such a heavenly fragrance You ll find the Osmanthus in the Asian Valley or just across the Lotus Bridge between Bloemendaal House and the Children s Garden or you can just follow your nose About Jonah Holland Jonah Holland is PR Marketing Coordinator at Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden specializing in social media She s been known to go for a walk and come back completely inspired to write a blog post on her newest found adventure You May Also Like Winter Interest Inspiration Education Nature California Dreaming Spring like Day Blooms Don t Miss Out Subscribe to the Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden Blog Posts by Topic Blooms Gardens Community Kitchen Garden Education Classes Events Families Kids Gardening Horticulture Gardens Through the Seasons Making a Difference in the Community More about the Garden Sustainable Practices Uncategorized Recent Posts Winter Interest Inspiration Education Nature California Dreaming De Lighting Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden Spring like Day Blooms Most Popular 5 Tips Visiting Busy GardenFest Garden s E news Sign Up Mulch

    Original URL path: http://www.lewisginter.org/knockout-bloom-frangrance-osmanthus/ (2016-02-12)
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  • Osmanthus Surprise - Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden
    I couldn t see any nearby And then I looked up There it was over my head the tiny white blooms that make such as sweet summer like fragrance A smell like that is so unexpected in the fall when shrubs and trees die back with glorious fall colors and then shut down till spring This stand of four large Osmanthus heterophyllus has been pruned to arch over the sidewalk with lower branches pruned away so they form a canopy over your head Thank goodness for shrubs like Osmanthus and other fall bloomers They give us something to look forward to as summer fades away Osmanthus arch Recently I was knocked over by a big spread of Colchicum in the Healing Garden Not literally knocked over I m much bigger than they were but visually Their little bulbs lay in wait all summer waiting for the summer show off plants to be done And then they jumped in front of a yew hedge and put on a show A couple of things to take from this missive remember to look up and down in a garden All kinds of surprises await when we look beyond eye level and that fall and winter seasons offer a lot of star power in a garden More reasons to become a member of Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden where there s a show going on somewhere all year round A single fall crocus colchicum About Janet Woody I am the librarian at Lewis Ginter and like to talk and read about plants I also enjoying researching Lewis Ginter and our founder Grace Arents Visit me in the library and we ll talk about plants or history or some other fun topic You May Also Like Winter Interest Spring like Day Blooms Preparing Plants for Snow

    Original URL path: http://www.lewisginter.org/osmanthus-surprise/ (2016-02-12)
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  • Gardening: Ornamental Grass to the Rescue - Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden
    turf enable ornamental grass to better tolerate drought conditions The longer roots also encourage infiltration of rainwater into the local water table which helps improve water quality and reduces stormwater runoff Flowering perennials provide a nice complement to ornamental grasses including this hardy dwarf fountain grass Don Williamson Ornamental grasses may be a better choice than trees and shrubs in several conditions said Grace Chapman director of horticulture at Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden The grasses like poor soils such as our area s clay heavy soil and they typically don t need fertilizer Many varieties rated for zone 7 are hardy perennials reducing or even eliminating the need for annual plantings For property owners this can equate to less maintenance and expense Since mature grasses can be divided for propagation of more plants gardens also can be expanded without additional costs Wildlife welcomes the switch from turf to ornamental grass While birds rely on the grasses for food thick clumps of growth provide cover shelter and nesting sites encouraging a more robust local ecosystem Beyond practical reasons there are aesthetic bonuses for incorporating ornamental grasses in the landscape Their beauty provides ever changing visual interest through all four seasons With warm season grasses new growth appears in spring stalks and plumes serve as focal points in summer and changing colors announce autumn And unlike turf at the end of the year their texture and form provide structure in winter s bare bones landscape Even with Richmond s formal architecture and landscapes ornamental grasses can find a home They can be very structured and classic or more naturalistic for a meadow effect Chapman said There are so many varieties to choose from so do your homework to achieve the effect you want Many ornamental grasses like this sedge acknowledge autumn with eye catching hues Photo by Don Williamson Selections can range from cool to warm season growth habits sunny to shade loving dry to wet preferences solid hued to variegated foliages and upright to arching forms Design flexibility also stems from varying heights at maturity ranging from low growing grasses for groundcovers to tall grasses for screens and backdrops Most ornamental grasses are striking additions whether planted in large expanses or mixed with annuals and other perennials They can even be prominently positioned as an exclamation point in the landscape Chapman said Ornamental grasses add a completely different element to the environment and they re enchanting as they blow in the breeze Ornamental grasses grow near the water at Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden with the Tree House reflected in the background Photo by Lucky Ginger Studio Sampling of Zone 7 Ornamental Grasses Low height Flame grass prairie dropseed ribbon grass sedge Dwarf varieties medium height Blue oatgrass blue fescue feather reedgrass little bluestem muhly grass purple love grass switchgrass zebragrass Tall height big bluestem fountain grass maiden grass pampas grass ravennagrass Editor s Note This article first published in the Richmond Times Dispatch in October 2014 In terms of color form

    Original URL path: http://www.lewisginter.org/gardening-ornamental-grass-to-the-rescue/ (2016-02-12)
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  • Top ornamental grass
    up the newly planted Grass Garden The speed of the installation was a testimony to careful planning coordination and hard work by numerous staff and volunteers Visitors on Tuesday afternoon saw hundreds of small flags marking the planting plan Visitors on Thursday morning saw a beautiful new grass garden See a photo gallery of the Grass Garden installation on the Richmond Times Dispatch website Prairie Dropseed Sporobolus herterolepis Which ornamental grasses did we choose As with most gardening initiatives the project took planning time and patience Two years ago we began trialing seven ornamental grasses taking care to choose non invasive varieties and those native to the United States Three were selected based on criteria including performance and desired color form and height They include Panicum virgatum Northwind also 2014 Perennial Plant of the Year Prairie Dropseed Sporobolus herterolepis and Pink Muhlygrass Muhlenbergia capillaris Sharp eyes will notice there s a placeholder for a fourth grass in the back of the display Pink Muhlygrass Muhlenbergia capillaris We re currently searching for the best non invasive accent grass in terms of size and availability Panicum virgatum Northwind Traditional turf certainly has its uses The idea is to encourage people to think of alternatives that are environmentally friendly require less maintenance and beautiful We hope you ll visit often and find splendor in our ornamental grass About Beth Monroe Beth Monroe is public relations and marketing director at Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden She feels honored to be part of a team connecting people and plants to improve our community You May Also Like California Dreaming Volcanoes vs Doughnuts Preparing Plants for Snow Gardening Trends for 2016 http clarentine com Chris Coen Lovely to see these excellent native grasses given star billing I look forward to seeing the Sporobolus planting as it fills

    Original URL path: http://www.lewisginter.org/3-top-ornamental-grasses-tips-to-improve-your-lawn/ (2016-02-12)
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  • buckeyes
    splitting open and dropping from the tree Inside the gnarly unglamorous hull is the most perfectly smooth nut You can t help but roll it around in your hand And wouldn t you know the nut it is said to be named a buckeye because the coloration dark shiny chestnut brown with a lighter center looks similar to the eye of a buck male deer One other thing I ve learned about the buckeye nut since working at Lewis Ginter is that they are considered to be good luck Some say carrying one in your pocket will bring you more pocket change Others say keeping them close at hand will relieve pain of arthritis and rheumatism I personally don t carry one around in my pocket because I m sure it would end up in the washing machine so I have to hold out hope that eating the chocolate and peanut butter confectionary buckeye is going to bring me some good luck Here is my favorite recipe for Buckeye Balls which is an easy no bake project This recipe was passed along to me by a family friend and then I adapted it Kids love helping to roll the peanut butter balls Buckeye Ball candy on the left buckeye nuts which are not edible on the right 1 1 2 cups creamy peanut butter 1 2 cup butter softened 1 teaspoon vanilla extract 3 cups confectioners sugar 6 ounces chocolate chips I prefer dark chocolate but any will do 1 tablespoon coconut oil or shortening Directions 1 In a medium bowl combine peanut butter butter vanilla and confectioners sugar with a mixer Roll into balls using a heaping tablespoon of dough for each ball Place on a baking sheet lined with waxed paper Refrigerate until firm 2 Place coconut oil and chocolate chips in a small glass bowl Microwave for 1 minute and stir If needed microwave at additional one minute intervals stir between each until chocolate is smooth and without lumps 3 Remove balls from refrigerator Insert a wooden toothpick into a ball and dip into melted chocolate Make sure to leave some of the peanut butter showing Return to wax paper chocolate side down and remove toothpick Smooth over toothpick hole if desired Repeat with remaining balls 4 Refrigerate until chocolate is set Eat and enjoy Please note Buckeye tree nuts are not edible We placed them on the plate with the candy so you could compare their similar appearance About Jonah Holland Jonah Holland is PR Marketing Coordinator at Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden specializing in social media She s been known to go for a walk and come back completely inspired to write a blog post on her newest found adventure You May Also Like Through the Eyes of a Child Recycle Nature s Bounty by Making Distinctive Papers A Timeless Botanical Garden DIY Fish Decorations http pbmonet blogspot com Paula Blair Dabbs Awww you re making this Ohio girl homesick Ohio is known as the Buckeye

    Original URL path: http://www.lewisginter.org/its-buckeye-season/ (2016-02-12)
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  • Meet the New Children's Garden Staff
    t recognize Manassas anymore The farmhouse near Bull Run that I lived in as a kid was on the site of a current VRE commuter rail station The land where I used to see cows corn and barn with a big silo is literally a huge parking lot now for people who want to take the train to DC What part of Richmond do you live in I am proud to say that I live in Ginter Park The community there is quite very eclectic I really love the way the neighborhood has grown changed and thrived from the time Lewis Ginter conceived of the idea of developing Ginter Park I am so enamored by the idea that the community visions of Lewis Ginter and Grace Arents are still in place I go the Lewis Ginter Recreation Center almost every day in the summer Grace Arents started it In many ways this center really needs an update but that does not stop the community from going there all the time That is crazy to me sort of magical If you could have one super power what would it be I would like to time travel just to observe not to change anything Kevin Ratliff Children s Garden Educator in one of his favorite spots at Lewis Ginter the 100 year old mulberry tree Kevin Ratliff Children s Garden Educator As an Educator in the Children s Garden I teach and assist in running our programs for preschool and elementary school aged visitors including Young Buds Discovery Programs and Green Adventure Summer Camp Being a member of the teaching team I hope to inspire a love and interest in nature through our many plant and wildlife based programs What is your favorite part of the garden My favorite part of the garden would have to be the Asian Valley I love the balance of stillness and movement water and earth shade and sun plant and animal life There is both vibrancy with the seasonal changes in plants and flowers and constancy in the evergreens and conifers that frame the water s edge and garden paths Since working in the Children s Garden I have loved seeing the excitement on the children s faces when they first see the pond in the upper Asian Valley along with the fish turtles and other wildlife that live there Where did you work before you came to Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden I have worked in a number of places throughout my life Most recently the Great Big Greenhouse a nursery and garden center here in Richmond There I received a crash course in plant identification and horticulture that has been a great aid to my teaching in the Children s Garden My primary field of work over the last seven years has been in wilderness therapy and adventure education At Four Circles Recovery Center and Blackwater Outdoor Experiences I filled the role of wilderness guide mentor and therapist Working for Boulder Valley School District s

    Original URL path: http://www.lewisginter.org/meet-the-new-kids-garden-staff/ (2016-02-12)
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