archive-org.com » ORG » L » LEWISGINTER.ORG

Total: 756

Choose link from "Titles, links and description words view":

Or switch to "Titles and links view".
  • Sunny or Cloudy... Either Way, Butterflies Delight! - Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden
    About Mission Goals Leadership History News Employment Contact Us Sep 23rd 2013 Sunny or Cloudy Either Way Butterflies Delight by Jonah Holland by Jane Cramer Assistant Butterfly Curator Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden New Guinea Birdwing Ornithoptera priamus photo by Brad Alston Visiting Butterflies LIVE is a delightful experience whether you visit on a sunny or cloudy day Each kind of day has its advantages SUNNY CLOUDY Butterflies are most active with Butterflies rest more with a few many species flying species flying Opportunity to feel the uplifting Opportunity to take close up energy from the butterflies photos of many species More likely a butterfly may land on you Less likely a butterfly may land on you We release new butterflies at 10 a m daily and Saturdays at 10 a m 2 p m through October 13 Don t miss this magical experience of seeing many beautiful and colorful butterflies all around you About Jonah Holland Jonah Holland is PR Marketing Coordinator at Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden specializing in social media She s been known to go for a walk and come back completely inspired to write a blog post on her newest found adventure You May Also Like Winter Interest Inspiration Education Nature De Lighting Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden Student Teacher Art Show Don t Miss Out Subscribe to the Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden Blog Posts by Topic Blooms Gardens Community Kitchen Garden Education Classes Events Families Kids Gardening Horticulture Gardens Through the Seasons Making a Difference in the Community More about the Garden Sustainable Practices Uncategorized Recent Posts Winter Interest Inspiration Education Nature California Dreaming De Lighting Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden Spring like Day Blooms Most Popular 5 Tips Visiting Busy GardenFest Garden s E news Sign Up Mulch Mulching in Winter Feed me Seymour the Garden s

    Original URL path: http://www.lewisginter.org/sunny-or-cloudy-either-way-butterflies-delight/ (2016-02-13)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Cattails: Friend or Foe? - Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden
    and eye catching but not so invasive he said Cattails also known as bulrushes prefer wetland areas Photo by Don Wiliamson Any aquatic plants that you put in your pond are the same as terrestrial plants they need care Bonwell cautioned Cattails get a bad name when owners don t think they have to do maintenance The spread of cattails may be initially welcomed around a farm pond or area needing erosion control Otherwise a pro active response may be required to control cattail overgrowth that can reduce plant bio diversity impede water flow and block desirable wetland views Cattail populations may require pruning one or two times each year depending on the variety pond health and available nutrients The perennial s dense underground root system of rhizomes can be cut before propagating more plants In addition the brown spike flower head can be removed before it dries into a fluffy spear and bursts open releasing seed filled fruits The time period for removal is around mid summer dependent on the variety Bonwell recommends snipping the spear and placing them in a plastic bag to contain the easily dispersed fruits since cattails can produce 100 000 or more miniscule seeds per plant Much of nature seems to appreciate the cattails that remain They provide food for Canada geese and semi aquatic rodents shelter for fish frogs and snakes nesting sites for ducks and Canada geese and nesting material for birds insects and amphibians Other animals such as deer turkey and raccoons rely on tall cattail groupings for hiding places from predators Native Americans and early settlers valued cattails too They utilized various parts for food and the long sword shaped leaves for weaving baskets and mats The fluffy down like fiber in the mature spikes served as a filling for

    Original URL path: http://www.lewisginter.org/cattails-friend-or-foe/ (2016-02-13)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Cultivars & Nativars, Oh My! - Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden
    occurring in Virginia at the time of European contact Everything above still applies but this is just a marketer s fancy way of indicating that the parents were native rather than non native We ll be featuring several of these Nativars at our plant sale Including the two shown A nativar is either an open pollinated or hybridized selection from native plant parents Nativars might have been selected because of a new leaf or flower color a superior growth habit interesting flower shape or improved vigor Nativars often have the same great qualities of their native parents being friendly to the environment by requiring less water fewer pesticides and fewer fertilizers It is important to note that nativars might not support wildlife as effectively as their native parents because their flower shapes and leaf chemistry have changed What are the benefits and challenges of nativars Benefits Nativars often have the characteristics of native plants They are Adapted to the region s rainfall requiring less irrigation Adapted to pressures of local pests and diseases requiring less pesticides Adapted to the regions soils requiring less fertilizers Some of the challenges of nativars Less genetic diversity if produced asexually monocultures succumb to pest pressures more rapidly than diverse populations Uncertain ecological role in supporting wildlife Change in flower morphology might make nectar and pollen unavailable to native pollinators Flowers might be sterile eliminating fruit Pest resistant nativars might have a different leaf chemistry from the species causing it to be an improper host for native insects If selected for strength and vigor nativars might outcompete other native plants becoming invasive We ll be featuring some great nativars at our Fall Plant Sale that starts this Friday at 10 a m Look for Threadleaf Coreopsis Coreopsis verticillata Sienna Sunset Sneezeweed Helenium flexuosum Tiny Dancer

    Original URL path: http://www.lewisginter.org/cultivars-nativars-oh-my/ (2016-02-13)
    Open archived version from archive

  • For Gardeners, Timing is Key & Fall is a Great Time to Plant - Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden
    popular 20 years ago to encourage homeowners to get active in their yards and gardens now Between Labor Day and Thanksgiving when air temperatures are cooler but the soil temperatures remain warm is actually the prime time for planting shrubs trees and perennials Hassold said Now also is ideal for cool season favorites like mums and pansies and for planting daffodils tulips hyacinth and other bulbs Likewise now is suitable for round two in the vegetable garden Roughly six weeks before the first hard frost is the time to nurture cool loving veggies such as broccoli cauliflower and leafy vegetables Often the harvest continues well past Thanksgiving in our moderate Zone 7 Why is fall gardening more successful Warmer soil A plant has time to establish its root system and acclimate to its new setting before the hot dry summer Cooler temperatures Fall s cloudy cooler days and more dependable rainfall also support root system development Fewer pests and less disease Insect and fungal activity typically lessen in autumn giving the plant a better chance for survival and success Seasonal sales You are in luck The Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden Fall Plant Sale with proceeds benefiting the Garden s educational mission is next week September 20 21st No admission is required for the plant sale To see the times and full list of vendors please visit our website Also if you can t make it next week garden centers often have late fall sales for pre winter clearance Be sure to check identification tags to verify blooming schedules and colors Fall offers a far superior environment for plants to prosper and grow Hassold said When plants succeed people tend to do more planting and that s a win win for everyone Editor s Note This article first published in the

    Original URL path: http://www.lewisginter.org/gardening-for-gardeners-timing-is-key/ (2016-02-13)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Find Out What Treasures We'll Have at the Fall Plant Sale! - Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden
    Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden Souvenir Plant is a hardy begonia Begonia grandis Alba These specimens are volunteers or seedlings taken from the beds of beautiful hardy begonia Alba growing in the Flagler Garden Begonia like many perennials do best when they are thinned to avoid overcrowding Alba is unusual because of the striking white color Acalypha wilkesiana or copper leaf Here s a partial list of plants for sale in the Bloemendaal Tent Hydrangea petiolaris Climbing Hydrangea Athyrium nipponicum var pictum Japanese Painted Fern Anthurium sp Anthurium Anemone x Fall Anemone Spathiphyllum Domino Peace Lily Iris siberica Steve Siberian Iris Acalypha wilkesiana Copper Leaf Carex buchanii Red Rooster Leatherleaf Sedge Polystichum acrostichoides Christmas Fern Polystichum polyblepharum Tassel Fern Rudbeckia laciniata Autumn Sun Cutleaf Coneflower Ficus Breeze Ficus Hemerocallis Beauty to Behold Daylily Codiaeum variegatum Revolutions Croton Symphyotrichum novi belgii New York Aster Purple love grass Epimedium x versicolor Bishop s Hat Stapelia grandiflora Starfish Flower Polygonatum odoratum Variegatum Variegated Solomon s Seal the 2013 Perennial Plant of the Year Spathiphyllum Alpha Peace Lily Pachysandra terminalis Japanese Pachysandra Spathiphyllum Jetty Junior Peace Lily Amsonia tabernaemontana var salicifolia Blue Star Boltonia asteroides Pink Beauty False Aster or Pink Boltonia Eragrostis spectablis Purple Love Grass Helenium flexuosum Tiny Dancer Sneezeweed Hemerocallis Daylily Lobelia cardinalis Black Truffle PP Cardinal Flower Sedum telephium Matrona Stonecrop Symphyotrichon novae angliae Vibrant Dome New England Aster Tricyrtis formosana Samurai toad lily Vernonia glauca Upland Ironweed Buxus sinica var insularis Justin Brouwers Justin Brouwers Boxwood Achillea millefolium Strawberry Seduction PP Yarrow Agastache x Black Adder Giant Hyssop Asclepias tuberosa Butterfly Weed Coreopsis verticillata Sienna Sunset Threadleaf Coreopsis Echinacea x Pixie Meadowbrite Coneflower Heuchera villosa Citronelle Hairy Alumroot Hypericum caylcinum Brigadoon St John s Wort Perovskia atriplicifolia Filigran Russian Sage Sedum x Cherry Tart PP Stonecrop Sedum x Dazzleberry PP Stonecrop Self seeded volunteer from Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden s beds From the Conservatory at Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden Sedum x Cherry Tart PP stonecrop Debbe Peck Garden Volunteer and retired Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden employee says there are so many great perennials many of them in bloom right now that you could make a complete shade or sun perennial garden with just the plants from Bloemendaal Tent You could just take a handful of these plants and create a great perennial garden that will attract birds and pollinators and many of them are natives I went to look at the plants last week and I was wowed There s so much color She offers these suggestions for pairing for a sunny perennial bed Rudbeckia laciniata Autumn Sun cutleaf coneflower Symphyotrichum novi belgii New York aster Helenium flexuosum Tiny Dancer sneezeweed Sneezeweed Achillea millefolium Strawberry Seduction PP yarrow Echinacea x Pixie Meadowbrite coneflower And for a shade perennial bed she would combine Begonia grandis Alba Polystichum acrostichoides Christmas fern Polystichum polyblepharum tassel fern Polygonatum odoratum Variegatum variegated Solomon s seal Tricyrtis formosana Samurai toad lily Also at the Fall Plant Sale the Henrico Master Gardeners Association will be offering demonstrations

    Original URL path: http://www.lewisginter.org/find-out-what-treasures-well-have-at-the-fall-plant-sale/ (2016-02-13)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Butterfly Curators: Our Favorite Things from Butterflies LIVE! - Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden
    hope you enjoy hearing from them Having a quiet moment to look at a butterfly and enjoy the iridescent beauty of its wings shining in the sun Lead Butterfly Curator Caroline Meehan This Common Morpho Morpho peleides is certainly putting on a beautiful shimmery display My favorite part of Butterflies LIVE is the daily release of brand new butterflies It is such a unique experience to watch these lovely winged creatures fly for the very first time Jane Cramer Assistant Butterfly Curator Don t forget we have butterfly releases at 10 a m each day and at 10 a m and 2 p m on Saturdays Here is Jane Cramer Assistant Butterfly curator releasing butterflies into the North Wing as visitors look on I enjoy when we have the display cages and people notice them It is a great opportunity to talk a little more about the life cycle or how moths and butterflies differ They tend to lead to more questions which is exciting Kendra Norrell Assistant Butterfly Curator Here is an Atlas Moth Attacus atlas that we had in a display cage earlier this summer Can you see the snake heads on its wings Atlas Moth Attacus atlas I enjoy watching the butterflies fly Some soar gently through the air some chase each other and some can fly from one side of the exhibit to the other within a few seconds They also fly from flower to flower drinking nectar They are all so different and it s fun to watch Annie Raup Assistant Butterfly Curator A Queen butterfly Danaus gilippus a cousin of the Monarch stopping to drink nectar from a lantana flower What is your favorite part of Butterflies LIVE About Jonah Holland Jonah Holland is PR Marketing Coordinator at Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden specializing in

    Original URL path: http://www.lewisginter.org/butterfly-curators-our-favorite-things-from-butterflies-live/ (2016-02-13)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Jewelweed to the Rescue! - Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden
    I just bought a bag of glycerin soap cubes 1 2 cup jewelweed maceration gather blooming jewelweed and combine in a blender with 1 cup water Use all parts of the plant in the maceration leaves stem and flower Instructions Melt soap in a double boiler or in the oven on low heat between the setting called warm and 200F Add jewelweed maceration stir until slightly cooled Stir to combine Pour into molds Cool and let cure until hard and dry It s folk medicine so this is not a proven cure Many people say that the soap helps wash away the oils of poison ivy and can help relieve the itchiness of the rash Garden volunteer Barb Sawyer who s been a loyal volunteer since the Children s Garden opened in 2005 recently was exposed to poison ivy while pulling weeds during one of her shifts at the Garden She says tiny blisters quickly began forming on my left hand Children s Garden Staff Heather Veneziano Kristi Orcutt and Katie Coyle came to my rescue with several suggestions I washed again with hand soap then with dish washing liquid and then with some jewelweed soap that Katie had made By the time I arrived at my car the blisters were gone and they never returned For more help in identifying jewelweed Virginia Tech Weed Identification Guide has some good photos and descriptions Jewelweed plant soap About Jonah Holland Jonah Holland is PR Marketing Coordinator at Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden specializing in social media She s been known to go for a walk and come back completely inspired to write a blog post on her newest found adventure You May Also Like Winter Interest Inspiration Education Nature California Dreaming Student Teacher Art Show http www botanicalswildcrafted com wildcrafted tincture jewelweed

    Original URL path: http://www.lewisginter.org/jewelweed-to-the-rescue/ (2016-02-13)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Hostas Make an Interesting Addition to Any Garden - Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden
    their beautiful foliage and shade tolerance In fact the color of the leaves can help determine how much shade is appropriate In general blue leafed hostas require the most shade while hostas with gold yellow or white leaves can tolerate more sun Most hostas grow best with morning sun exposure and afternoon shade Hosta foliage ranges from light to dark and from solid to bi color Pictured clockwise from top left Golden Scepter Robert Frost Dream Queen and Halcyon While hostas are best known for their beautiful leaves some also have lovely if unusual blooms that grow at the top of long stalks A hosta bloom Come stroll through the Asian Valley and along the Woodland Walk to see the beautiful foliage and blooms of our many varieties of hostas About Caitlin Puffenberger Caitlin Puffenberger is a former PR Marketing Intern You May Also Like Winter Interest Inspiration Education Nature California Dreaming Student Teacher Art Show Don t Miss Out Subscribe to the Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden Blog Posts by Topic Blooms Gardens Community Kitchen Garden Education Classes Events Families Kids Gardening Horticulture Gardens Through the Seasons Making a Difference in the Community More about the Garden Sustainable Practices Uncategorized

    Original URL path: http://www.lewisginter.org/hostas-make-an-interesting-addition-to-any-garden/ (2016-02-13)
    Open archived version from archive