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  • Mercury
    easily evaporates into a gas and it makes a great thermometer Do you have or work with any of these items that may contain mercury Relays Gauges Thermostats Manometers Neon Lamps Thermometers Dental Amalgam Mercury Switches Thermostat Probes Fluorescent Lamps Metal Halide Lamps Laboratory Solutions Mercury Vapor Lamps High Pressure Sodium Lamps Proper handling and disposal and the evaluation of alternative products are the keys to minimizing mercury impacts on human health and the environment Handling Disposal Spill Instructions Dane County Clean Sweep Mercury Mercury is TOXIC The extremely toxic nature of mercury to living things is one reason mercury has been used in so many different ways Mercury compounds are used to preserve medicine prevent fungal and mildew growth heal wounds and preserve seeds To protect our local streams our wastewater treatment plant is subject to very stringent limitations for the concentration of mercury that may be present in the treated effluent We need everyone s help to keep mercury out of the wastewater Mercury can be found in many old products and even some modern ones Mercury amalgamation with silver and tin is commonly referred to as dental silver fillings Over the past 10 years the dental industry

    Original URL path: http://www.madsewer.org/Programs-Initiatives/Mercury (2016-05-01)
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  • Madison Metropolitan Sewerage District > Programs/Initiatives > Chloride Reduction
    a tablespoon of salt in five gallons of water The wastewater that reaches our facility contains these higher concentrations created from various sources such as water softening systems industrial sources and winter ice control Wh y should we Change While it only costs 20 cents to add a pound of salt to water it costs five dollars to remove it MMSD undertook a study which showed it could cost from 300 million to 2 3 billion to remove the required amount of chloride Rather than adding costly treatment in order to continue protecting our freshwater life we have other options Together we can take small but helpful steps in order to reduce the amount of salt put into water by examining our current water practices By understanding where this salt comes from we can all identify and form habits that help maintain healthy waterways without sacrificing our well being What Can We Do Look to Your Water Softener Initial studies indicate that approximately 100 000 water softeners are tributary to MMSD s Nine Springs Wastewater Treatment Plant The following steps can greatly decrease your water softener s salt output Optimize water softeners our household softening study found that on average this can reduce salt use by 27 Local water quality professionals provide this service Replace older or inefficient softeners when replacing a softener with high efficiency softeners the same study found 48 savings on the amount of salt used Some existing models can be particularly wasteful on salt and water use Timer based softeners which regenerate after a certain time period vs gallons used or hardness readings have not been allowed by Wisconsin s plumbing code for over 15 years if you have one look into replacing it If you re in the market for a new water softener look

    Original URL path: http://www.madsewer.org/Programs-Initiatives/Chloride-Reduction (2016-05-01)
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  • Madison Metropolitan Sewerage District > Programs/Initiatives > Phosphorus Harvesting
    rich liquid filtrate is captured 10 3 2013 2 32 00 PM 16 This is the underside of the gravity belt thickener the blue belt is visible at the top showing the fairly clear phosphorus rich liquid that was separated from the solids This is what we will harvest phosphorus from 10 3 2013 2 32 00 PM 17 These are two of the reactor feed pumps that move the filtrate from the gravity belt thickener building to feed the phosphorus harvesting reactors 10 3 2013 2 32 00 PM 18 The phosphorus sent to the reactors is in a dissolved form and we need to form a solid particle precipitate to separate it from the liquid A reactor is used to create the ideal conditions to form this solid particle precipitate which is called struvite which consists of equal chemical molar ratios of magnesium ammonia and phosphate Our two reactors are called the Ostara Pearl 2000 series We have two reactors that are projected to handle our phosphorus harvesting needs through 2030 10 3 2013 2 32 00 PM 19 Flow enters the reactors from the bottom along with a recycle stream that lifts the bed of struvite particles called prills As the dissolved phosphorus moves upward through the reactor chemicals are added to optimize the conditions for the formation of struvite This struvite forms on the outside of the prills until they reach the desired size and some are harvested off The specific size selected for harvest is determined by demand within the fertilizer industry 10 3 2013 2 32 00 PM 20 After harvesting the prills they pass through a screen to separate them from most of the water Pictured here is the product dryer which uses heated air to complete the drying and prepare the product

    Original URL path: http://www.madsewer.org/Programs-Initiatives/Phosphorus-Harvesting (2016-05-01)
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  • Hauled Waste
    Porta potty wastewater Leachate from local closed landfills Grease from local restaurants and food service establishments Car wash sand Prior approval required Food wastes Industrial wastes Wastewater generated Out of State is not accepted Hauled Waste MMSD provides valuable treatment services to rural homes and businesses of Dane County and the surrounding region The pumping company has two options for rural wastewater apply to farm fields under approved methods or deliver the septage to a wastewater treatment plant We have offered a septage disposal station at the Nine Springs Wastewater Treatment Plant for nearly 30 years RV Owners are welcome to use our septage receiving station which is designed for very large vehicles during business hours There is no charge for RV s to dump graywater You will also find facilities designed for your RV nearby at the Lake Farm Park campground 10 charge for non campers Septage Receiving Area at Nine Springs Treatment Plant 2016 Disposal Rates All rates are per 1000 gallons Waste Type Rate Septic Tank 21 60 Holding Tank 4 06 Grease Trap 91 80 Settling Basin 148 00 Portable Toilet 85 90 Admin Charges Per Month 27 79 Hours of Operation The Gates are open

    Original URL path: http://www.madsewer.org/Programs-Initiatives/Hauled-Waste (2016-05-01)
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  • Madison Metropolitan Sewerage District > Education > Take a Tour
    request form and we will contact you shortly to confirm your tour Videos Drip and Drop Water Recycling for Life Take a Tour Come and see how we protect public health and the environment The Madison Metropolitan Sewerage District conducts scheduled tours of its Nine Springs Treatment Plant Conducting tours is part of the District s continuing efforts to be a good neighbor and a positive influence on our community Over 2000 people visit our plant each year A typical tour lasts approximately an hour and a half Best starting times for tours are Monday through Friday between 7 30am and 3 00pm We do not conduct tours on major holidays We suggest wearing comfortable clothes and very comfortable shoes no open toed shoes sandals or flip flops as there will be a lot of walking and stair climbing We do not cancel our tours due to weather unless it poses a danger to our visitors so dress appropriately for the weather With advance notice we can make arrangements for individuals with physical handicaps to participate in our tours but some portions of our normal tours are inaccessible If you would like to take a tour fill out the tour

    Original URL path: http://www.madsewer.org/Education/Take-a-Tour (2016-05-01)
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  • Madison Metropolitan Sewerage District > Education > Pollution Prevention
    salt use Proper Disposal of Mercury Steps to Greener Living Flushable Microconstituents in Water Pollution Prevention The goal of the District s Pollution Prevention Program is to reduce or eliminate the use of substances that are not easily removed during wastewater treatment and to ensure that they are disposed of properly when used District Employees Partnering with MedDrop This is accomplished by working closely with homeowners schools businesses industries health care facilities and other partners For example the District is Reducing chloride salt use with a focus on commercial and residential water softening deicing activities and industrial use Reducing mercury levels by requiring dental clinics to install devices that capture mercury and prevent it from going down the drain Partnering with the Safe Communities MedDrop Program to provide a safe disposal option for unused medications Pollution prevention activities also involve identifying safe disposal methods for products that do not break down in water when flushed like baby wipes Even many items that are marketed as disposable and or flushable do not break down and can end up clogging pipes causing problems in both homes and at the wastewater treatment plant District staff also works with specific industries through our Pretreatment

    Original URL path: http://www.madsewer.org/Education/Pollution-Prevention (2016-05-01)
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  • Treatment Plant Process
    61 pumping stations that are spread throughout Madison and the surrounding municipalities The pumping stations then transport the wastewater to the MMSD plant where approximately 42 million gallons of wastewater end up daily Once wastewater gets to the plant the treatment process begins To help explain the treatment process we have 2 friends Drip and Drop who will take you through the treatment process at MMSD Primary Treatment Influent When Drip and Drop and all of the incoming water called influent enter the MMSD plant they pass through fine screens to remove rags and other large material such as paper towels feminine hygiene products and flushable wipes All of the wastewater passes through round holes on a screen Drip and Drop head to the Grit Chambers next The wastewater is about 99 9 water A vortex action is used in the grit chambers to allow sand gravel and other inorganic solids to accumulate in the bottom of the Grit Chamber Tanks Primary Settling tanks Primary Settling Tank is the next stop for Drip and Drop these tanks are about 9 feet deep and anywhere from 86 to 100 feet long As Drip and Drop enter the primary settling tanks also referred to as sedimentation tanks they are slowed down to allow heavier solids to settle to the bottom of the tanks The settled solids are called primary sludge Drip and Drop spend about 2 hours in the primary settling tanks Next up is Drip s favorite place Secondary Treatment Aeration Tanks This stop is sometimes referred to as Secondary Treatment This is where the biological treatment begins Air is pumped into large mixing tanks that mix the wastewater with bacteria and microorganisms that will consume the organic matter and nutrients that contaminate the water as food Drip doesn t mind

    Original URL path: http://www.madsewer.org/Education/Treatment-Plant-Process (2016-05-01)
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  • Madison Metropolitan Sewerage District > Education > Bird Observation Area
    Reduction Phosphorus Harvesting Hauled Waste Education Take a Tour Pollution Prevention Treatment Plant Process Bird Observation Area Planning Facility Plans Budget Finance Permits Ordinances Sustainability Brochure View our Brochure Bird Observation Area Madison Metropolitan Sewerage District not only helps the environment by recycling water our reconstructed lagoons provide an excellent resting and feeding opportunity for a wide variety of birds and other animals The District invites you to come walk

    Original URL path: http://www.madsewer.org/Education/Bird-Observation-Area (2016-05-01)
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