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  • Masters Class: Pen & Ink with Alice Tangerini - Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden
    teachers to be inspirational and motivating The Garden from time to time offers master classes taught by an acknowledged national expert This past weekend I was honored to take a Pen and Ink Workshop masters class with Alice Tangerini Alice is a staff illustrator at the Department of Botany at the Smithsonian Institution and a VCU graduate Botanical Illustrations of the Burr oak Despite having taken a scientific illustration course before I was feeling a little intimidated by the class However Alice put us at ease She is an excellent teacher and worked with us through the process of creating a pen and ink plate used in publication of our specimen the bur oak Quercus macrocarpa This oak has unusual stems and the acorn caps are sort of well hairy A student working in class Alice often works from pressed plants called herbarium specimens which are flattened and dried so our first step was to photocopy the leaves and branch Then Alice worked with us as we traced the various parts of the plant some tracings done under a microscope were provided for us cutting and taping them on Bristol board as we created a pleasing composition that included all the required parts Alice helped us to draw the plant with accuracy and showed us the conventions and methods used in scientific illustration She gave many demonstrations so we could all see how the work was done The three day class was challenging but we were all able to make good progress toward finishing our compositions There was no need to feel intimidated after all Students in Alice Tangerini s class in front of the Conservatory About Jonah Holland Jonah Holland is PR Marketing Coordinator at Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden specializing in social media She s been known to go

    Original URL path: http://www.lewisginter.org/masters-class-pen-ink-with-alice-tangerini/ (2016-02-13)
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  • Native Plants are Nature’s Intended - Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden
    being happy and healthy but we re not going to have them without native plants at the base of the food chain Hayden said that native plants insects and animals co evolved over time so certain essential interrelationships developed When native flora is not available or is negatively impacted ramifications occur across the entire food chain Another benefit of using native plants is the need for less Native plants require less work less money less chemicals and less water to maintain than non natives because they ve adapted to the region s soil and climate There s minimal or no need to change local conditions to meet their needs The growing plea from native plant societies water quality organizations researchers and biologists is to opt for native species whenever feasible but along with that philosophy comes the need for changed expectations Native perennials shrubs and trees aren t as predictable in size and shape as genetically altered hybrids They also may not be the newest largest or most unusual specimens like some of the genetically enhanced hybrids However native plants naturally showcase the region s native flora and more importantly earn the approval of native insects songbirds and wildlife that make it their home If you want to grow native plants it s best to purchase them from retailers and nurseries that specialize in native varieties Those growing naturally in woodlands and meadows don t respond well to transplanting Native plants may be seen and enjoyed along the Garden s Wildside Walk and Butterfly Meadow as well as areas of the Children s Garden For tips on nurturing them once planted explore resources in the Lora M Robins Library at Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden or these books from the Garden Shop Native Alternatives to Invasive Plants Bringing Nature Home and

    Original URL path: http://www.lewisginter.org/native-plants-are-natures-intended/ (2016-02-13)
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  • Blue Sky Partners with Ginter to Make Hands-On Science Education Fun - Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden
    took the tree leaf branch cuttings and would start at numbered stations answering a series of two option questions hence the term dichotomous in order to identify the tree Each station once answered would send the students to a new numbered station until they had correctly identified their tree After we realized the students were quickly catching on to how to do the activity we made it more challenging by having them scatter the numbers of the stations in random order and then racing another team to see who could identify a new leaf first Take a minute to look through the photos you ll see some great learning going on This program was made possible thanks to a grant from The Dominion Foundation Tasting a snacking pepper 5th Grade girls mulching in the Children s Garden This was the service part of the project Using the dichotomous key to determine what tree their branch came from Bellevue teacher Ms May helping the students with the dichotomous key The kids worked in teams to measure the soil temperature at various intervals under and outside of the tree canopy Here the students are learning scientific method one of the 5th grade SOLs Students used the scientific method to determine the effect of trees on soil temperature Since this was the students second trip out to the Garden this year they worked on evaluating their hypotheses from September They measured the soil temperature at three different points from the tree 2 ft usually around 10 feet and 20 feet and in up to four different directions north south east west 2 ft is in the mulch dirt base around the tree 10 12 ft is usually under the tree canopy and the final measurement is outside the canopy Exploring with a magnifying

    Original URL path: http://www.lewisginter.org/blue-sky/ (2016-02-13)
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  • Making Beauty Sustainable: Landscape Design That's Pleasing & Functional - Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden
    buy a house but buy a house with a yard big enough to have my own garden Some people may have things like bungee jumping or jumping out of an airplane on their bucket list but I prefer to keep my feet on the ground and I d like to use my own hands to dig up the earth and cover that ground with beautiful plants and vegetables Higgins has inspired within me a passion to one day achieve this goal and made me realize just how important it is Rainer brought up several wonderful points about the different layers of landscapes and how to vertically layer plants to make the most of every nook and cranny available He broke these layers down into three sections the upper layer the leafless upper layer plants inhabiting different areas sparsely throughout the middle layer the bulk of the design this is what your eyes really focus on where usually one to two species are especially dominant and last the ground cover layer the area most people forget about the various grasses and species that are low to the ground Rainer noted that we have moved to a landscape design of heavily mulched areas with a few plants sprinkled here and there in between By utilizing the ground cover layer instead of spreading mulch far and wide we can use a variety of grasses and low lying shrubs to create green mulch In nature we do not find mulch or bare ground as we do in a man made landscape design but we do find green mulch or plants and grasses that grow covering the ground layer I highly recommend taking a look around Rainer s blog even I a gardening novice even that term seems too generous enjoyed reading up on Rainer s views on landscape design I took a lot of notes during both Higgins and Rainer s presentations and I hope that one day I can put them to good use in a garden of my own For now I will share them with you in hopes that you can put them to good use in your yard Rainer believes we should reevaluate how we think about native and ecological planting Native gardens are a big trend now but the message of native planting is being interpreted too strictly One doesn t have to get rid of their exotic non native plants but one should take on the design challenge of integrating native plant species with other species Some tips for achieving this harmony Observe how a plant works in nature and how plants naturally interact with other species Design your garden based off these interpretations Consider three principles for design plant to place create a palette from similar habitats plant to plant vertically layer compatible species and plant to people how plants will interact with you the emotional connection Consider that plants and landscapes in nature thrive without interference plant plants where they might grow naturally they might live

    Original URL path: http://www.lewisginter.org/making-beauty-sustainable-landscape-design-thats-pleasing-functional/ (2016-02-13)
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  • The Significant Contributions of Bees - Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden
    bio indicator of the state of our ecosystem The average rate of hive loss over the past several years in the United States and in Virginia is around 35 percent Basically over a third of our bees die each year by any comparison that is unsustainable as a business model for any farmer Also suffering are produce farmers requiring the services of beekeepers to pollinate their crops For the past 10 years area farmers have found it difficult to hire enough hives to effectively pollinate their crops When Colony Collapse Disorder CCD escalated about 10 years ago compounded by financial losses due to hive deaths and an aging beekeeper population over a third of Virginia s beekeepers left the industry Fewer bees lower produce yields higher prices for produce and milk dairy cows eat alfalfa pollinated by bees For people already experiencing food insecurity our poorest Virginians this will mean even less access to healthy diverse diets of fresh produce A honey bee on Rosa Topalina in the Rose Garden at Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden So think of honey bees as canaries in the coalmine Our bees are telling us something by their disappearance no one can point a finger at any single factor Mites a fungus a new disease pesticides GMO crops are all suspect We know that one colony of bees covers an area of about 12 000 acres bees are touching just about every flower in that area and what they are picking up in the pollen the nectar and residues on the plants they visit they bring home to the hive secrete into their wax raise their young surrounded by wax cells containing micro particles of a myriad of chemicals pesticides herbicides air pollutants etc and about 3 generations later in bee time one summer the bees start to suffer the effects of bio accumulation and they succumb to mites and fungi and diseases that as healthy bees they should be able to overcome But there s hope We have some suggestions and The North American Pollinator Protection Campaign NAPPC does too The problem is multipronged overuse of chemicals in our landscapes and fields sprayed insecticides plant grown from seeds treated with insecticides herbicides etc and simply not enough flowers for the bees are some of the problems Plants along the roadside are sprayed and mowed weeds are expunged from yards weeds and wildflowers are now rounded up around fields crops are often designed to be Roundup Ready and sometimes even flowers are toxic if their seeds were treated with insecticides that permeate the entire plant s system So the solution is multi pronged too Local bee clubs are part of the solution each year classes are offered to train new beekeepers Keeping a hive or two of bees opens your eyes to a world of occurrences previously unnoticed you ll notice the array of native bees take notice of what is blooming and when observe the varieties of pollen colors that bees are gathering this

    Original URL path: http://www.lewisginter.org/the-significant-contributions-of-bees/ (2016-02-13)
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  • Living History: Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden’s Ginkgos - Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden
    cultivated stands of ginkgo trees as far back as 1 000 years ago for food and medicine The first ginkgos in the United States were planted in Philadelphia in 1784 In your neighborhood you may have seen or smelled the fruit of the ginkgo tree on the sidewalk this fall They are pink and fleshy and contain butyric acid the same acid found in vomit and cheese The seeds inside are edible Ginkgos are hardy trees and are resistant to damage from pollution fungi and pests which is why they are a popular tree in urban landscapes They are so persistent that several ginkgo trees survived the atomic bombing of Hiroshima in 1945 In the next few weeks the leaves of the female Ginkgo turn a deep yellow Within a few weeks after several frosts they fall from the tree to form a carpet of gold It s a wonderful thing to see and a great reason to visit the Garden in fall The gingko tree at historic Bloemendaal House Just think of all this tree has seen in its years here from Bloemendaal farm to the Botanical Garden today After you witness the golden canopy in the Grace Arents garden visit the exhibit Every Tree Tells a Story to see not smell Robert Llewellyn s photograph of a female ginkgo branch and experience this amazing tree anew The exhibit has been generously brought to the Garden by supporting sponsor The Davey Tree Expert Company Robert Llewellyn s Gingko print on display at Ginter Gallery II in the Kelly Education Center Gingko fossil image credit Wikimedia commons http commons wikimedia org wiki File 3AGinkgo biloba leaf 01 jpg About Jonah Holland Jonah Holland is PR Marketing Coordinator at Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden specializing in social media She s been known

    Original URL path: http://www.lewisginter.org/living-history-lewis-ginter-botanical-gardens-ginkgos/ (2016-02-13)
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  • Brains? No just Bryozoans! - Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden
    Museum Scientist at the Science Museum of Virginia confirmed that we were right The biology department of the University of Massachusetts has more great info on bryozoans Pectinatella magnifica is a member of the animal phylum Ectoprocta common names bryozoans moss animals a group with a fossil record extending back to the upper Cambrian 500 000 000 years ago The colony is gelatinous firm and slimy to the touch The inner gelatinous mass is 99 water The surface appears divided into rosettes each with 12 18 zooids Massive colonies may exceed 2 feet 60 cm in diameter although more typical sizes are 1 foot or less The colonies form on submerged logs twigs even wooden docks The Virginia Institute of Marine Science helped identify a similar Alien pod a few years ago in a lake near Newport News VA Marine bryozoans are filter feeders meaning that they help clean the water they are in The ones here at Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden are attached to old tubing that belonged to an aeration system for the water VIMS professor Carl Hershner notes that bryozoans consume algae so the alien pod is actually a good thing to have around despite its looks It s not a sign of bad water quality he adds and it doesn t hurt fish About Jonah Holland Jonah Holland is PR Marketing Coordinator at Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden specializing in social media She s been known to go for a walk and come back completely inspired to write a blog post on her newest found adventure You May Also Like Winter Interest Inspiration Education Nature Student Teacher Art Show H2Whoa Fish Facts Don t Miss Out Subscribe to the Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden Blog Posts by Topic Blooms Gardens Community Kitchen Garden Education Classes Events Families Kids

    Original URL path: http://www.lewisginter.org/brains-no-just-bryozoans/ (2016-02-13)
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  • Our Butterflies Arrived Safely in Tucson! - Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden
    Tucson by Jonah Holland by Jonah Holland PR Marketing Coordinator Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden Last week we told you about our butterfly round up At the close of Butterflies LIVE we sent 194 butterflies from the exhibit to Tucson Botanical Gardens Tucson just sent this note with these pictures There were three families in the exhibit when the package arrived so those children and moms were able to participate by holding some of the butterflies until the butterflies flew off Usually we have a no touch policy but in this case we made an exception and it was a hit with the families Thank you very much for all the butterflies The box of butterflies arrived safely at the Cox Butterfly and Orchid Pavilion Tucson Botanical Garden Families had fun helping the Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden butterflies get settled in their new home Waiting for the butterfly to be ready to fly after waking up from the trip Butterfly charmer Holding a butterfly waiting for it to be ready to fly About Jonah Holland Jonah Holland is PR Marketing Coordinator at Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden specializing in social media She s been known to go for a walk and come back completely inspired to write a blog post on her newest found adventure You May Also Like Winter Interest Inspiration Education Nature De Lighting Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden Student Teacher Art Show Don t Miss Out Subscribe to the Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden Blog Posts by Topic Blooms Gardens Community Kitchen Garden Education Classes Events Families Kids Gardening Horticulture Gardens Through the Seasons Making a Difference in the Community More about the Garden Sustainable Practices Uncategorized Recent Posts Winter Interest Inspiration Education Nature California Dreaming De Lighting Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden Spring like Day Blooms Most Popular 5 Tips Visiting

    Original URL path: http://www.lewisginter.org/our-butterflies-arrived-safely-in-tucson/ (2016-02-13)
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