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  • Lipan Apache Tribe: The Meaning of the Tribal Name Lipan, Spanish Translation
    Cuenca McKenzie de Canadá a su patria eventual de Texas El Lipan y todos los apaches ven la Tierra como un círculo suspendido en el espacio en los cuatro puntos cardinales Cada dirección es representada por un color Cuando los apaches Lipan antiguos emigraron del norte y se movieron a la parte este en Texas ellos se movían del blanco del norte hacia el negro del este En una paleta

    Original URL path: http://www.lipanapache.org/Museum/museum_lipanname_spanish.html (2016-02-09)
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  • Lipan Apache Tribe Museum and Cultural Center: Tribal Bands
    groups of extended families Each ranchería leader or sub chief owed allegiance to the chief of the band who dictated the migrations of the rancherías declared war and negotiated peace 1 The Sun Otter band Tche shä led by Cuelgas de Castro ranged from San Antonio to Laredo particularly Atascosa County 2 The Green Mountain band Tsél tátlidshä ranged into south Texas from Refugio to Nueces Counties absorbed by High Beaked Moccasin band 3 High Beaked Moccasin band Kóke metcheskó lähä led by Zapato Sas and Flacco 4 The Red Hair band Tséral tuétahä led by Cabellos Colorado in 1739 was absorbed by the Sun Otters or Green Mountain band 5 Fire or Camp Circle band Ndáwe qóhä inhabited areas from the San Saba to the upper Nueces River 6 Little Breech clout band Tcha shka ózhäyê led by Pocarropa inhabited the lower Pecos region 7 Pulverizing or Rubbing band Tchó kanä ranged from the upper Colorado south into Mexico was absorbed by the Little Breech clout band 8 Uplanders Tüzhä or Täzhä lived along upper Rio Grande in the Organ or Sacramento Mountains of southern New Mexico 9 Prairie Men Kó l Kahä ranged from the upper Colorado to

    Original URL path: http://www.lipanapache.org/Museum/museum_bands.html (2016-02-09)
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  • Lipan Apache Tribe Museum and Cultural Center: Tribal Bands, Spanish Translation
    las rancherías declarada guerra y negociaba la paz 1 El grupo Nutria de Sol Tche shä conducido por Cuelgas de Castro recorrio de San Antonio a Laredo en particular el Condado de Atascosa 2 El grupo Montaña Verde Tsél tátlidshä recorrio al sur de Texas desde Refugio hasta los Condados Nueces absorbido por el grupo Mocasína Alta Picuda 3 El grupo Mocasína Alta Picuda Kóke metcheskó lähä conducido por Zapato Sas y Flacco 4 El grupo Pelo Rojo Tséral tuétahä conducido por Cabellos Colorado en 1739 fue absorbido por Nutrias de Sol o el grupo Montaña Verde 5 El grupo Fuego o Círculo de Campo Ndáwe qóhä habitaba las áreas de Saba San hasta el Río Nueces superior 6 El grupo Tortazo del Pequeño Pantalon Tcha shka ózhäyê conducido por Pocarropa habitaba la región más abajo de Pecos 7 El Grupo Pulverización o Frotamiento Tchó kanä recorrio del Colorado superior hasta el sur de México fue absorbido por el grupo Tortazo del Pequeño Pantalon 8 Los de La Tierra De Arriba Tüzhä or Täzhä vivian hacia la parte superior larga del Río Grande en las Montañas Sacramento u Órgano de Nuevo México hasta el sur 9 El grupo Hombres de

    Original URL path: http://www.lipanapache.org/Museum/museum_bands_spanish.html (2016-02-09)
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  • Lipan Apache Tribe Museum and Cultural Center: The Lipan Homeland of Many Houses- Ki-aah-hii
    also had many horses and the Lipan Apaches wanted and needed horses By 1700 they had moved into Jumano and Tejas territory They might have stayed along the upper Colorado and Brazos forever but when the Comanches entered Texas around 1700 a bitter war erupted between the Lipans and the Comanches for control of the buffalo plains of north Texas One nine day battle fought around Wichita Falls left so many dead warriors that it was said their bodies were piled up like leaves The Lipans began to look to the south for a safe haven from their Comanche enemies By 1730 the Lipans inhabited broad areas of Texas from the upper Brazos in the east through the upper Colorado of central Texas to the Pecos River in the west The tribe had also begun to move southward where they came into contact with the Spanish at San Antonio de Béxar The Lipan Apaches found everything they needed in south central Texas buffalo and deer on the Gulf plains east of San Antonio cactus tunas and agave south of San Antonio wild plums in the Hill Country so they claimed the San Antonio area as their homeland and named it

    Original URL path: http://www.lipanapache.org/Museum/museum_homeland.html (2016-02-09)
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  • Lipan Apache Tribe Museum and Cultural Center: The Lipan Homeland of Many Houses- Ki-aah-hii, Spanish Translation
    querian y necesitaban caballos Hacia 1700 ellos se habían movido en Jumano y territorio Tejas Ellos podrían haberse quedado a lo largo del Colorado superior y Brazos para siempre pero cuando los Comanches entraron en Texas alrededor de 1700 una guerra amarga hizo erupción entre los Lipans y los Comanches por el control de las llanuras de búfalo de Texas del norte Una batalla de nueve días luchada alrededor de las Caídas de Wichita dejo a tantos guerreros muertos que fue dicho sus cuerpos fueron amontonados como hojas Los Lipanes comenzaron a contemplar el sur como un asilo seguro contra sus enemigos Comanches Hacia 1730 Los Lipanes habitaron amplias áreas de Texas de Brazos superior en el este por el Colorado superior de Texas central al Río Pecos en el Oeste El tribu también había comenzado a moverse hacia el sur donde ellos entraron en contacto con los Españoles en San Antonio de Béxar Los Apaches Lipan encontraron todo que ellos necesitaron en Texas central del sur búfalo y venados en las llanuras de Golfo al este de San Antonio tunas de nopal y agave al sur de San Antonio ciruelas salvajes en el País de Colina entonces ellos reclamaron

    Original URL path: http://www.lipanapache.org/Museum/museum_homeland_spanish.html (2016-02-09)
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  • Lipan Apache Tribe Museum and Cultural Center: Everyday Life
    as to the location of the herd Then the men would ride out and surround the herd advancing simultaneously on all sides Antelope which the Lipan called tcela a were also hunted in the same manner Deer called kockeya were generally hunted by small groups of men or by individuals who tracked the deer on horseback Lipan hunters were careful to always leave the eye of the animal and pieces of meat from between the ribs for Crow mythic guardian of the hunt Smaller animals such as rabbits turkey quail and javelinas were also hunted The Lipan also gathered and processed many plant foods The hunt was an activity carried out by men but the gathering of plant foods was done by women who wove baskets in order to carry the harvest back to camp Before setting out to harvest cactus tunas in the spring the women danced The Lipan harvested and processed a wide variety of cactus species yucca mescal tule palm and mesquite in order to supplement the meat in their diet Flavoring and seasoning was provided by mountain chilies and wild onions Honey and wild plums were also gathered The Lipans practiced a limited form of agriculture

    Original URL path: http://www.lipanapache.org/Museum/museum_lipanlife.html (2016-02-09)
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  • Lipan Apache Tribe Museum and Cultural Center: Biographies of Great Lipan Chiefs
    a newly independent Mexico Yolcna Pocarropa was the successor to Poca Ropa possibly his son or grandson After signing the Bustamante Treaty Chiefs Yolcna Pocarropa and Cuelgas de Castro journeyed to Mexico City in order to ratify the treaty and meet with representatives of Mexican Emperor Iturbidé Yolcna Pocarropa last appears in the historical records of Texas in 1828 when he negotiated a second treaty at Laredo By 1828 Yolcna Pocarropa had relocated his band from west Texas and settled them at a fixed settlement near the town of Laredo By 1830 the Pocarropa band had moved across the Rio Grande into Tamaulipas settling downriver from Laredo at a location now covered by Falcon Lake although the band crossed frequently back and forth from Mexico into Texas The descendants of Yolcna Pocarropa have inhabited the Falcon Lake to McAllen area of south Texas from 1830 until the present day Cuelgas de Castro abt 1792 1842 1844 Cuelgas de Castro was an early to mid nineteenth century chief of the Sun Otter band which had traditionally inhabited the San Antonio and south Texas region Cuelgas born about 1792 was the son of Josef Chiquito and grandson of Josef Grande el Manco Big Joseph the One Armed progenitor of the primary line of Sun Otter chiefs The Castro surname was informally bestowed on the family and particularly on the infant Cuelgas by Ramon de Castro military commander of the northeastern Spanish frontier provinces from 1787 to 1792 The descendants of Cuelgas retained the Castro surname throughout the nineteenth century and bear the surname today When Cuelgas was about eighteen years old he and other Lipans joined Samuel Kemperer in attacking San Antonio during the Gutierrez Magee expedition 1812 although Cuelgas did not participate in the later Battle of Medina 1814 Cuelgas de Castro had risen to leadership of the Sun Otter band by 1822 when he traveled to Mexico City with Yolcna Pocarropa to ratify the Bustamante treaty with the new government of Mexico one provision of that treaty offered land grants to the Lipans in order to bring them under the cares of civilization In 1826 Cuelgas signed a second treaty at Laredo with the government of Mexico Cuelgas was commissioned as a lieutenant colonel and he drew a salary from the Republic of Mexico Cuelgas band received gifts and food subsidies distributed from Laredo through 1827 After Texas independence in 1836 Chief Cuelgas de Castro his son John or Juan Castro and warriors from the Sun Otter band fought as auxiliary troops in Texas militia engagements with the Comanches most notably the attack on a Comanche camp led by Col J H Moore in 1839 in which captive Matilda Lockhart was rescued In 1838 Cuelgas signed the Treaty of Live Oak Point a treaty of friendship and mutual aid between his people and the Republic of Texas Although the Sun Otter band traditionally inhabited the San Antonio area they ranged into south Texas and across the Rio Grande south of

    Original URL path: http://www.lipanapache.org/Museum/museum_chiefs.html (2016-02-09)
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  • Lipan Apache Tribe of Texas: Lipan Weapons
    a fire and running the arrow through the teeth biting them at intervals in order to straighten the wood Arrows were also coated in clotted blood or poisonous plant substances in order to imbue the arrow with ritual significance and insure that the arrow wreaked maximum damage to the enemy The bow and arrow were carried in a buckskin quiver which hung from the left shoulder This meant that the arrows were drawn and fired with the right hand Many Lipan men also cut their hair on the left side of their head at the top of their ear wearing their long braid over their right shoulder One reason for this was probably so that the braid and hair did not interfere with the quiver strap or with the left arm which held the bow A Lipan lance was made by attaching a piece of steel usually a Spanish saber to a long piece of wood with sinew The steel tip was about 2½ feet in length and the wooden shaft was about 8 or 9 feet long The lance was adorned with feathers and metal ornaments After 1750 the Lipans began to obtain French muskets through trade with east Texas tribes The east Texas tribes had been given the muskets by French traders in Louisiana and along the Red River By 1780 every Lipan man was armed with at least one gun and had become expert in their use A Wooden stand was mounted on the pommel of their saddle so that a warrior could rest their gun on the stand in order to be able to take a better shot There is also some evidence which indicates that the Lipans had learned how to make gunpowder by 1800 although they obtained most of their gunpowder and ammunition through

    Original URL path: http://www.lipanapache.org/Museum/museum_weapons.html (2016-02-09)
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