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  • Hatching Bluebirds at Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden - Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden
    cavity nesters and can be easily turned away from a potential nest site Our chickadees seem to start nesting early before the temperature gets warm enough for the bluebirds so they seem to be the ones that occupy most of our boxes in early spring House sparrows are a different matter altogether They are the bullies of our cavity nesters Aside from making nests with trash twigs straw or anything they can find they also have no respect for nests occupied by other species Unfortunately they will sometimes kill other nestlings crush eggs and even build nests on top of another active nest So our goal is to check the boxes often and remove house sparrow nests before they get established The Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries gives some tips on how to attract bluebirds and discourage house sparrows from nesting in bluebird boxes Do NOT allow HOUSE SPARROWS to use the box The house sparrow weaver finch is a non native aggressive species that will drive bluebirds away House sparrows are known to kill parent birds on the nest as well as their young if given an opportunity Since house sparrows tend to prefer nesting near buildings you can deter them in part by locating the bluebird box away from buildings and out in an open field instead Also you can try removing the sparrow s nesting material as it tries to build a nest Since the house sparrow is legally defined in Virginia as a nuisance species it is legal to remove and or destroy house sparrow nests and eggs Although fairly persistent the house sparrow may give up and move on As the Department of Game and Inland Fisheries mentions house sparrows are not native to North America sort of like the bird version of

    Original URL path: http://www.lewisginter.org/hatching-bluebirds-at-lewis-ginter-botanical-garden/ (2016-02-13)
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  • DIY Pallet Garden - Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden
    sod jobs that I have done You can probably find one at any big box store or nursery I am not sure exactly what they do with them when they are unloaded and stacked up but I would be certain that they just dispose of them in some way They may even have to pay for the disposal so they may be happy for you to take a few The better condition the pallet is in the better of you will be Another progress shot As we packed the plants in we also packed potting soil all around I think this is the critical step If there are gaps and voids all around the plant s root balls then they will not be able to put roots out and more importantly will dry out very quick So make sure the pockets are pretty stuffed with soil The second step would be to buy some plants I was advised that the bigger the plant is the better off the garden will be So I had 4 pots in mind I used primarily annual plants for this one but next one I may use more perennials Succulents would probably work quite well In fact that is the next project in the works So I went to the nursery and picked out a bunch of plants that looked good together I ended up with a selection of coleus begonias a few hostas and other annuals that would do well in the shade that this pallet would be in Now it is time for the hardware of the project First you will need a roll of landscape fabric to hold the soil in place Also known as weed barrier this fabric will hold the soil while allowing water to drain through You will also need a staple gun and many many staples I used 3 8 staples that seemed to work The bigger the better in my opinion Just do not go shorter than 3 8 or you risk them pulling out We then began assembly We used many staples to hold the fabric to the wood It was a little tricky but my wonderful client did a tremendous job of getting the pockets sealed so no soil leaked out We actually got it right I think long term results will be the subject of a later post the first time Here is the final product This pallet and another one to be made will be the final touch to this yard project This yard was in fairly rough shape when I first saw it sorry LK Nothing but weeds throughout I added a gravel patio raised vegetable beds and pollinator friendly perennials throughout The pallets will hang on either side of the window on the blank white walls This will be the final touch to a wonderful transformation I was pretty surprised with how easy this actually was to make In the future the plants should all fill in and really look like

    Original URL path: http://www.lewisginter.org/diy-pallet-gardens/ (2016-02-13)
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  • Gardening: Hybrid Technology Leads to New Sunflower Varieties - Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden
    the seeds The native plant is an annual but some of today s domesticated plants are perennials that self seed and return year after year Perhaps one of the most notable changes is the sunflower s new range of colors While sunflower fans are used to golden yellow hues hybridizers also have introduced ornamental varieties with ruby red bronze and white flower heads Along with its appearance the sunflower s uses have expanded Native Americans harvested the plant for practical purposes such as food dyes and medicinal ointments In more recent times the sunflower has become a fashionable icon for home décor and jewelry The sunflower also has commercial uses Its leaves can be used for cattle feed its fibrous stems for paper production and its oil for livestock feed Because sunflower oil is often cheaper than olive oil it also is used in the production of cooking oil margarine and some alternate fuels A sunflower just starting to bloom along the Main Garden Path What hasn t changed The sunflower s love for the sun and our love for its summer beauty Tips for growing sunflowers Seed one crop then two weeks later seed another close by Plants will mature at different times extending your garden s overall bloom period Plant sunflowers to attract pollinators to your garden Watch out for imposters unless you like them as well The false sunflower Heliopsis helianthoides and the Mexican sunflower Tithonia rotundifolia are from different plant species Daisies and asters are excellent complements to the sunflower garden Sunflower varieties with small multi blooms can be deadheaded spent blooms removed to encourage more blooms Conversely tall varieties are typically single bloomers so either harvest their seeds or leave the flower heads in the garden for wildlife In some areas of the U S

    Original URL path: http://www.lewisginter.org/gardening-hybrid-technology-leads-to-new-sunflower-varieties/ (2016-02-13)
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  • Keeping Track of the Old Tracks - Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden
    with a previous blog post on the Garden s history that mentioned the trolley station Tom Riddle Jr a train enthusiast and volunteer here at the Garden met me and told me about this trolley that many Richmond natives may not know about Riddle explained that the first successful electric streetcar line in America was started right here in Richmond Now I ll be honest I am no history fanatic but that is pretty darn cool While the actual waiting station no longer stands you can see the original concrete steps that passengers walked up to get to Lakeside Park currently the Jefferson Lakeside Country Club just across Lakeside Lake If you take the path just past Bloomendaal House and look across Lakeside Lake there they are What a convenient location right This stop allowed Richmonders access to the Lakeside Wheel Club established in 1884 as well as the newly developed Lakeside Terrace suburbs Lakeside Park notice the concrete steps This station itself wasn t a turnaround though It was actually a dead end causing the streetcar operator to simply lower one of the trolley poles and raise another for the return trip With horse and carriage as the only means of major transportation the 5 cent trolley made more of Richmond accessible It s hard to remember a time when things were so simple now that we have highways and interstates How incredible that while visiting the Garden a place so rich in history and education you can take a glimpse into the past at another piece of the history that makes Richmond so momentous About Hannah Lindquist You May Also Like Winter Interest Inspiration Education Nature Student Teacher Art Show H2Whoa Fish Facts Janet Woody Jonah can the date be changed to 1895 for the Wheel Club in

    Original URL path: http://www.lewisginter.org/keeping-track-of-the-old-tracks/ (2016-02-13)
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  • Celebrate National Pollinator Week at Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden - Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden
    News Employment Contact Us Jun 16th 2014 Celebrate National Pollinator Week at Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden by Jonah Holland by Jonah Holland PR and Marketing Coordinator Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden We re joining The Pollinator Partnership to celebrate National Pollinator Week June 16 23 2014 Did you know that one of every three bites of food we eat is the direct result of pollination This week in the Children s Garden do the bee dance or enjoy a Who s Pollinating the Garden activity to learn about pollinators how to protect and sustain them and why they re important Plus join us daily from 2 4 p m Watch busy worker bees in an observation hive and taste honey from the comb age 1 and older only Honey from Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden is available for purchase in Garden Shop limited supply Pictured White peacock butterfly Anartia jatrophae with Jatropha integerima Pink Princess Photo by Don Williamson Photography About Jonah Holland Jonah Holland is PR Marketing Coordinator at Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden specializing in social media She s been known to go for a walk and come back completely inspired to write a blog post on her newest found adventure You May Also Like Winter Interest Inspiration Education Nature Student Teacher Art Show Through the Eyes of a Child Don t Miss Out Subscribe to the Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden Blog Posts by Topic Blooms Gardens Community Kitchen Garden Education Classes Events Families Kids Gardening Horticulture Gardens Through the Seasons Making a Difference in the Community More about the Garden Sustainable Practices Uncategorized Recent Posts Winter Interest Inspiration Education Nature California Dreaming De Lighting Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden Spring like Day Blooms Most Popular 5 Tips Visiting Busy GardenFest Garden s E news Sign Up Mulch Mulching in Winter Feed

    Original URL path: http://www.lewisginter.org/celebrate-national-pollinator-week-at-lewis-ginter-botanical-garden/ (2016-02-13)
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  • Love Hydrangeas? Don't miss this Walk & Talk - Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden
    habit soil type sun exposure pruning and other cultural requirements I know what you are saying You don t wan t to forget any of this great info but you also don t want to have to bring your notebook and take notes on this awesome tour Don t worry we ve got you covered Rich Waiton provided us with a cheat sheet of the major hydrangea types that you can take with you to help you remember what you learn and keep it all straight He ll give out a copy of this info to folks who sign up for the tour too Japanese Shrub Type Macrophylla large leaf and Serrata toothed leaf Familiar mophead Hortensia varieties e g Nikko Blue Variation Lacecap forms e g Blue Wave Sterile vs fertile flowers Bloom color sensitive to soil pH blue range generally requires pH of 5 5 or lower With few exceptions blooms on old wood Remontant types include All Summer Beauty Endless Summer Blushing Bride Rule of thumb Treat them like azaleas North American Type Quercifolia oakleaf hydrangea Native to Alabama and southeastern United States Relatively tolerant of drought and shade combination Snow Queen and Snowflake are standout varieties Maroon fall foliage is added bonus Blooms on old wood Give adequate space and basically ignore them A pink cultivar of hydrangea Invincibelle Spirit North American Type Arborescens smooth hydrangea Native to southeast and parts of Midwestern United States Annabelle variety best known others are Incrediball and Invincibelle Spirit Blooms on new wood treat them like Butterfly Bushes or chrysanthemums Hydrangea Invincibell Spirit Upright Shrub Type Paniculata panicle or PeeGee hydrangea Native to China Typically large loose trusses of white or cream colored blooms Combine sterile and fertile florets in varying ratios depending on cultivar Examples Grandiflora Limelight White Lace Pink Diamond Most tolerant of hot sunny exposures and hardy to Zone 3 Blooms on new wood Deciduous Vine Petiolaris Native to Japan Climbs walls and trees using aerial rootlets similar to English Ivy and difficult to distinguish from it when it is in leaf There is an attractive imposter False Hydrangea Vine Schizophragma hydrangeoides Hydrangea Endless Summer this relatively new type of hydrangea blooms on both new and old wood so you don t have to be as careful when pruning How to keep them all straight Blooms on new or old wood Sensitivity to soil pH American native or Asian Tolerance for sun and heat Interesting back story on Annabelle it is native to U S south central states including southern Appalachians and into southern Illinois says Rich Waiton Years ago an astute observer noticed a specimen in the wild that was much more showy than the average for the species growing near the town of Anna Illinois He named it Annabelle and the rest as they say is history In fact the second Saturday each June is called Annabelle Day that s tomorrow In Anna Ill on Annabelle Day citizens celebrate the Hydrangea arborescens Annabelle where over

    Original URL path: http://www.lewisginter.org/love-hydrangeas-dont-miss-this-walk-talk/ (2016-02-13)
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  • Pitcher Plants in the West Island Garden are Thriving - Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden
    to draw near While exploring its sweet slippery mouth the inquisitive typically becomes captive plummeting through a long narrowing tube toward death Downward pointing hairs prevent escape and force the prey into a deep pit of fluid where it drowns Sounds supernatural doesn t it You may remember this is what we wrote about our Sarracenia or pitcher plant collection last summer Two years ago we restored the Martha and Reed West Island Garden in an effort to adjust the water level in this garden and restore the ecosystem for these amazing specimens And this year the pitcher plant collection is looking better than ever The hardy native orchid known as swamp pink pale grasspink Calopogon pallidus loves the changes that we made there too These beauties will be blooming for the next few weeks and you can enjoy the Sarrencia all summer long but if you can t make it in person please enjoy these photos They were inspired by a Garden visitor who mentioned she d really like to see the underside of the Sarracenia bloom up close Happy to oblige Back of a pitcher plant bloom Sarracenia leucophylla Sarracenia flava bloom with spider web Wild color combo of red green pitcher plants and Calopogon pallidus Look closely Soon that insect may be dinner for this pitcher plant Does it look like an alien invasion The beautiful hardy orchid known as swamp pink pale grass pink or Calopogon pallidus About Jonah Holland Jonah Holland is PR Marketing Coordinator at Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden specializing in social media She s been known to go for a walk and come back completely inspired to write a blog post on her newest found adventure You May Also Like Winter Interest Inspiration Education Nature California Dreaming Student Teacher Art Show Don t

    Original URL path: http://www.lewisginter.org/pitcher-plants-in-the-west-island-garden-thriving/ (2016-02-13)
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  • Happy Butterfly Education Awareness Day - Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden
    Jonah Holland PR and Marketing Coordinator Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden A Julia butterfly Photo by Don Williamson Photography Did you know that Butterfly Education Awareness Day is today June 7 2014 We re celebrating by sharing some butterfly fast facts with you Did you know that Butterflies breathe through pores on their sides Their wings color patterns result from tiny modified hairs scales Butterflies tend to be most active on clear sunny days Some overwinter in native habitats while others migrate Large compound eyes provide a 360 view They have no mouth parts they use a straw like proboscis to sip nectar Insects birds rodents etc are natural enemies They smell with their antennas and taste with their feet Butterflies extract water and minerals from damp soil Some tropical butterflies prefer the juice of rotting fruit to flower nectar Some bask in the sun to reach an 85 temperature for flight Man is their greatest enemy through herbicides pesticides and habitat destruction Visit Butterflies LIVE to learn more about both native and tropical butterflies About Jonah Holland Jonah Holland is PR Marketing Coordinator at Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden specializing in social media She s been known to go for a walk and come back completely inspired to write a blog post on her newest found adventure You May Also Like Winter Interest Inspiration Education Nature Student Teacher Art Show Through the Eyes of a Child Don t Miss Out Subscribe to the Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden Blog Posts by Topic Blooms Gardens Community Kitchen Garden Education Classes Events Families Kids Gardening Horticulture Gardens Through the Seasons Making a Difference in the Community More about the Garden Sustainable Practices Uncategorized Recent Posts Winter Interest Inspiration Education Nature California Dreaming De Lighting Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden Spring like Day Blooms Most Popular

    Original URL path: http://www.lewisginter.org/happy-butterfly-education-awareness-day/ (2016-02-13)
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