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  • Network Participants | Markle | Advancing America's Future
    cards work across competing banks because there are worldwide networks that tie them together People trust strangers on eBay because there is a trusted payment network PayPal as well as a network of buyers and sellers who provide accountability by collectively and publicly rating each other Sites like Wikipedia Craigslist and MySpace have created arrays of communities of people with similar interests A key ingredient to the successes cited above is a fresh openness toward consumer access to and contribution of information By contrast the health care industry has moved more slowly toward providing consumers with online access to health data and interactive services Personal health information is different often more complex scattered sensitive less structured than the other types of information cited above However electronic personal health records PHRs represent an emerging vehicle to increase consumer participation in the health sector Personal Health Records PHRs PHRs encompass a wide variety of applications that enable people to collect view manage or share copies of their health information or transactions electronically Many PHR applications in existence today facilitate the viewing of health information A new generation of PHRs promotes the development of multiple and diverse applications that act on personal health information to help users with specific tasks Although there are many variants PHRs are based on the fundamental concept of facilitating an individual s access to and creation of personal health information in a usable computer application that the individual or a designee controls We do not envision PHRs as a substitute for the professional and legal obligation for recordkeeping by health care professionals and entities However they do portend a beneficial trend toward greater engagement of consumers in their own health and health care Today s PHRs are generally un networked They typically require the consumer to enter data manually or get a view of information from a single entity such as one health plan one pharmacy or perhaps one health care provider s electronic health record EHR Yet most people have relationships with many different doctors and health care entities particularly those Americans with multiple chronic conditions more than 60 million today and estimated to reach 81 million by 2020 5 must coordinate their care across several providers and entities If the PHR is limited to one particular relationship it may not meet the long term needs of many whose information is dispersed across organizations Some people in a stable relationship with one integrated delivery system may today have their information adequately accessible through an application from that institution However for most people over time PHRs would be much more useful if they were networked to aggregate the consumer s health information across multiple sources e g the consumer s insurance eligibility and claims her records from all of her doctors her lab results her pharmacy services her diagnostic imaging etc Networked PHRs as Tools for Transformation The mere aggregation of the consumer s data however should not be an end in itself The true test is whether the network makes it easier for ordinary people to coordinate and engage more actively in their own health and health care We see a networked environment for PHRs as a foundation for Americans to improve the quality and safety of the care they receive to communicate better with their doctors to manage their own health and to take care of loved ones This paper argues that consumers can help accelerate transformative change particularly in a networked information environment However we emphasize that clinicians also have a critical role in realizing the full potential of networked PHRs Consumers continue to see doctors and other health professionals as the key agents of their care and the most trusted hosts of their personal health information To take advantage of networked personal health information both consumers and clinicians must be open to changes in their relationships responsibilities and workflows Network enabled efficiencies and safety improvements are more likely to occur if consumers and health care professionals act as partners who share access to and responsibility for updating personal health information The status quo in which most personal health information under the custodianship of providers payers and other entities is largely un networked makes it more difficult for consumers to gather their data from multiple sources more difficult to choose freely among providers and thus more difficult to manage their health The Rationale for Networking Consumers Entrenched problems in the American health care system are well documented Among the oft cited deficiencies Fragmentation that leads to inefficiency and duplication of efforts and costs 6 7 Disappointing levels of safety and quality that lead to high rates of medical errors 8 9 10 Frequent unavailability of vital information at point of care 11 High costs that are growing at an unsustainable rate 12 13 An overall lack of patient centeredness 14 Rapid consumer adoption of newly networked services has proven to be possible indeed phenomenal in other sectors Consumers can adapt to technology and culture transformation more rapidly than large health care institutions with long histories of business processes and legacy systems Furthermore even as the majority of clinicians continue to keep consumers data on paper other important personal health information namely claims pharmacy diagnostic images and lab data are available in digital form today We conclude that the immediate effort to catalyze health care transformation must include a strategy to create a networked environment for PHRs and related technologies that takes advantage of these currently available digital data streams Providers can gradually form and join networks as their systems increasingly interoperate In fact networked connections to PHRs could help accelerate the EHR adoption curve as clinicians see advantages to joining the network There are additional strong rationales for involving consumers in a much needed transformation toward greater information access and transparency First the health care consumer has the largest stake in the contents of such information The consumer s life is put at risk when preventable errors occur due to lack of information Second the consumer is the ultimate payer of health care services Consumers are being asked to pay directly for a larger proportion of their care 15 16 Third younger generations expect to use technology in almost all aspects of their lives Fourth as the number and complexity of diagnostic and treatment modalities grows at a rapid pace patients are increasingly required to share the responsibility of decision making with their health care providers Furthermore patients are often in the best position to gather and share information with providers 17 18 For example a physician might know that a medication has been prescribed for a patient But without asking the patient the doctor does not know whether the patient actually took the medication how well it worked what other remedies she is taking or whether she had side effects Empowering health care consumers by placing information directly in their hands has the potential to radically improve health care 19 20 PHRs are still in the early development stages and a great deal of study is needed to measure the benefits and risks of PHRs Consumers patients and their families vary widely in the responsibilities they each wish to maintain in their own health However as noted in Connecting for Health s 2004 report Connecting Americans to Their Health Care preliminary evidence suggests that PHRs have potential to Empower patients and their families 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 Improve the patient clinician relationship 29 30 31 32 33 Increase patient safety 34 35 36 37 Improve the quality of care 38 39 40 41 42 Improve efficiency and convenience 43 44 45 46 47 48 Improve privacy safeguards 49 50 Save money 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 Lastly there is general agreement among many stakeholders including those listed below that PHRs should be a key part of health care modernization and reform efforts Government bodies like the National Committee on Vital and Health Statistics 58 and the American Health Information Community 59 Professional societies such as the American Medical Association 60 and the American Health Information Management Association 61 Consumer groups such as AARP and the American Diabetes Association 62 Health insurance plan associations like America s Health Insurance Plans and the Blue Cross Blue Shield Association 63 Bipartisan political leaders 64 Addressing Key Policy Concerns Will Be Core to the Transformation Process Although a networked PHR would provide significant benefits to consumers the exchange of health data over an electronic network poses serious concerns Confidentiality of personal health information is a core American value 65 There is evidence that Americans support a network for health information exchange if security and confidentiality safeguards are sufficient 66 Thus before encouraging the ubiquitous networking of PHRs to other health information systems we must establish a common understanding and an adequate set of shared rules We need a technical approach that allows access controls to keep information flowing among people authorized to see it and protected from unauthorized access or use The selection and implementation of technical elements are themselves aids or obstacles to confidentiality and security If PHRs can be authorized to connect securely to multiple data streams on the network then the competition among PHRs will be based on service features and value to the consumer not mere custody of the consumer s data All of the participants within the networked environment including health care institutions and professionals insurance companies labs pharmacy services employers and consumers themselves must agree to basic principles for providing individuals the ability to obtain personal health information about them and security and confidentiality protections must be baked in to the network design We do not know what kinds of applications and functions will be most effective in encouraging the transformation we seek The mere presentation of health data to consumers is not as likely to be transformative as new applications to interpret and apply the data in innovative ways that provide specific benefit to specific people and connect them with their health team and caregivers Although the Common Framework for Networked Personal Health Information recommends a framework for enabling networked PHRs we purposely avoid recommendations on what those applications should be or do Development of a sufficiently flexible network will enable the use of a great variety of personal health technology applications including many that we cannot imagine today Connecting for Health thanks Josh Lemieux Markle Foundation Daren Nicholson MD an independent contractor and David Lansky PhD for drafting this paper parts of which were originally published by the Markle Foundation in December 2006 The Washington Post homepage on the Internet Washington The Washington Post Company c2006 cited 2006 May 8 Top Web Domains about 4 screens Boutin P A Grand Unified Theory of YouTube and MySpace Slate serial on the Internet 2006 April 28 cited 2006 May 2 about 5 screens Available at http www slate com id 2140635 Clarke G Wikipedia Eclipses CIA The Register serial on the Internet 2005 September 7 cited 2006 May 4 about 3 screens Available at http www theregister co uk 2005 09 07 wikipedia growth Boutin P A Grand Unified Theory of YouTube and MySpace Slate serial on the Internet 2006 April 28 cited 2006 May 2 about 5 screens Available at http www slate com id 2140635 Anderson G Partnership for Solutions slide presentation 2004 cited 2006 May 2 Available at http www partnershipforsolutions org DMS files anderson cdc ppt Shi L Singh D Essentials of the US Health Care System Sudbury MA Jones and Bartlett Publishers Inc 2004 Blendon RJ et al Common Concerns amid Diverse Systems Health Care Experiences in Five Countries Health Aff 2003 May Jun 22 3 106 21 Institute of Medicine To Err is Human Building a Safer Health System Washington National Academies Press 2000 McGlynn EA Asch SM Adams J Keesey J Hicks J DeCristofaro A Kerr EA The Quality of Health Care Delivered to Adults in the United States N Engl J Med 2003 June 26 348 26 2635 2645 Miller MR Zhan C Pediatric Patient Safety in Hospitals A National Picture in 2000 Pediatrics 2004 Sep 114 3 907 Connecting for Health Achieving Electronic Connectivity in Healthcare monograph on the Internet New York Markle Foundation 2004 cited 2006 August 1 Available at http www markle org publications 842 achieving electronic connectivity health care summary financial incentives recommen Connecting for Health Steering Group and Personal Health Technology Council Opportunities for CMS Action in Support of Personal Health Records monograph on the Internet New York Markle Foundation 2005 cited 2006 May 17 Available at http www markle org publications 1256 opportunities cms actions support personal health records OECD homepage on the Internet Paris OECD updated 2004 March 6 cited 2006 June 14 Health Spending in Most OECD Countries Rises with the U S far Outstripping all Others about 4 screens Institute of Medicine Crossing the Quality Chasm A New Health System for the 21st Century Washington National Academies Press 2001 Robinson J Health Savings Accounts The Ownership Society in Health Care N Engl J Med 2005 Sep 353 12 1199 1202 Maze J Consumerism Creeping into Health Plans The Post and Courier Charleston SC 2005 December 5 final ed E6 Tang P et al Personal Health Records Definitions Benefits and Strategies for Overcoming Barriers to Adoption J Am Med Inform Assoc 2006 Mar Apr 13 2 121 126 Denton IC Will Patients use Electronic Personal Health Records Responses From a Real Life Experience J of Healthc Inf Manag 2001 Fall 15 3 251 259 Tang P et al Personal Health Records Definitions Benefits and Strategies for Overcoming Barriers to Adoption J Am Med Inform Assoc 2006 Mar Apr 13 2 121 126 American Health Information Management Association homepage on the Internet Chicago American Health Information Management Association updated 2005 July 25 cited 2006 May 8 AHIMA press release Personal Health Records belong to the Patient about 1 screen Masys D Baker D Butros A Cowles KE Giving Patients Access to their Medical Records via the Internet The PCASSO Experience J Am Med Inform Assoc 2002 Mar Apr 9 2 181 91 Jimison HB Sher PP Advances in Health Information Technology for Patients J AHIMA 1998 Sep 69 8 42 6 Tang PC Newcomb C Informing Patients A Guide for Providing Patient Health Information J Am Med Inform Assoc 1998 Nov Dec 5 6 563 70 Winkelman WJ Leonard KJ Overcoming Structural Constraints to Patient Utilization of Electronic Medical Records A Critical Review and Proposal for an Evaluation Framework J Am Med Inform Assoc 2004 Mar Apr 11 2 151 61 Bluml BM McKenney JM Cziraky MJ Pharmaceutical Care Services and Results in Project ImPACT Hyperlipidemia J Am Pharm Assoc Wash 2000 Mar Apr 40 2 157 65 Broder C Projects Tap Technology for Disease Management iHealthBeat serial on the Internet 2003 June 10 about 3 screens Neville R Greene A McLeod J Tracy A Surie J Mobile Phone Text Messaging Can Help Young People Manage Asthma BMJ 2002 Sep 14 325 7364 600 Billault B DeGoulet P Devries C Plouin P Chattellier G Menard J Use of a Standardized Personal Medical Record by Patients with Hypertension A Randomized Controlled Prospective Trial MD Comput 1995 Jan Feb 12 1 31 5 Tang PC Newcomb C Informing Patients A Guide for Providing Patient Health Information J Am Med Inform Assoc 1998 Nov Dec 5 6 563 70 Fierman A Rosen C Legano L Lim S Mendelsohn A Dreyer B Immunization Status as Determined by Patients Hand Held Cards vs Medical Records Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med 1996 Aug 150 8 863 6 MacDonald K Online Patient Provider Communication Tools An Overview monograph on the Internet San Francisco California Health Care Foundation 2003 November cited 2006 June 15 Available at http www chcf org topics view cfm itemid 21600 Dishman E Sherry J Changing Practices Computing Technology in the Shifting Landscape of American Healthcare Santa Clara Intel Corporation 1999 Von Knoop C Lovich D Silverstein MB Tutty M Vital Signs E Health in the United States monograph on the Internet Boston Boston Consulting Group 2003 cited 2006 June 15 Kaushal R Shojania KG Bates DW Effects of Computerized Physician Order Entry and Clinical Decision Support Systems on Medication Safety A Systematic Review Arch Intern Med 2003 Jun 23 163 12 1409 16 Potts AL Barr FE Gregory DF Wright L Patel NR Computerized Physician Order Entry and Medication Errors in a Pediatric Clinical Care Unit Pediatrics 2004 Jan 113 1 Pt 1 59 63 Bennett JW Glasziou PP Computerized Reminders and Feedback in Medication Management A Systematic Review of Randomized Controlled Trials Med J Aust 2003 Mar 3 178 5 217 22 Miller RH Sim I Newman J Electronic Medical Records Lessons from Small Physician Practices monograph on the Internet San Francisco California Health Care Foundation 2003 October cited 2006 June 15 Available at http www chcf org topics view cfm itemID 21521 Bluml BM McKenney JM Cziraky MJ Pharmaceutical Care Services and Results in Project ImPACT Hyperlipidemia J Am Pharm Assoc Wash 2000 Mar Apr 40 2 157 65 Tang PC Newcomb C Informing Patients A Guide for Providing Patient Health Information J Am Med Inform Assoc 1998 Nov Dec 5 6 563 70 Bennett JW Glasziou PP Computerized Reminders and Feedback in Medication Management A Systematic Review of Randomized Controlled Trials Med J Aust 2003 Mar 3 178 5 217 22 Neville R Greene A McLeod J Tracy A Surie J Mobile Phone Text Messaging Can Help Young People Manage Asthma BMJ 2002 Sep 14 325 7364 600 Winkelman WJ Leonard KJ Overcoming Structural Constraints to Patient Utilization of Electronic Medical Records A Critical Review and Proposal for an Evaluation Framework J Am Med Inform Assoc 2004 Mar Apr 11 2 151 61 Huff C Medical Paperwork Pains Patients Seeking Records Sometimes Frustrated Arlington Star Telegram Forth Worth TX 1999 January 11 1B 5B Miller RH Sim I Newman J Electronic Medical Records Lessons from Small Physician Practices monograph on the Internet

    Original URL path: http://www.markle.org/health/markle-common-framework/connecting-consumers/network-participants (2016-02-10)
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  • Consumer Policy: Markle Connecting for Health Common Framework for Networked Personal Health Information | Markle | Advancing America's Future
    Sections About Health Our Impact Steering Group Consumer Work Group HIE Committee Quick Links Blue Button Common Framework Health IT Health Library National Security Page Sections About National Security Post 9 11 Legacy Our Impact Task Force Quick Links National Security Library Reports and Recommendations Sharing and Collaboration The Lawfare Blog Library Quick Links Our Book America s Moment Archive Media Releases Member Commentary President s Letters Videos About Markle Page Sections About Markle A Message from Zoë Baird Our Principles Our Impact Board of Directors Senior Team Our History Quick Links Conference Space Events Markle in the News Media Releases Past Initiatives President s Letters Rework America Page Sections About Rework America A Message from Rework America Opportunity for All Our Impact Initiative Members Expert Advisors Quick Links Rework America Connected Our Book America s Moment Initiative Overview Latest News Letters to Members Member Commentary Personal Stories Rework America Library Health Page Sections About Health Our Impact Steering Group Consumer Work Group HIE Committee Quick Links Blue Button Common Framework Health IT Health Library National Security Page Sections About National Security Post 9 11 Legacy Our Impact Task Force Quick Links National Security Library Reports and Recommendations Sharing and Collaboration The Lawfare Blog Library Quick Links Our Book America s Moment Archive Media Releases Member Commentary President s Letters Videos Consumer Policy Markle Connecting for Health Common Framework for Networked Personal Health Information CP1 Policy Overview This document discusses the policy landscape in the context of emerging Consumer Access Services services or organizations seeking to help individuals make electronic connections across multiple sources of their health information CP2 Policy Notice to Consumers PHRs and Consumer Access Services must develop privacy policies terms and conditions of use and other relevant policies related to the handling of health information CP3 Consumer Consent to Collections Uses and Disclosures of Information By defining the bounds of what is permissible the process of asking for consent should be viewed as providing protection both to consumers and to other participants of a network CP4 Chain of Trust Agreements Consumers should be able to trust the entire chain of entities and business processes that handle their personal health data CP5 Notifications of Misuse of Branch Consumer Access Services should develop policies for breach or misuse of information and posted as part of the part of the publicly available notice of privacy and security policies CP6 Dispute Resolution Consumers should be provided with information to set realistic expectations about the service s practices for responding to complaints as well as let consumers know where else they might effectively address their concerns CP7 Discrimination and Compelled Disclosures This document recommends tough language to bar discrimination or compelled disclosures such as when the consumer s authorization for release of data is required in order to obtain employment benefits or other services CP8 Consumer Obtainment and Control Information Consumer obtainment and control are the core attributes of the copies of data that flow into and out of PHRs CP9 Enforcement

    Original URL path: http://www.markle.org/node/2331 (2016-02-10)
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  • Creating a Public Good for the Public's Health | Markle | Advancing America's Future
    to Members Member Commentary Personal Stories Rework America Library Health Page Sections About Health Our Impact Steering Group Consumer Work Group HIE Committee Quick Links Blue Button Common Framework Health IT Health Library National Security Page Sections About National Security Post 9 11 Legacy Our Impact Task Force Quick Links National Security Library Reports and Recommendations Sharing and Collaboration The Lawfare Blog Library Quick Links Our Book America s Moment Archive Media Releases Member Commentary President s Letters Videos About Markle Page Sections About Markle A Message from Zoë Baird Our Principles Our Impact Board of Directors Senior Team Our History Quick Links Conference Space Events Markle in the News Media Releases Past Initiatives President s Letters Rework America Page Sections About Rework America A Message from Rework America Opportunity for All Our Impact Initiative Members Expert Advisors Quick Links Rework America Connected Our Book America s Moment Initiative Overview Latest News Letters to Members Member Commentary Personal Stories Rework America Library Health Page Sections About Health Our Impact Steering Group Consumer Work Group HIE Committee Quick Links Blue Button Common Framework Health IT Health Library National Security Page Sections About National Security Post 9 11 Legacy Our Impact Task Force Quick Links National Security Library Reports and Recommendations Sharing and Collaboration The Lawfare Blog Library Quick Links Our Book America s Moment Archive Media Releases Member Commentary President s Letters Videos Creating a Public Good for the Public s Health Publication Date Saturday March 1 2008 Markle Connecting for Health presented this information at the Institute of Medicine to promote 21st century thinking for population data challenges The key goals of the presentation included the following Be open to resetting definitions and assumptions about health data and research approaches Articulate new broadly accepted working principles based on 21st century

    Original URL path: http://www.markle.org/publications/668-creating-public-good-publics-health (2016-02-10)
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  • Collaborative Response to AHRQ on Quality Data Stewardship | Markle | Advancing America's Future
    Library Health Page Sections About Health Our Impact Steering Group Consumer Work Group HIE Committee Quick Links Blue Button Common Framework Health IT Health Library National Security Page Sections About National Security Post 9 11 Legacy Our Impact Task Force Quick Links National Security Library Reports and Recommendations Sharing and Collaboration The Lawfare Blog Library Quick Links Our Book America s Moment Archive Media Releases Member Commentary President s Letters Videos About Markle Page Sections About Markle A Message from Zoë Baird Our Principles Our Impact Board of Directors Senior Team Our History Quick Links Conference Space Events Markle in the News Media Releases Past Initiatives President s Letters Rework America Page Sections About Rework America A Message from Rework America Opportunity for All Our Impact Initiative Members Expert Advisors Quick Links Rework America Connected Our Book America s Moment Initiative Overview Latest News Letters to Members Member Commentary Personal Stories Rework America Library Health Page Sections About Health Our Impact Steering Group Consumer Work Group HIE Committee Quick Links Blue Button Common Framework Health IT Health Library National Security Page Sections About National Security Post 9 11 Legacy Our Impact Task Force Quick Links National Security Library Reports and Recommendations Sharing and Collaboration The Lawfare Blog Library Quick Links Our Book America s Moment Archive Media Releases Member Commentary President s Letters Videos Collaborative Response to AHRQ on Quality Data Stewardship Publication Date Monday July 30 2007 Publication Source Markle We encourage AHRQ and AQA to develop systems for nationally uniform performance measurement with a humble recognition of our limited and evolving understanding of what information users will seek in order to make better decisions and of the many other activities that make use of similar data A robust policy and technology infrastructure will support all of these legitimate

    Original URL path: http://www.markle.org/publications/871-collaborative-response-ahrq-quality-data-stewardship (2016-02-10)
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  • A Framework for Informed, Intelligent and Safe Decision-Making for Health in the 21st Century | Markle | Advancing America's Future
    Commentary President s Letters Videos About Markle Page Sections About Markle A Message from Zoë Baird Our Principles Our Impact Board of Directors Senior Team Our History Quick Links Conference Space Events Markle in the News Media Releases Past Initiatives President s Letters Rework America Page Sections About Rework America A Message from Rework America Opportunity for All Our Impact Initiative Members Expert Advisors Quick Links Rework America Connected Our Book America s Moment Initiative Overview Latest News Letters to Members Member Commentary Personal Stories Rework America Library Health Page Sections About Health Our Impact Steering Group Consumer Work Group HIE Committee Quick Links Blue Button Common Framework Health IT Health Library National Security Page Sections About National Security Post 9 11 Legacy Our Impact Task Force Quick Links National Security Library Reports and Recommendations Sharing and Collaboration The Lawfare Blog Library Quick Links Our Book America s Moment Archive Media Releases Member Commentary President s Letters Videos A Framework for Informed Intelligent and Safe Decision Making for Health in the 21st Century Decision Making for Population Health First Principles Publication Date Thursday November 8 2007 Markle Connecting for Health has proposed a nationwide framework for a secure network of networks to enable the sharing of personal health information where and when it is needed for the care of individual patients This same environment must also support critical needs to evaluate and improve health care and the health of the general population In the 21st century the United States must have an information sharing environment that enables each person to generate knowledge and make better health and health care decisions by analyzing data from disparate sources This approach must be based on principles that support the efficient exchange of accurate information as well as the protection of individual privacy and

    Original URL path: http://www.markle.org/publications/1260-framework-informed-intelligent-and-safe-decision-making-health-21st-century (2016-02-10)
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  • Kean/Hamilton Testimony Reflects on Information Sharing Progress Since 9/11 | Markle | Advancing America's Future
    Members Member Commentary Personal Stories Rework America Library Health Page Sections About Health Our Impact Steering Group Consumer Work Group HIE Committee Quick Links Blue Button Common Framework Health IT Health Library National Security Page Sections About National Security Post 9 11 Legacy Our Impact Task Force Quick Links National Security Library Reports and Recommendations Sharing and Collaboration The Lawfare Blog Library Quick Links Our Book America s Moment Archive Media Releases Member Commentary President s Letters Videos About Markle Page Sections About Markle A Message from Zoë Baird Our Principles Our Impact Board of Directors Senior Team Our History Quick Links Conference Space Events Markle in the News Media Releases Past Initiatives President s Letters Rework America Page Sections About Rework America A Message from Rework America Opportunity for All Our Impact Initiative Members Expert Advisors Quick Links Rework America Connected Our Book America s Moment Initiative Overview Latest News Letters to Members Member Commentary Personal Stories Rework America Library Health Page Sections About Health Our Impact Steering Group Consumer Work Group HIE Committee Quick Links Blue Button Common Framework Health IT Health Library National Security Page Sections About National Security Post 9 11 Legacy Our Impact Task Force Quick Links National Security Library Reports and Recommendations Sharing and Collaboration The Lawfare Blog Library Quick Links Our Book America s Moment Archive Media Releases Member Commentary President s Letters Videos Kean Hamilton Testimony Reflects on Information Sharing Progress Since 9 11 In testimony before the Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee last week Thomas Kean and Lee Hamilton the former Chairmen of the 9 11 Commission discussed the progress and challenges in information sharing between and among government agencies since 9 11 Their comments resonate with Markle s recent written testimony submitted to the March 9 Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee hearing on Information Sharing in the Era of WikiLeaks In their testimony Kean and Hamilton stated We believe that information sharing has improved considerably in recent years There are now 105 Joint Terrorism Task Forces throughout the nation and 72 Fusion Centers in which federal state local and tribal authorities investigate terrorism leads and share information Since 2004 DHS has provided more than 340 million in funding to the Fusion Centers Information sharing with the private sector has also become routine and is an important part of our defenses While the mechanisms are in place for better information sharing the fact is that we missed opportunities to stop the Christmas Day bomber from boarding Northwest Flight 253 as well as opportunities to intervene before the Fort Hood shootings Clearly there is much room for improvement The 9 11 Commission Report based many of its information sharing recommendations on the reports of the Markle Task Force on National Security in the Information Age The 9 11 Commission also noted that Markle s reports had been widely discussed throughout the U S government but had not yet been converted into action Page 418 Now 10 years after 9

    Original URL path: http://www.markle.org/news-events/connected-world-blog/kean/hamilton-testimony-reflects-information-sharing-progress-9/11 (2016-02-10)
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  • Markle Task Force on National Security | Markle | Advancing America's Future
    America s Moment Initiative Overview Latest News Letters to Members Member Commentary Personal Stories Rework America Library Health Page Sections About Health Our Impact Steering Group Consumer Work Group HIE Committee Quick Links Blue Button Common Framework Health IT Health Library National Security Page Sections About National Security Post 9 11 Legacy Our Impact Task Force Quick Links National Security Library Reports and Recommendations Sharing and Collaboration The Lawfare Blog Library Quick Links Our Book America s Moment Archive Media Releases Member Commentary President s Letters Videos About Markle Page Sections About Markle A Message from Zoë Baird Our Principles Our Impact Board of Directors Senior Team Our History Quick Links Conference Space Events Markle in the News Media Releases Past Initiatives President s Letters Rework America Page Sections About Rework America A Message from Rework America Opportunity for All Our Impact Initiative Members Expert Advisors Quick Links Rework America Connected Our Book America s Moment Initiative Overview Latest News Letters to Members Member Commentary Personal Stories Rework America Library Health Page Sections About Health Our Impact Steering Group Consumer Work Group HIE Committee Quick Links Blue Button Common Framework Health IT Health Library National Security Page Sections About National Security Post 9 11 Legacy Our Impact Task Force Quick Links National Security Library Reports and Recommendations Sharing and Collaboration The Lawfare Blog Library Quick Links Our Book America s Moment Archive Media Releases Member Commentary President s Letters Videos Markle Task Force on National Security A Safer America through Information Sharing The terrorist attacks of September 11 2001 provided one unmistakable lesson those responsible for protecting us against today s threats must have the best information on those who want to do us harm Markle s national security work has focused on how to use information and information technology to improve national security while protecting traditional civil liberties The Markle Task Force on National Security in the Information Age formed the centerpiece of Markle s work About the Markle Task Force The Markle Task Force has been made up of a diverse and bipartisan group of national security experts from the past six presidential administrations senior information technology executives and privacy and civil liberties advocates It has been co chaired by Markle s president Zoë Baird Budinger and by former Netscape Chief Executive Officer Jim Barksdale In its reports the Markle Task Force has recommended ways to improve decisions affecting our national security by changing how government works transforming business and information sharing processes Many of the recommendations of the Markle Task Force have informed the 9 11 Commission Report and have been incorporated in executive orders and legislation including the Intelligence Reform and Terrorism Prevention Act of 2004 and the Protect America Act of 2007 The work of the Markle Task Force has broadened understanding of the importance of information and collaboration and of using information technology to prevent another terrorist attack The Markle Task Force has also helped advance protections for privacy and civil liberties by providing

    Original URL path: http://www.markle.org/national-security/markle-task-force-national-security (2016-02-10)
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  • Ten Years After 9/11: A Status Report on Information Sharing | Markle | Advancing America's Future
    Task Force Quick Links National Security Library Reports and Recommendations Sharing and Collaboration The Lawfare Blog Library Quick Links Our Book America s Moment Archive Media Releases Member Commentary President s Letters Videos About Markle Page Sections About Markle A Message from Zoë Baird Our Principles Our Impact Board of Directors Senior Team Our History Quick Links Conference Space Events Markle in the News Media Releases Past Initiatives President s Letters Rework America Page Sections About Rework America A Message from Rework America Opportunity for All Our Impact Initiative Members Expert Advisors Quick Links Rework America Connected Our Book America s Moment Initiative Overview Latest News Letters to Members Member Commentary Personal Stories Rework America Library Health Page Sections About Health Our Impact Steering Group Consumer Work Group HIE Committee Quick Links Blue Button Common Framework Health IT Health Library National Security Page Sections About National Security Post 9 11 Legacy Our Impact Task Force Quick Links National Security Library Reports and Recommendations Sharing and Collaboration The Lawfare Blog Library Quick Links Our Book America s Moment Archive Media Releases Member Commentary President s Letters Videos Ten Years After 9 11 A Status Report on Information Sharing Statement of Zoe Baird Budinger and Jeffrey H Smith to the Senate Committee on Homeland Security Governmental Affairs Publication Date Wednesday October 12 2011 On October 12 2011 the Senate Committee on Homeland Security Governmental Affairs held a hearing titled Ten Years After 9 11 A Status Report on Information Sharing Markle President Zoe Baird and Jeffrey H Smith of the Markle Task Force on National Security in the Information Age presented testimony on behalf of the Markle Task Force In the decade since the September 11 attacks our government has responded to the threat of terrorism by transforming itself in important ways

    Original URL path: http://www.markle.org/publications/1716-ten-years-after-911-status-report-information-sharing (2016-02-10)
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