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  • Incredible Cauliflower - Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden
    Vick Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden Community Kitchen Garden Coordinator The cauliflower in the Lewis Ginter Community Kitchen Garden is maturing slowly but surely The cooler than normal temperatures have slowed the process but we ve already harvested 202 lbs of Snow Crown curds and 116 lbs of cauliflower leaves for delivery to FeedMore Most people have never seen a complete cauliflower plant The giant leaves are beautiful plentiful and highly nutritious FeedMore is also making use of our broccoli leaves and stems YTD Community Kitchen Garden Harvest Total 11 304 lbs These numbers were updated to reflect donations as of November 27 2012 Lewis Ginter gardener Laura Schumm wrangles a massive cauliflower A beautiful Snow Crown specimen 11 21 12 Recipes abound on the Web from roasting the leaves to soups Try olive oil onions apples with the chopped stalks and leaves in a saute pan Cook to desired tenderness Or combine both cauliflower leaves into one yummy dish About Jonah Holland Jonah Holland is PR Marketing Coordinator at Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden specializing in social media She s been known to go for a walk and come back completely inspired to write a blog post on her newest found adventure You May Also Like What s Cooking in The Community Kitchen Garden Butterfly Rockstar Mina Craft Beer Craze A Hippopotamus sized Harvest Pingback Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden Blog Archive Eat Your Greens Broccoli Leaves That is Don t Miss Out Subscribe to the Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden Blog Posts by Topic Blooms Gardens Community Kitchen Garden Education Classes Events Families Kids Gardening Horticulture Gardens Through the Seasons Making a Difference in the Community More about the Garden Sustainable Practices Uncategorized Recent Posts Winter Interest Inspiration Education Nature California Dreaming De Lighting Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden Spring like Day Blooms

    Original URL path: http://www.lewisginter.org/incredible-cauliflower/ (2016-02-13)
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  • Best Friends Forever - Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden
    and the beans help to stabilize the corn stalks The beans also fix nitrogen on their roots this helps to add nutrients back to the soil for next year The squash grows low to the ground and works like a natural mulch by retarding weed growth and preventing water evaporation from the soil These three crops not only grow together in harmony they help each other to grow better and stronger like good friends should Here in the Community Kitchen Garden we focus less on partnering vegetable types and more on partnering herbs and other scented perennials with vegetables Certain flowering plants such as tansy and salvia work great as companion plants because they attract beneficial insects like honey bees and repel pests like squash bugs cabbage moths and cucumber beetles Be careful with tansy though it is very toxic to animals and can be invasive Flowers like nasturtiums are said to attract predatory insects and repel cucumber beetles aphids and white flies Aromatic herbs such as rosemary dill and thyme work well as companion plants Dill is said to improve the growth of cabbage and be a good companion to lettuce also This herb can cross pollinate with carrots so keep those two separated Companion planting is not an exact science and the results of your companion planting efforts can be hard to measure Environmental factors can also have a huge impact on insect populations In other words if the winter is really mild like it was this past winter there is going to be a lot of insect activity no matter how many aromatic herbs you use in your garden plan Every season will be a little bit different from the last Companion planting is not a sure fire way to eliminate pest problems in your garden and

    Original URL path: http://www.lewisginter.org/best-friends-forever/ (2016-02-13)
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  • Dominion Delivers - Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden
    Ginter Botanical Garden Community Kitchen Garden Coordinator Dominion is now the 2012 corporate leader in both the total number of associates and total number of hours committed to the success of the Lewis Ginter Community Kitchen Garden Dominion achieved the leadership position as of Monday October 22 when Iva Limbach led her team to work in the Garden Iva and her team also volunteered in the garden during 2011 and other Dominion associates during 2012 were repeat volunteers as well The Dominion team in the Community Kitchen Garden 10 22 12 The Dominion team nears the end of the sweet potato harvest Dominion associate Derek Wenger tackles the tilling job preparing the sweet potato bed for a winter cover crop of red clover The Monday harvest combined with the Saturday harvest resulted in 390 pounds of sweet potatoes delivered to FeedMore Editor s Note Dominion is a wonderful partner to the Garden in many ways Dominion is also the title sponsor for Dominion GardenFest of Lights which will run November 23 2012 January 7 2013 About Jonah Holland Jonah Holland is PR Marketing Coordinator at Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden specializing in social media She s been known to go for a walk and come back completely inspired to write a blog post on her newest found adventure You May Also Like What s Cooking in The Community Kitchen Garden Butterfly Rockstar Mina Craft Beer Craze A Hippopotamus sized Harvest Don t Miss Out Subscribe to the Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden Blog Posts by Topic Blooms Gardens Community Kitchen Garden Education Classes Events Families Kids Gardening Horticulture Gardens Through the Seasons Making a Difference in the Community More about the Garden Sustainable Practices Uncategorized Recent Posts Winter Interest Inspiration Education Nature California Dreaming De Lighting Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden Spring like

    Original URL path: http://www.lewisginter.org/dominion-delivers/ (2016-02-13)
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  • Jack-o-Turnip? - Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden
    by Albert Brian Vick Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden Community Kitchen Garden Coordinator Jack o Lantern carving may date back to an old story involving a turnip Look it up Can turnips really get large enough to hold a candle Judging from a couple of freak radishes this summer it s very possible Contemporaneous carvings thanks to Emily and Cesar Maybe not quite a Jack o Turnip but a beauty nonetheless About Jonah Holland Jonah Holland is PR Marketing Coordinator at Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden specializing in social media She s been known to go for a walk and come back completely inspired to write a blog post on her newest found adventure You May Also Like What s Cooking in The Community Kitchen Garden Butterfly Rockstar Mina Craft Beer Craze A Hippopotamus sized Harvest Don t Miss Out Subscribe to the Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden Blog Posts by Topic Blooms Gardens Community Kitchen Garden Education Classes Events Families Kids Gardening Horticulture Gardens Through the Seasons Making a Difference in the Community More about the Garden Sustainable Practices Uncategorized Recent Posts Winter Interest Inspiration Education Nature California Dreaming De Lighting Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden Spring like Day Blooms Most Popular 5

    Original URL path: http://www.lewisginter.org/jack-o-turnip/ (2016-02-13)
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  • Batata Boom Boom - Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden
    activities worship social programming On Saturday the J Town team was joined by HandsOn RVA volunteer Maria Carra Rose and Lewis Ginter volunteer John Jameson These sweet potatoes are 100 percent organic two varieties O Henry Beauregard grown from slips donated by Slade Farms in Surry Va and fertilized only with fish emulsion and seaweed extract John Jameson left and Rabbi Jesse Gallop begin to pull back the dense vines The O Henrys a white gold variety were the best producers averaging 4 or 5 storage roots per plant Unlike squash you can t easily walk around and try to limit any over sized produce because of the density of the prolific vines and the fact that most of the sweet potato is below ground Part of the Beauregard harvest The Batata Boom Gang Rabbi Jesse Carra Tanisha Nerice John Adam on Saturday A note from the editor I just got news from Brian Vick Community Kitchen Garden Coordinator that Monday we delivered 390 lbs of sweet potatoes 208 lbs of the O Henry white gold variety and 182 lbs of Beauregard orange flesh potatoes This delivery represents the entire sweet potato crop Year to date produce total 10 345 lbs This is the first year we have exceeded our 10 000 pound production goal and there are still more veggies to come About Jonah Holland Jonah Holland is PR Marketing Coordinator at Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden specializing in social media She s been known to go for a walk and come back completely inspired to write a blog post on her newest found adventure You May Also Like What s Cooking in The Community Kitchen Garden Butterfly Rockstar Mina Craft Beer Craze A Hippopotamus sized Harvest http 2tonline dk Luna Wow i didn t know they could grow to

    Original URL path: http://www.lewisginter.org/batata-boom-boom/ (2016-02-13)
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  • A Not So Sweet Surprise - Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden
    pest was the white grub White grubs are the larval stage of scarab beetles and many different types of scarab beetles were spotted in the Community Kitchen Garden this season including the June beetle bess beetle and grapevine beetle The adult beetles lay their eggs in grassy areas composts piles mulch piles etc In fact we inadvertently encourage the presence of some of these beetles by our extensive use of wood chip mulch Once the grubs hatch they feed on organic matter like compost decaying wood or roots and tubers of plants These not so little grubs are known to cause major damage to turf grass The bess beetle is sometimes referred to as the patent leather beetle To our great relief the damage to our sweet potato was only cosmetic To complete our inspection Brian took the tuber home peeled it and had it for dinner He reported back that the potato was very tasty and had great texture Since our sweet potatoes will be donated and most likely peeled once they make it to the Community Kitchen the damage to the outside won t really matter too much This cosmetic damage could be devastating though if we were growing these potatoes to sell at market Farmers in the south have lost fields of sweet potatoes to white grubs because the damage they cause renders the tubers unmarketable even though the damage is only skin deep The grapevine beetle Many consider white grubs to be harmless or even beneficial when it comes to composting but I think a sweet potato farmer would argue that point If you are looking to control the white grub population in your garden there are two biological control products to consider Milky spore disease a naturally occurring soil bacterium is one product available and is known to be an effective treatment in the Mid Atlantic region Milky Spore is not harmful to beneficial insects birds bees pets or man However the product only works on Japanese beetle grubs so in this case it is important to identify which grub you are actually dealing with Another biological control option is parasitic nematodes which are usually shipped fresh and need to be used right away If you wish to treat white grubs in your lawn there are many non organic preventative and curative treatments as well Insect parasitic nematodes or microscopic worms that attack insects are another biological control option that can be used to treat white grubs in your lawn or garden These nematodes are not to be confused with plant parasitic nematodes that attack plants These nematodes enter the insect host and transmit a bacterium that is only toxic to insects it has no effect on birds and other mammals Insect parasitic nematodes are naturally occurring in the soil but can also be purchased Steinernema carpocapsae and Heterorhabditis bacteriophora are two species of insect parasitic nematodes that can be purchased There is also a new strain of Bt Bacillus thuringiensis called Bt Serovor japonensis

    Original URL path: http://www.lewisginter.org/a-not-so-sweet-surprise/ (2016-02-13)
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  • Ta Ta & Toodle-oo Tomatoes - Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden
    Vick Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden Community Kitchen Garden Coordinator There s something incongruous about a chilly 50 degree gray wet day and the warm color of ripening tomatoes on the vines The stark contrast reinforces the realities of our seasonal transition We re about to say farewell to our last tomatoes in the Lewis Ginter Community Kitchen Garde n After all it is nearly mid October At one point this summer we had over 600 vines in the garden including several varieties of heirlooms and hybrids Now we re down to only 10 vines hybrid beefsteak variety planted relatively late We remove the majority of our vines a wee bit early in the fall for two reasons 1 we need some of the space for cole crops and 2 we want to ensure good germination of our winter cover crops before the soil starts to freeze 2012 Year to Date Tomato Yield Delivered to FeedMore 5 288 lbs Lewis Ginter intern Laura Schumm prepares to pick some of the last 2012 tomatoes for delivery to FeedMore About Jonah Holland Jonah Holland is PR Marketing Coordinator at Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden specializing in social media She s been known to go for a walk and come back completely inspired to write a blog post on her newest found adventure You May Also Like What s Cooking in The Community Kitchen Garden Butterfly Rockstar Mina Craft Beer Craze A Hippopotamus sized Harvest Don t Miss Out Subscribe to the Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden Blog Posts by Topic Blooms Gardens Community Kitchen Garden Education Classes Events Families Kids Gardening Horticulture Gardens Through the Seasons Making a Difference in the Community More about the Garden Sustainable Practices Uncategorized Recent Posts Winter Interest Inspiration Education Nature California Dreaming De Lighting Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden Spring

    Original URL path: http://www.lewisginter.org/ta-ta-toodle-oo-tomatoes/ (2016-02-13)
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  • Friend or Foe? - Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden
    Garden has many books dedicated to the topic of garden pests The Virginia Cooperative Extension Agency is also a wonderful resource and don t forget about your fellow gardeners and local farmers Be careful when using the Internet for bug identification If you do stick with one of many universities have entomology departments with great websites that are very reliable Here in the CKG the vine borers cucumber beetles and squash bugs have been around for months now but we recently had many other insects invade the garden Over the last few weeks we have identified many other pests like aphids leaf footed bugs Mexican bean beetles tomato hornworms harlequin bugs cross striped cabbage worms cabbage loopers and imported cabbage worms The presence of these pests has attracted beneficials like ladybugs lace wings soldier beetles and predatory wasps The beneficial insects prey on or parasitize the pest insects For example ladybugs love to feast on aphids and small parasitic wasps lay their eggs on the backs of tomato hornworms The wasp lays its eggs on the hornworm as the eggs hatch the wasp larvae eat the hornworm killing it in the process This photo shows parasitic wasp cocoons on a hornworm if you see this in your garden leave it be so that the wasps hatch and the process can begin again Once you have positively identified the insects in your garden you can choose the most effective and least hazardous treatment In the CKG we use Bacillus thuringiensis Bt which is a naturally occurring bacteria that is used as an organic pesticide and it does not kill beneficial insects We also use aromatic herbs such as basil and dill as companion plants to try to deter insect pests in the first place Avoid broad spectrum pesticides that kill all

    Original URL path: http://www.lewisginter.org/friend-or-foe/ (2016-02-13)
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