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  • Families & Kids
    based artist displaying fiber art exploring seeds of trees and shrubs through the traditions of quilting botanical illustration and watercolor While her Read More Sep 30th 2011 October Oddities Begins with Weird Plant Lore by Garrett McLees Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden PR Marketing Intern In my last post I wrote about my journey to the Children s Garden and my short vacation to the tree house in the Children s Garden I also introduced Gourd Quest the exclusive gourd themed segment of Kids Quest held at the Children s Garden throughout the month of Read More Sep 28th 2011 My Welcome to the Garden Journey to Gourd Quest by Garrett McLees Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden PR Marketing Intern Hi I m Garrett McLees the new PR marketing intern here at Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden A hardworking and studious graduate of Virginia Tech I take every job seriously and do my best in whatever I do Last week my first at the Garden Read More Sep 20th 2011 DIY Compost Compost for Kids Soil 101 by Jonah Holland PR Marketing Coordinator Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden One of the great things about working at Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden is that as a staff we are always learning Our weekly staff meetings might be just as likely to include a PowerPoint presentation on LewisG Ginter the Civil War how to use Read More May 19th 2011 Sabot at Stony Point School The Birds Nests the Meadowmorphosis by Jonah Holland PR Marketing Coordinator Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden Note Over the next few weeks we will bring you updates on the progress of the Patrick Dougherty stick sculpture installation at Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden We are calling this 3 week transformation of the Anderson Meadow a Meadowmorphosis We will celebrate the completion of the Read More Apr 29th 2011 Encouraging Kids to Weave Sculpt Be Inspired in the Lewis Ginter Children s Garden by Jonah Holland PR Marketing Coordinator Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden The past few times I ve come to the Garden with my family my children have been scurrying off in a corner somewhere under the decking for the Children s Garden Tree House Yes they still want to climb the 100 year old mulberry tree and yes they Read More Apr 18th 2011 Go Green Tips for Children by Jonah Holland PR Marketing Coordinator Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden In honor of Earth Day on which is April 22 this year Kristin Mullen Early Childhood Program Developer from our Children s Garden pulled together a few green tips fun activities you can do with you kids that are earth friendly educational I Read More Dec 17th 2010 Kristin Mullen Thoroman Joins Staff by Jonah Holland PR Marketing Coordinator Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden We recently added a staff member to the Children s Garden her name is Kristin Mullen Update Kristin was married in 2015 and now goes by Kristin Thoroman Kristin started as Early Childhood Program Developer earlier this month after relocating to

    Original URL path: http://www.lewisginter.org/category/children/page/5/ (2016-02-13)
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  • Families & Kids
    watching We hang feeders outside of our office windows and keep them well stocked The most popular feeder is outside of the kitchen window of the Children s Garden Carriage House where we Read More Nov 16th 2009 What s Happening Now in the Children s Garden by Erin Wright Children s Garden Educator Horticulturist Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden Here is the inside scoop on what s Happening Now in the Children s Garden right now Persimmon fruit in the Children s Garden at Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden The persimmons are still on the tree here in the Children s Garden The persimmon is one of my Read More Nov 4th 2009 Come Visit our Human Sundial in the Children s Garden by Erin Wright Children s Garden Educator and Horticulturist Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden Working in the Children s Garden at Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden is always a lot of fun the staff here loves learning about nature as much as we like teaching kids about it Krissi one of the Program Developers in the Children s Garden Read More Apr 1st 2009 No Dirt Babies Left Inside by Jonah Holland PR Marketing Coordinator Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden My 8 year old daughter came home from school this week incredibly excited about a dirt baby she created After imagining her sneaking off during recess to the mud pile behind the playground and creating some kind of snowman like creature out of mud I realized she was talking Read More Nov 26th 2008 The Age old Practice of Gleaning is Finally Finding the Limelight I ve got to credit the ladies over at GardenRant for bringing this to my attention This week the New York Times wrote a short but amazing story about how a farm in Colorado opened up

    Original URL path: http://www.lewisginter.org/category/children/page/6/ (2016-02-13)
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  • Ginkgo
    to the odor of the female s rotting fruit Although the skin of the fruit can irritate human skin like a poison ivy reaction some use parts of the ginkgo for medicinal purposes The nut of the ginkgo is a delicacy in many cultures Note Eating too many ginkgo nuts can cause poisoning so you d want to check with a medical professional before ingesting any The magnificent golden foliage before the leaves fall Elizabeth Fogel Senior Horticulturist with help from others is the brave soul who picks up the fruit that falls from our female Ginkgo biloba In the fall three to four times a week Fogel devotes many hours to picking up fruit from the ground This job can be tricky because the fruit contains butyric acid which makes it smell bad You can see why cleaning the fruit up is a priority for weddings and special events Fans of the tree come from all over to see the magnificent golden leaves that have a reputation for falling all at once During our conversation I asked Fogel how she felt about the tree She mentioned if she had to post a relationship status between her and the ginkgo tree Fogel would say It s complicated The ginkgo has so many wonderful qualities like the beautiful fall colors its shape and form and the uniquely shaped leaves but then it does this horrible fruit set Ginkgo fruit collected in buckets by staff and volunteers It s a lot of work to keep up with the amount of fruit that falls from the tree Despite the Garden s effort to minimize the tree s ability to produce fruit by a spraying growth regulator in the spring 360 gallons of ripe and unripe fruit is collected each year by Fogel staff and volunteers It takes commitment and tenacity to complete such a tedious job Keeping the grounds clear of smelly fruit every week can be overwhelming and Fogel s hard work doesn t go unnoticed After a particularly fruitful day she goes back to her desk and reads a message from her friend and Children s Garden educator Dawn Lipscomb Ruler of the Ginkgo and she will not be defeated Can t get enough of our ginkgo The ginkgo tree will be up lit and incorporated into this year s Dominion GardenFest of Lights You can also read facts about the tree in the Lora Robins Library If you re in search of a unique gift this holiday season Ginkgo leaves from our trees are encased in cooper and can be purchased at the Garden Shop Staff and volunteers help pick up fruit from the Ginkgo biloba As of today there are still beautiful fall leaves on some of our ginkgo trees in the Asian Valley The leaves on this remarkable tree have mostly fallen now but if you visit it look for a special ephemeral message written on the ground in golden yellow leaves About Tonisha Albritton Tonisha Albritton is

    Original URL path: http://www.lewisginter.org/ruler-of-the-ginkgo/ (2016-02-13)
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  • Vines
    very wet or very dry locations At times an aggressive plant such as a non native vine is called for Burrell said The right vine in the right place can become voluminous in the landscape Gardeners also plant vines to soften hard surface landscape elements such as deck rails fences and light posts or to spotlight garden ornaments such as obelisks and fountains Burrell recommends planting multiple vines when possible Mixing vines can extend your enjoyment and season of interest she said referring to the blending of annuals and perennials as well as complementing varieties The upward growth of some vines has a small garden footprint but it can yield big returns Perennial vines planted at the base of vertical structures such as lattices pergolas and arbors can create living screens that flourish year to year when properly maintained As the climbing shoots mature they intertwine to provide privacy and periods of shade Vines are a fantastic plant that adds a little drama to your garden Burrell added Experiment it s the spice of gardening and just have fun Wine Cups Callirhoe involucrate is a native wildflower that decorates full sun gardens with a summer long display Photo by Beth Burrell Typically the family of vines is categorized by the means of support Tendrils are thin wiry outgrowths from the stem or leaf that whip around to find support and then coil around the closest contact Passionflowers and grapes use tendrils to climb Twiners use their leaves to wrap around and encircle strings wires or other supports provided them Honeysuckle wisteria morning glory chocolate vine and clematis are twining vines Adhesive vines stick to surfaces with their touch sensitive pads Virginia creeper and Boston ivy both rely on their adhesive capabilities to climb tree trunks and adhere to buildings Sprawlers or scramblers such as rambling roses and bougainvillea have long flexible stems that cannot easily climb Many use their thorns to grab onto structures for supported growth Clinging vines attach firmly to most anything in their path using short stout aerial rootlets Their potential to permanently damage structures by lifting shingles edging into cracks and crevices and impairing trees makes it wise to provide an arbor or trellis as a climbing alternate Examples of clinging vines are English ivy climbing hydrangea and winter creeper euonymus Bines climb by shoots that grow in a helix around a support The stems of many bines are rough or have downward pointing bristles to aid their grip Hops are the female flowers harvested from herbaceous bines of perennial hop species Humulus lupulus for brewing beer Cypress vine Ipomoea quamoclit is easily grown from seed and is a hummingbird favorite Photo credit Beth Burrell Vine growing tips Ties Take your pick of products designed to attach vines to structures zip ties soft ties garden twine baling twine or thin thread Selecting those green in color makes the ties practically disappear from view Starting seeds Cardboard egg cartons and paper toilet roll holders are ideal for

    Original URL path: http://www.lewisginter.org/vines-by-design/ (2016-02-13)
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  • spring ephemerals
    weather conditions Their seemingly untimely appearance brings hope to gardeners marking the closing days of winter and the promise of spring In addition to providing beauty and color in the late winter landscape these wildflowers also perform valuable eco system services Vehrs said As native plants they offer a sense of place Since they evolved over eons they developed important inter relationships with birds insects soil and our eco system John Magee owner of Magee Design in Middleburg is equally passionate about wildflowers and other native plants For decades he has used them almost exclusively in his naturalistic and sustainable landscape designs However it s taken a long time for his recommendations to be fully appreciated Twenty years ago when I explained benefits for using natural plants versus introduced non native plants I was considered by some as a hippie he said Now I m called a natural plant expert Magee and other eco friendly landscapers are experiencing a new wave of calls from homeowners and businesses interested in returning to yesteryear s use of wildflowers and other native plants More and more people are realizing how out of balance our world is and they re wanting ecologically sound and sustainable landscapes he said And though summer s meadow flowers can be stunning some of the most beautiful wildflowers are spring ephemerals that grow in the shade Spring ephemerals should be planted in late autumn following the first hard frost so now is the time to research plan and shop for them Editor s Note This article first published in the Richmond Times Dispatch in September 2015 Virginia bluebell Mertensia virginica brightens woodlands with hanging trumpets of vibrant color About Lynn Kirk Lynn Kirk a freelance writer and marketing consultant has collaborated with Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden since 2002 She

    Original URL path: http://www.lewisginter.org/wildflowers-heralds-of-spring/ (2016-02-13)
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  • Emmenopterys henryi
    ago Emmenopterys henryi is a tree made famous by the legendary botanist Ernest Wilson who described the tree as one of the most strikingly beautiful trees of Chinese forests The first time this species bloomed in North America was in 1994 Lucky for you this beauty blooms early every August Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden You ll notice the funnel shaped blooms have a unique form with each cluster surrounded by large white bracts and the blooms are accentuated by red petioles Emmenopterys henryi is pollinated by a wide variety of insects including beetles and butterflies and its seeds are winged to be distributed by wind Unfortunately however in China this species of tree is classified as Near Threatened NT by the China Species Red List Here you can see the full form of the Emmenopterys henryi tree and the location in the Garden on the east side of the Main Garden Walk As you can see in the photo below our tree is at the top of the Main Garden Path in the Central Garden Want to learn more about Emmenopterys henryi You can read more on Quarryhill Botanical Garden s website http bit ly Ehenryi About Jonah Holland Jonah Holland is PR Marketing Coordinator at Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden specializing in social media She s been known to go for a walk and come back completely inspired to write a blog post on her newest found adventure You May Also Like California Dreaming Volcanoes vs Doughnuts Preparing Plants for Snow Gardening Trends for 2016 Don t Miss Out Subscribe to the Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden Blog Posts by Topic Blooms Gardens Community Kitchen Garden Education Classes Events Families Kids Gardening Horticulture Gardens Through the Seasons Making a Difference in the Community More about the Garden Sustainable Practices Uncategorized Recent

    Original URL path: http://www.lewisginter.org/a-rare-tree-blooms-at-ginter/ (2016-02-13)
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  • Water Gardens
    galvanized washtubs to feed and seed stock tanks and vintage sinks If a container holds the imagination but not water Cowart suggests a simple solution add a plastic liner or apply sealant Just be certain that it s safe for plants and wildlife Creative expression continues with the display whether it s a still water garden or a bubbling fountain Multiple water pots vertically stacked in ragged progression are eye catchers as are themed gardens like fairy or tropical water gardens complemented with decorative ornaments and collectibles Containers in unexpected places such as nestled in an old tree stump entice passers by to pause reflect and enjoy They re dramatic additions indoors too as table centerpieces bathroom showpieces office decoratives and foyer accents Water features positioned on unexpected planes offer another element of interest For example a fountain laid on the ground horizontally versus vertically can be configured so water continually empties out of its mouth into an in ground reservoir for recirculation Fearington Village in Pittsboro N C uses decorative frog as fountain in water garden Photo by Grace Chapman It provides mystery about how it was made and where the water is going Cowart said Originality doesn t stop with installation finishing touches are equally important Rather than covering the base of outdoor containers with traditional mulch gravel or slate pieces a water gardener can experiment with decorative glass stones that catch the sun s rays or pieces of broken mosaic tiles that provide robust color Mounting miniature spotlights or uplights emphasizes these artistic elements and water movement while extending viewing pleasure into the evening hours Flowers with seasonal interest float in a still water garden at Chanticleer Gardens in Wayne Pa Photo by Grace Chapman Personalization continues with the plethora of aquatic plants now available at local retailers Cowart prefers lotus whose gorgeous summer blooms can be show stoppers Water lilies run the gamut of size and color while papyrus prompts conversation about its ancient origins Small fish provide motion and interest in circulating ponds but it s wise to research their needs before purchase As with soil based gardens water gardens offer their own set of challenges Evaporation increases in the heat of summer so regular additions of water may be necessary If algae levels start to rise Cowart suggests moving the container to a shadier spot if possible or adding a decorative umbrella so the sun can t nurture algae growth Another option is to cover at least two thirds of the surface with plant material or use algae control pellets that inhibit growth in an environmentally safe manner Standing water can become a breeding ground for mosquitoes so consider adding a bubbler or similar element that creates water movement Water gardens offer an educational aspect too A starter pond is a fun way for youngsters to experiment with science and explore nature especially when the water attracts birds and curious wildlife It not only fosters respect for a precious natural resource it nurtures a

    Original URL path: http://www.lewisginter.org/water-gardens/ (2016-02-13)
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  • Meet the Horticulture Staff
    Butterflies LIVE on our free admission day during CarMax Free Fourth of July you probably met her She was the one with the lemony scented arid orchid Aerides houlletiana She took it to all of our guests who were waiting in line so they could see and smell something new Then she showed them how it didn t even have any soil See what I mean Okay Chelsea take it away Chelsea Mahaffey Conservatory Horticulturist I am the advocate of all things under glass everything from tropical plants beneficial bugs and especially guest interpretation Smelling the arid orchid Notice how there is not dirt for the orchid It doesn t need it In their native environment these orchids grow in trees Smells like lemons Question What s your favorite part of the garden Answer The moment you step out of the orchid wing and overlook the entire garden It s amazing to see the transitions within the gardens but to see it as a whole is mesmerizing Question Tell us something that surprising about you that your coworkers might not know Answer My favorite genre of movie are kid s movies Any given weeknight I could be watching Ice Age or Chitty Chitty Bang Bang They are so much more creative and I like to take that creativity into my own work I ll take that over any other blockbuster any night Question Where did you work before you came to Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden Answer I ve worked at a variety of places before coming to Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden a zoo an urban farm an arboretum a retail greenhouse just to name a few Most recently I worked at Peace Tree Farm a wholesale tropical greenhouse in south east Pennsylvania My primary focus there was forcing annuals and perennials for the Philadelphia Flower Show Forcing was so much fun Who doesn t like to see Astilbe bloom in February Question What do you do in your free time Answer Recently I ve been cooking a lot mostly brunches on the weekends I ve been reading East of Eden on my sunny porch I m trying to start up our herb garden but our lawn boy keeps mowing over things when we aren t around Also I might be out in the yard playing with my dog Lady Question Where did you grow up Answer I grew up in Erie Pennsylvania I enjoyed the summers there There was always a lot to do in the summer from the Peninsula the beach or even just playing out in my mom s garden The winters were a different story there is only so much snow a person can take Question What part of Richmond do you live in Answer I live in the southern tip of Highland Park I m a sucker for Queen Anne Victorian houses It also has a fenced in yard which my dog enjoys quite a bit Question What s your favorite plant Answer I have a

    Original URL path: http://www.lewisginter.org/meet-horticulturist-chelsea-mahaffey/ (2016-02-13)
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