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  • Roxy Hojat, Author at Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden
    Leadership History News Employment Contact Us Roxy Hojat About Roxy Hojat Jan 29th 2016 Student Teacher Art Show As I walk through the Botanical Illustration Art Student and Teacher Exhibition at Ginter Gallery II I see a contrast to the blanket of white snow just outside the windows of the gallery a spectrum of color and intricate yet delicate textures I can t help but feel as if I am walking through the seasons and Read More Don t Miss Out Subscribe to the Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden Blog Artist Talk Judy Thomas Botanical Illustration Instructor Join us for an artist talk about John Bartram Learn More Student Teacher s Exhibition Visit Gallery II for our current exhibition Learn More Botanical Illustration Certificate Program Earn a botanical illustration certificate Posts by Topic Blooms Gardens Community Kitchen Garden Education Classes Events Families Kids Gardening Horticulture Gardens Through the Seasons Making a Difference in the Community More about the Garden Sustainable Practices Uncategorized Recent Posts Winter Interest Inspiration Education Nature California Dreaming De Lighting Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden Spring like Day Blooms Most Popular 5 Tips Visiting Busy GardenFest Garden s E news Sign Up Mulch Mulching in Winter Feed me Seymour

    Original URL path: http://www.lewisginter.org/author/roxy-hojat/ (2016-02-13)
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  • Happy Snow Day! - Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden
    Day by Jonah Holland by Jonah Holland PR Marketing Coordinator Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden At the start of the snowstorm frogs in the fountain Photo by Laura Flournoy We got a bit of snow last night considerably more than is in this photo Visitor Service staffer Laura Flournoy took this image just before the Garden closed about 4 30 p m Six to 8 inches later with temperatures around 20 degrees and with the Garden and paths covered we will remain closed to visitors today Tuesday Feb 17 2015 and Wednesday Feb 18 2015 Enjoy the snow day and stay safe We ll reopen as soon as paths are clear and it is safe to do so The Conservatory at Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden after the snow UPDATE Here are our first photos of the Conservatory after the snow storm Thanks to Facility Maintenance Manager Steve Sawyer who braved the snow to take this photo and to Visitor Services Coordinator Robin Gregson for sending it along About Jonah Holland Jonah Holland is PR Marketing Coordinator at Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden specializing in social media She s been known to go for a walk and come back completely inspired to write a blog post on her newest found adventure You May Also Like Tricks Treats Wildflowers Heralds of Spring Southern Icon s Ancient Secret A Rainbow of A Million Blooms Don t Miss Out Subscribe to the Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden Blog Posts by Topic Blooms Gardens Community Kitchen Garden Education Classes Events Families Kids Gardening Horticulture Gardens Through the Seasons Making a Difference in the Community More about the Garden Sustainable Practices Uncategorized Recent Posts Winter Interest Inspiration Education Nature California Dreaming De Lighting Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden Spring like Day Blooms Most Popular 5 Tips Visiting Busy GardenFest Garden

    Original URL path: http://www.lewisginter.org/happy-snow-day/ (2016-02-13)
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  • Snow Day - Take 2! - Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden
    2015 Snow Day Take 2 by Jonah Holland by Jonah Holland Public Relations Marketing Coordinator Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden Japanese maple Sango Kaku in snow with the Conservatory Thanks to Facility Maintenance Manager Steve Sawyer for the photo Here s a first look at the Garden after the snow storm The Garden remains closed today Feb 26 2015 due to snow and ice About Jonah Holland Jonah Holland is PR Marketing Coordinator at Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden specializing in social media She s been known to go for a walk and come back completely inspired to write a blog post on her newest found adventure You May Also Like Tricks Treats Wildflowers Heralds of Spring Southern Icon s Ancient Secret A Rainbow of A Million Blooms Don t Miss Out Subscribe to the Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden Blog Posts by Topic Blooms Gardens Community Kitchen Garden Education Classes Events Families Kids Gardening Horticulture Gardens Through the Seasons Making a Difference in the Community More about the Garden Sustainable Practices Uncategorized Recent Posts Winter Interest Inspiration Education Nature California Dreaming De Lighting Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden Spring like Day Blooms Most Popular 5 Tips Visiting Busy GardenFest Garden s E news

    Original URL path: http://www.lewisginter.org/snow-day-take-2/ (2016-02-13)
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  • Bananas Growing in RVA? - Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden
    and bananas so much we wanted to share it with you Enjoy Did you know the effort to protect tender plants in inhospitable climates goes back to antiquity Remnants of greenhouses have been identified in Pompeii where the glass used was probably translucent stone Orangeries were first developed in the 15th century to protect these and other tender citrus plants The first orangeries were wooden buildings with shutters but by the 17th century they became quite ornate masonry structures with windows on the south facing wall The construction of the freestanding greenhouse or conservatory with windows and roof made of glass became possible in the 19th century with technical advances in glassmaking and framing Joseph Paxton head gardener for the Duke of Devonshire designed a conservatory at Chatsworth that was the largest in the world at the time It rose 67 feet high spanning a width of 123 feet and was 277 feet long covering an acre of ground Paxton referred to it as the great stove and it was here that he succeeded in growing the first banana to fruit Musa cavendishii in England in May of 1836 Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden s conservatory has Musa acuminata Sumatrana fruiting right now in the East Wing the orchid wing Be sure to look for it while you are admiring all the holiday decorations at Dominion GardenFest of Lights or during a daytime visit Sources from the Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden Lora Robins Library Glasshouses and Wintergardens of the Nineteenth Century S Koppelkamm 1981 NA 8360 K66 A Century of Gardeners B Massgingham 1982 SB61 M37 The Busiest Man in England K Colquhoun 2006 DA 565 P18 C65 About Jonah Holland Jonah Holland is PR Marketing Coordinator at Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden specializing in social media She s been known to

    Original URL path: http://www.lewisginter.org/bananas-growing-in-rva/ (2016-02-13)
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  • Living Gifts Keep on Giving - Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden
    drinker with flavorful herbs such as mint chamomile or lemon balm planted as living gifts in a decorative teapot Cooks may enjoy a kitchen planter of Italian herbs hot peppers or zesty spices For the cat lover on your gift list plant some catnip in a kitty cat mug A business professional may enjoy a tabletop garden of living gifts for his or her desk Easy to care for plants may work best such as miniature cacti and small props can symbolize hobbies and interests Naturalists may welcome landscapes en miniature for indoor display Evergreen seedlings provide year round greenery while tiny pinecones acorns and dried seed pods tucked around the plant base add texture and interest Glass jars show the layering process and add interest to DIY living gifts A specialty glass embellished with the logo of a favorite restaurant or entertainment venue can be filled with soil and tiny plants as a living gift doubling lasting memento of good times shared If the recipient not you has the green thumb consider giving a planting kit with amaryllis paperwhite or narcissus bulbs or a DIY planter accompanied by separate packages of pebbles humus fertilizer and seeds PRESENTATIONS Such unique living gifts deserve unique presentations Wrap or embellish the planting container with freshly cut leaves layered around the container and cinched with roping or holiday ribbon funky sock leg warmer or stocking hat stretched over the container s bottom and sides scrapbooking or homemade paper folded up the sides and secured with themed stickers ragged burlap accompanied by a raffia bow nature themed scarf or bandanna GIFTS TAGS A personalized holiday greeting can be written on a tiny chalkboard tucked in the arrangement seed pack tied to the bow miniature watering can or shovel from a craft store s dollhouse

    Original URL path: http://www.lewisginter.org/livinggifts/ (2016-02-13)
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  • Cypress knees
    knee on record is 14 feet found on a tree growing on the shore of the Suwannee River which flows through Georgia and Florida The knees are generally solid but can become hollow over time as they rot In cypress plantations knees grow on trees as young as 12 years old Even though they are conifers bald cypress trees are not evergreen They lose their leaves every autumn as their name suggests and grow new ones in spring They are related to the redwoods and sequoias that grow in California Highly resistant to rot the heartwood wood of mature trees has historically been valuable for construction fence posts doors flooring and caskets as well as ornamental carving But because they are slow growing cypress is rarely harvested for timber today Bald cypresses are slow growing trees that can live to be 600 years old Our trees at Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden were planted in 1993 The species is well adapted to wet conditions along riverbanks and swamps They are native to the southeastern United States growing in the Mississippi Valley drainage basin along the Gulf Coast and up the coastal plain to the Mid Atlantic States They are also found in dry areas and are frequently planted as ornamental trees Trap Pond State Park in Delaware has the northernmost stand of bald cypress in the United States Closer to home there are tidal bald cypress forests and woodlands of note in the Chickahominy River in Charles City James City and New Kent counties In the wild cypress trees play a very important role in soaking up floodwaters and preventing soil erosion Environmentalists love them for their ability to trap pollutants Frogs toads and salamanders prefer cypress swamps for breeding grounds Wood ducks nest in hollow trunks and catfish spawn in submerged hollow logs while bees wood ducks barrel owls and raptors nest in the treetops In the Children s Garden you can re assemble a cypress knee that we have sliced into sections It s not as easy as it looks Botanists have proposed many theories about the purpose of these peculiar knees According to Cypress Knees an Enduring Enigma published by the Arnold Arboretum at Harvard University it has variously been thought that the knees were key to collecting oxygen accumulating nutrients or storing carbohydrates all functions vital to a tree s survival Mechanical support has also been proposed a reason for the knobby knees perhaps helping anchor their host s roots in the soft muddy soil where they like to grow But one by one each of these theories has been disproved either in laboratory tests or simply by removing the knees of swamp dwelling specimens which continue to thrive without them I like to think they are the calcified remains of ancient dragon spines converted to tiny homes for water loving elves They could be underachieving stalagmites there for clever dwarfs to harvest and make torches clubs and musical instruments Or perhaps they are simply unicorn hatchlings

    Original URL path: http://www.lewisginter.org/trees-with-knees/ (2016-02-13)
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  • Spider Webs
    bumpy gourds and pumpkins and delight in mushrooms fungus and insectivorous plants The most fun When we find oddities that we didn t plant or plan on On a recent rainy walk from the Children s Garden to the Robins Visitors Center I was stopped in my tracks by a shrub that I walk by almost every day The variegated boxwood looked like something straight out of a haunted house absolutely covered in sparkly spider webs What was making them sparkle The gentle rain was clinging to the thin strands highlighting each intricate layer of web As I peered closer I found all different sizes of perfect spheres of water seemingly defying gravity Each one was reflecting a teeny tiny picture of the Garden Unfortunately there were no guests nearby no enthusiastic children to share in the discovery As I got closer my amazement grew I discovered perfect spheres of water reflecting tiny images of the Garden So I m sharing my discovery now The next time cool gray misty days are getting you down take a walk and search for your own sparkly spider web magic What if you can t wait for the next moody fall day Invite someone to go on a spider search with you preferably someone who is delighted by all things creepy crawly Fill a spray bottle with water find a densely packed shrub with small leaves and spray away until the spider webs are revealed And if you absolutely cannot find someone else to delight in your discoveries stop by the Children s Garden this October where you re sure to find a fan of spiders rainy days and nature s most amazing oddities The sight that stopped me in my tracks the unassuming variegated boxwood covered in spider webs About Kristin Thoroman

    Original URL path: http://www.lewisginter.org/sparkling-spider-webs/ (2016-02-13)
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  • Summer Plant Displays
    Impact The Garden s front gate is one of my favorite places for inspiration It s full sun location has to look great throughout the entire summer while requiring minimal maintenance Coleus lantana and celosia did the heavy lifting this year with colors that were hot hot hot The horticulture department pinched back the coleus to keep it thick and they also deadheaded the coleus once in the middle of summer to encourage a second bloom 2 Tempting Tropicals I love the way the Garden has started using interesting and vibrant tropical plants in annual displays Our guests seem to enjoy it too the elephant ears Colocasia esculenta Elepaio on the Main Garden Path were a big hit this summer one guest said he felt like he was in dinosaur land Bromeliads such as the one pictured Aechmea blanchetiana also added bright color and interesting texture 3 Plants as Edging Okay so every year I line my plants up in front of the house Boring This year I noticed the Garden s displays had circles of coleus And right in the center was a contrasting plant either a different color or a spiky texture You can see the technique here with coleus Solenostemon scutellarioides Pineapple Definitely on my list to try for next year 4 Great Grasses When the Garden decided to remove turf in front of one of its most visible buildings the Conservatory it was making a statement that ornamental grasses can provide a beautiful and more environmentally friendly alternative to lawns Now one year later there s a purple haze of purple pink muhlygrass Muhlenbergia capillaris and the results are stunning 5 Light and Dark Come over to the dark side Bright color is great but sometimes white blooms and dark foliage create dramatic effects Here wispy

    Original URL path: http://www.lewisginter.org/top-5-summer-plant-displays/ (2016-02-13)
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