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termination Markle Connecting for Health Collaborative Comments on the Proposed Rulemaking for Stage 2 Meaningful Use The release of two notices of proposed rulemaking on the incentive program for the Meaningful Use of electronic health record technology marks a major positive step forward in the nation s efforts to improve health and health care by putting modern information technology tools at the fingertips of medical professionals and consumers alike Markle Connecting for Health a public private collaborative applauds the U S Department of Health and Human Services for proposing an important set of regulations to improve health outcomes increase the cost effectiveness of care encourage innovation and protect privacy In this set of collaborative comments advanced by a diverse array of health leaders we offer our comments and recommendations on the proposed rules in four distinct categories Health goals and quality measures Patient engagement Care coordination Privacy and security New Policies in Practice from Markle Connecting for Health Address Challenges in Health Information Sharing Implementation NEW YORK Markle Connecting for Health today released a wide ranging compendium of resources designed to further support the interoperable private and secure sharing of health information The Markle Connecting for Health Common Framework Policies in Practice for Health Information Sharing or Polices in Practice address current critical implementation issues for electronic health information sharing including informed individual consent governance individual access and procurement A diverse group of leaders with expertise in health information sharing technology privacy and consumer engagement developed these Policies in Practice resources through a collaborative effort Markle President Zoë Baird Budinger explains The Markle Connecting for Health collaborative produced these resources to address some of the key issues and concerns that we have heard expressed by those implementing health information sharing efforts at the local state and regional levels We hope this supplement to our 2006 Markle Common Framework helps guide such efforts to foster the secure and trusted sharing of health information Markle Connecting for Health is a public private collaborative whose goal is to improve people s health and advance the quality of health care in the United States through innovations in information technology The Policies in Practice resources further specify the Markle Connecting for Health Common Framework for Private and Secure Health Information Exchange Markle Common Framework published in 2006 The Markle Common Framework offers a set of policy and technology guides based on Fair Information Practice Principles which when taken together offer a comprehensive framework to support trusted health information sharing Ted Kremer Executive Director Rochester RHIO and committee member involved in the development process says The foundational aspects of the Markle Common Framework were instrumental to our regional health information exchange formation and continue to be valuable However we and others realized it would be helpful to build on the Markle Common Framework and develop additional resources that apply directly to today s environment It was amazing to see the combined expertise that came together to address these issues and produce resources that are sure to be key to successful efforts going forward Today s health IT environment has evolved significantly from the environment in which the Markle Common Framework was first issued In addition to enactment of the HITECH Act there is a greater level of federal leadership new regulation and investment in IT and the use of health IT among providers is on the rise A 2010 Markle Survey on Health in a Networked Life comparing the core values of physicians and patients on deployment of IT in health care found that the majority of doctors prefer use of computers to paper and fax when sharing patient information with each other 1 The landscape for health information sharing is changing noted Laura Bailyn Senior Director Health Initiatives Markle As health information sharing needs and capabilities continue to evolve it is critical to incorporate new knowledge and lessons learned The Policies in Practice build on the foundational elements of the Markle Common Framework to provide additional support for implementers working in the field to make electronic health information sharing a reality Bailyn emphasized that the Policies in Practice are not intended to replace the original Markle Common Framework but to supplement it Each Policies in Practice resource aims to further specify the Markle Common Framework by addressing a targeted implementation need The Policies in Practice are not toolkits or stand alone solutions They should be considered together and used in context complying with all federal and state laws and regulations and in light of individualized operations and objectives The Policies in Practice address the following areas Key Laws and Regulations Changes Relevant to the Markle Common Framework Highlights modifications to relevant privacy laws over the last five years and addresses them in the targeted policy areas of the Markle Common Framework Consent Implementing the Individual Participation and Control Principle Provides context for implementing the privacy principle of Individual Participation and Control and suggests ways for health information sharing efforts to establish their own policies and best practices Individual Access Connecting Patients to Their Health Information Identifies and specifies opportunities for addressing individual access and engagement in relation to health information sharing Governance of Health Information Sharing Efforts Achieving Trust and Interoperability with Meaningful Consumer Participation Identifies and specifies opportunities for addressing individual access and engagement in relation to health information sharing Policy Aware Procurement Strategies and Practices Asking the Right Questions and Reaching the Right Answers Details important elements to apply in technology procurement efforts so that required policies are part of the acquisition and implementation of technology For more information please join us for a live webcast New Markle Resources for Implementing Health Information Sharing on Wednesday May 9 2012 11 00 am 12 30 pm ET Authors of the Policies in Practice and other experts will describe these resources including how they can be applied in today s environment and will answer viewer questions Contact Andrew Peters 301 280 5728 or email protected Markle Foundation The Public and Doctors Overwhelmingly Agree on Health IT Priorities to Improve Patient Care January 2011 http www markle org publications 1461 public and doctors overwhelmingly agree health it priorities improve patient care Live Webcast New Markle Resources for Implementing Health Information Sharing New Markle Resources for Implementing Health Information Sharing May 9 2012 Webcast Markle Connecting for Health A recording of the Live Webcast will be coming soon Responding to the needs of local state and regional health information sharing efforts Markle Connecting for Health has released the Markle Common Framework Policies in Practice for Health Information Sharing to support implementation Topics and speakers Panel 1 Background on the Policies in Practice Vicki Estrin C3 Consulting Key Laws and Regulations Changes Relevant to the Markle Common Framework Linda Malek Moses and Singer LLP Consent Implementing the Individual Participation and Control Principle in Health Information Sharing Deven McGraw Center for Democracy and Technology Questions and Answers Panel 2 Policy Aware Procurement Strategies and Practices Asking the Right Questions and Reaching the Right Answers Allen Briskin Pillsbury Winthrop Shaw Pittman LLP Governance of Health Information Sharing Efforts Achieving Trust and Interoperability with Meaningful Consumer Participation Stefaan Verhulst Markle Foundation Individual Access Connecting Patients with Their Health Information Laura Bailyn Markle Foundation How to Access the Policies in Practice on Markle org Questions and Answers Policies in Practice Overview Providing individuals access to their own information is well rooted in Fair Information Practice Principles FIPPs and a basic expectation for health IT Convenient access to one s own personal health information serves as a building block to helping people lead healthier lives and get higher quality more cost effective care The Markle Connecting for Health Common Framework for Networked Personal Health Information released in 2008 recommends practices that encourage appropriate handling of personal health information as it flows to and from electronic personal health records PHRs and similar applications or supporting services It is built upon a set of FIPPs based core principles that provide the foundation for managing personal health information within consumer accessible data streams The Markle Common Framework approach has been applied to create two bodies of work related to the following specific health information technology IT contexts The Markle Common Framework for Private and Secure Health Information Exchange released in 2006 The Markle Common Framework for Networked Personal Health Information released in 2008 Purpose Helps health information networks to share information among their members and nationwide while protecting privacy and allowing for local autonomy and innovation Purpose Recommends practices that encourage appropriate handling of personal health information as it flows to and from electronic PHRs and similar applications or supporting services Focus Specific to the context of the electronic exchange of patient information among health professionals and health care entities Focus Specific to the context of connecting individuals online to their own information such as via electronic PHRs or to other health related services and applications that use the individual s personal health information The Markle Connecting for Health Common Framework Policies in Practice for Networked Personal Health Information Policies in Practice is an addendum to the Markle Common Framework for Networked Personal Health Information The Policies in Practice were developed through a collaborative process by a diverse group of health care leaders with hands on experience implementing or using consumer access services including technology experts consumer representatives and health care providers The Policies in Practice address the following areas Policies in Practice The Download Capability Outlines the basic requirements for giving patients access to personal health information through a download capability Consumer Policy Brief Explores how Millie a fictitious 21st Century consumer would benefit under a Common Framework to help her obtain and control electronic copies of her personal health information and connect to health information services Consumer Technology Brief Outlines key messages of the technology resources of the Markle Common Framework Individual Access Connecting Patients with Their Health Information Identifies and specifies opportunities for addressing individual access and engagement in relation to health information sharing Frequently Asked Questions Provides answers to frequently asked questions about the Markle Connecting for Health Common Framework 2008 2012 Markle Foundation This work was originally published as part of a compendium called The Markle Connecting for Health Common Framework for Networked Personal Health Information It is made available free of charge but subject to the terms of a License You may make copies of this work however by copying or exercising any other rights to the work you accept and agree to be bound by the terms of the License All copies of this work must reproduce this copyright information and notice Policy and Technology Checklists for Procurers and Implementers The recommended policies and practices of the Markle Connecting for Health Common Framework for Networked Personal Health Information are designed to protect consumers and to guide services organizations applications or health information exchanges that collect store or share personal health information on the individual s behalf The Markle Common Framework for Networked Personal Health Information proposes a set of practices that when taken together encourage appropriate handling of personal health information as it flows to and from personal health records PHRs and similar applications or supporting services The Policy and Technology Checklists for Procurers and Implementers document derived from this framework provides recommended practices that may be used in requests for information RFI requests for proposals RFP procurement requirements or implementation checklists The policy practices include Protecting Consumer Data Through Chain of Trust Agreements Protecting Consumers with Timely Notification of Misuse or Breach Providing a Dispute Resolution Process Preventing Discrimination and Compelled Disclosures Providing Access to and Control of Information Writing Consumer friendly Policies Getting Consumer Consent The technology practices include Managing and Protecting the Individual s Identity Protecting Consumers by Giving Them Audit Trails Limiting the Exposure of Identifying Information Ensuring the Portability of Consumer Health Information Providing Strong Security and System Requirements Live Webcast New Markle Resources for Implementing Health Information Sharing Responding to the needs of local state and regional health information sharing efforts Markle Connecting for Health has released the Markle Common Framework Policies in Practice for Health Information Sharing to support implementation Based on the Markle Connecting for Health Common Framework for Private and Secure Health Information Exchange these Policies in Practice cover Topics and speakers Panel 1 Background on the Policies in Practice Vicki Estrin C3 Consulting Key Laws and Regulations Changes Relevant to the Markle Common Framework Linda Malek Moses and Singer LLP Consent Implementing the Individual Participation and Control Principle in Health Information Sharing Deven McGraw Center for Democracy and Technology Questions and Answers Panel 2 Policy Aware Procurement Strategies and Practices Asking the Right Questions and Reaching the Right Answers Allen Briskin Pillsbury Winthrop Shaw Pittman LLP Governance of Health Information Sharing Efforts Achieving Trust and Interoperability with Meaningful Consumer Participation Stefaan Verhulst Markle Foundation Individual Access Connecting Patients with Their Health Information Laura Bailyn Markle Foundation How to Access the Policies in Practice on Markle org Questions and Answers FAQs The document you are reading is part of the Markle Connecting for Health Common Framework for Private and Secure Health Information Exchange Markle Common Framework The Markle Common Framework includes a set of foundational policy and technology guides published in 2006 In April 2012 a set of Policies in Practice was published to further specify these foundational documents and address a range of critical health information sharing implementation needs identified by experts working in the field Contents How does the Markle Common Framework apply Fair Information Practice Principles How does the Markle Common Framework support population health activities Does the Markle Common Framework address the sustainability of health information sharing efforts What is the Markle Common Framework s network approach How has the landscape changed since release of the Markle Common Framework How does the Markle Common Framework align with state and federal efforts How does the Markle Common Framework for Private and Secure Health Information Exchange relate to the Markle Common Framework for Networked Personal Health Information Appendix A The following are answers to frequently asked questions about the Markle Connecting for Health Common Framework for Private and Secure Health Information Exchange Markle Common Framework How does the Markle Common Framework apply Fair Information Practice Principles Information sharing depends on trusting relationships among entities and institutions not machines Our experience suggests that any health information sharing effort1 must adopt a framework of trust and then translate it into practice by specifying the policies practices and technology choices necessary for implementation The specific policies and practices of the Markle Common Framework benefited greatly from their grounding in nine policy principles from the U S Fair Information Practice Principles FIPPs 2 and the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development s OECD Guidelines Governing the Protection of Privacy and Transborder Flows of Personal Data 3 In the U S FIPPs have been recognized for decades at the state and national levels Recently both the Commerce Department and the Federal Trade Commission have recognized FIPPs as important foundational elements of a nationwide privacy framework to address privacy in a digital age 4 5 Based on FIPPs the Markle Common Framework policy principles include openness and transparency purpose specification collection limitation and minimization use limitation individual participation and control data integrity and quality security safeguards and controls accountability and oversight and remedies 6 No single principle is adequate on its own Meaningful safeguards are achieved by applying these principles together applying some and not others can weaken the overall approach In Appendix A we provide tables that identify how the Markle Common Framework Policy and Technology Guides and the Policies in Practice address each of the core policy and technology principles Back to top How does the Markle Common Framework support population health activities As health information becomes increasingly networked opportunities are growing to support health and health care not only for individuals but for entire populations as well Aggregation and analysis of population level data can address important research questions related to quality clinical effectiveness public health and safety The Markle Connecting for Health First Principles for Population Health Data Sharing and Decision Making apply the key attributes of the Markle Common Framework to population health initiatives The First Principles emphasize a distributed network of networks approach where data on individual patients remain with local data holders while only summarized anonymous data are aggregated for large scale analysis The First Principles outline an initial set of policy and technical principles to enable broad scale information sharing while protecting individual patient privacy Some technical challenges need to be addressed to allow for broad scale implementation of this model For example it is difficult to find and delete duplicate anonymized records that may be counted unintentionally in multiple summary statistics However there is promising research in the area of distributed models as well as compelling examples of successful models that address a range of population health questions 7 8 Due to the enormous potential for societal benefit further research and development is warranted Back to top Does the Markle Common Framework address the sustainability of health information sharing efforts The Markle Common Framework is rooted in the premise that sustainability cannot be achieved unless efforts are grounded in clear and explicit health goals and improvements in health care quality and cost effectiveness are valued and supported 9 Although federal spending under the Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health HITECH Act of the American Recovery and Recovery Act of 2009 ARRA has resulted in an unprecedented level of federal funding to foster the application of health IT and health information sharing long term sustainability will depend on aligning improvements in health care quality and cost effectiveness with financial and non financial incentives In addition the private sector needs to demonstrate clear and substantial support for these types of improvements in order to sustain health information sharing A true return on investment can only be realized when this happens Back to top What is the Markle Common Framework s network approach The Markle Common Framework offers an approach to information sharing that is predicated on a network of networks like the Internet and designed to enable health information sharing with a policy and technology framework that promotes innovation and protects privacy The Markle Common Framework is built on the assumption that all health information sharing decisions are best made between the patient and the provider with whom the patient has a relationship The network of networks design is distributed allowing information to be kept at its source and transmitted when authorized to appropriate recipients In this model patients and the doctors they trust can decide with whom to share personal health information and for what purposes Finding the location of a patient s health information is described in the Markle Common Framework using an index called the Record Locator Service RLS that points users to the authorized records they are requesting The RLS does not contain actual clinical data or clinical metadata After identifying where the clinical information is stored each provider holding records has the discretion to disclose those records depending on the decisions the providers have made with their patients Transfers of health information may then be accomplished via fax or secure e mail or by secure computer to computer transfers over the Internet depending on the level of information sharing available Providers and sources that routinely collaborate may exchange data automatically and electronically Thus there are two decisions to be made locally whether to index and whether to share This two step process helps ensure that the system does not increase exposure of personal health information while making record location fast and efficient even in environments where electronic records are not fully available Additional information on the RLS can be found in T1 The Markle Common Framework Technical Issues and Requirements for Implementation As reflected in the Markle Common Framework policies must be crafted in parallel with the design and deployment of technology and in an ongoing manner Both policy and technology evolve with new information sharing needs and objectives and therefore will remain important objectives Back to top How has the landscape changed since release of the Markle Common Framework The health information sharing landscape has changed dramatically since release of the Markle Common Framework in 2006 Over recent years the level of federal leadership new regulation and public investment around health information sharing have increased substantially In addition use of health IT has grown among providers and individuals alike Early efforts to establish an infrastructure for health information sharing were bolstered in 2004 through an Executive Order which established the Department of Health and Human Services HHS Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology ONC and made possible efforts for standards harmonization use case development and the certification of electronic health record EHR products By 2006 the health care sector was struggling to overcome challenges of policy technology and capital investment to advance health information sharing Adoption of health IT in clinical settings was weak In 2006 only 29 2 percent of physicians reported any electronic medical record EMR or EHR in their office based practice 10 An EMR EHR is a medical or health record system that is either all or partially electronic excluding systems solely for billing That same year 26 health information exchanges HIEs reported being operational and transmitting data for use by their health care stakeholders 11 Enactment of the HITECH Act in February 2009 marked a new level of federal leadership regulation and investment for health information sharing Aiming to address many of the challenges facing the health care sector the HITECH Act codified into law the U S Department of Health and Human Services HHS Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology ONC established federal advisory committees to advise ONC on policy and standards decisions invested in state HIE set forth an EHR incentives program for Medicare and Medicaid providers established new initiatives to support the education and training of the health IT workforce modified particular aspects of the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 HIPAA and established new programs to foster individual engagement with health IT On the heels of the HITECH Act broad scale health care reform legislation the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2009 ACA was enacted Aspects of ACA aim to further leverage health IT in efforts to transform health care For example it calls for the creation of a Shared Savings Program to deliver seamless high quality care for Medicare beneficiaries through Accountable Care Organizations ACOs which must apply health IT in order to meet care coordination requirements Recent investments have recognized health IT and health information sharing as critical to improving the quality and efficiency of health care in the U S as reflected by rising adoption rates Preliminary data indicate that 43 9 percent of physicians reported any EMR EHR in their office based practice in 2009 12 By 2011 85 HIEs were reported to be operational 13 A recent Markle Survey on Health in a Networked Life uniquely compares the core values of physicians and patients on deployment of IT in health care Seventy four percent of doctors surveyed said that they would prefer computer based means electronic networks secure email or portable storage devices to paper and fax when sharing patient information with each other Up to 74 percent of doctors agreed that patients should be able to share information with their doctors electronically At least 59 percent of the public agreed with this statement The survey results also indicate that personal health record PHR adoption is on the rise with 10 percent of the surveyed public reporting having a PHR in 2010 compared to 3 percent in 2008 14 Back to top How does the Markle Common Framework align with state and federal efforts Since its release in 2006 health information sharing efforts have used the Markle Common Framework to develop architecture specifications and policies for the private and secure sharing of health information Many states cite the Markle Common Framework in their operational and strategic plans to ONC as part of the State HIE Cooperative Agreement Program States also refer to the Markle Common Framework in their online policy and technology materials 15 The Markle Common Framework is also closely aligned with federal policy efforts For example the EHR incentive program reflects many elements of the Markle Common Framework setting forth minimum necessary standards to allow for flexibility and innovation within the marketplace as well as requiring the submission of aggregate quality data to minimize risk of exposing patient data 16 17 In the area of population health ONC recently announced new efforts to explore and further the application of distributed networks 18 The important role of foundational principles policies and practices like those of the Markle Common Framework in supporting the trusted sharing of health information is recognized by the federal government For example in March 2012 ONC released a Program Information Notice titled Privacy and Security Framework Requirements and Guidance for the State Health Information Exchange Cooperative Agreement Program that builds upon the Nationwide Privacy and Security Framework for Electronic Exchange of Individually Identifiable Health Information and sets forth guidance centered on FIPPs based principles for states to apply in developing their privacy and security policies and practices In addition the Health IT Task Force a joint initiative of the ONC and Office of Management and Budget called for select federal agencies to coordinate health IT investments around a shared set of policy and technology principles to maximize the benefits of health IT In September 2010 Vivek Kundra the Federal Chief Information Officer and David Blumenthal the National Coordinator for Health IT articulated a set of policy and technology principles for agencies to use as a guide in planning for and using health IT investments that emphasized five principles Improve health and health care Promote open government and provide patients with a secure timely electronic copy of their own information Share health information between providers Protect privacy and security aligning with FIPPs and Use a distributed data architecture versus centralized data warehouses 19 Back to top How does the Markle Common Framework for Private and Secure Health Information Exchange relate to the Markle Common Framework for Networked Personal Health Information The Markle Common Framework approach based on Fair Information Practice Principles FIPPs has been applied to create two bodies of work These two frameworks share the same foundational attributes and principles The variation in the frameworks is how these principles are specifically applied in two different information sharing contexts as outlined below The Markle Common Framework for Private and Secure Health Information Exchange released in 2006 The Markle Common Framework for Networked Personal Health Information released in 2008 Purpose Helps health information networks to share information among their members and nationwide while protecting privacy and allowing for local autonomy and innovation Purpose Recommends practices that encourage appropriate handling of personal health information as it flows to and from electronic PHRs and similar applications or supporting services Focus Specific to the context of the electronic exchange of patient information among health professionals and health care entities Focus Specific to the context of connecting individuals online to their own information such as via electronic PHRs or to other health related services and applications that use the individual s personal health information Back to top Appendix A Each of the Policies in Practice and the Policy and Technology Guides of the Markle Common Framework for Private and Secure Health Information Exchange Markle Common Framework addresses a subset of relevant core policy and technology principles The tables in this Appendix identify each resource and its corresponding core policy and technology principles Markle Connecting for Health Core Policy Principles Markle Connecting for Health has published a set of policy principles that provide the foundation for privacy and health information technology IT in a networked environment The Markle Connecting for Health approach dictates that these nine principles be balanced together and considered as part of one package Elevating certain principles over others would weaken any overall architectural solution to privacy protection in a networked health information environment In brief the principles and the corresponding resources are as follows CORE TECHNOLOGY PRINCIPLES MARKLE COMMON FRAMEWORK PRACTICE AREAS POLICIES IN PRACTICE 1 Openness and transparency There should be a general policy of openness about developments practices and policies with respect to personal data Individuals should be able to know what information exists about them the purpose of its use who can access and use it and where it resides P1 The Architecture for Privacy in a Networked Health Information Environment P2 Model Privacy Policies and Procedures for Health Information Exchange P3 Notification and Consent When Using a Record Locator Service P4 Correctly Matching Patients with Their Records P6 Patients Access to Their Own Health Information P7 Auditing Access to and Use of a Health Information Exchange P8 Breaches of Confidential Health Information P9 A Common Framework for Networked Personal Health Information Consent Implementing the Individual Participation and Control Principle in Health Information Sharing Policy Aware Procurement Strategies and Practices Asking the Right Questions Reaching the Right Answers Mechanisms for Oversight Accountability and Enforcement The Model Contract Update and More Governance of Health Information Sharing Efforts Achieving Trust and Interoperability with Meaningful Consumer Participation Individual Access Connecting Patients with Their Health Information 2 Purpose specification The purposes for which personal data are collected should be specified at the time of collection and the subsequent use should be limited to those purposes or others that are specified on each occasion of change of purpose P1 The Architecture for Privacy in a Networked Health Information Environment P2 Model Privacy Policies and Procedures for Health Information Exchange P3 Notification and Consent When Using a Record Locator Service P4 Correctly Matching Patients with Their Records Consent Implementing the Individual Participation and Control Principle in Health

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  • Homepage News Events | Markle | Advancing America's Future
    Zoë Baird Our Principles Our Impact Board of Directors Senior Team Our History Quick Links Conference Space Events Markle in the News Media Releases Past Initiatives President s Letters Rework America Page Sections About Rework America A Message from Rework America Opportunity for All Our Impact Initiative Members Expert Advisors Quick Links Rework America Connected Our Book America s Moment Initiative Overview Latest News Letters to Members Member Commentary Personal Stories Rework America Library Health Page Sections About Health Our Impact Steering Group Consumer Work Group HIE Committee Quick Links Blue Button Common Framework Health IT Health Library National Security Page Sections About National Security Post 9 11 Legacy Our Impact Task Force Quick Links National Security Library Reports and Recommendations Sharing and Collaboration The Lawfare Blog Library Quick Links Our Book America s Moment Archive Media Releases Member Commentary President s Letters Videos News Events Leading Health Care and Information Technology Groups Endorse Common Framework for Health Information Exchange to Support Improvements in Health and Healthcare Department of Health and Human Services Actions Advance Goal of Electronic Health Information Infrastructure Connecting for Health Recommends Specific Actions for Bringing Healthcare into the Information Age Connecting for Health Report Analyzes Business Case for Adoption of Health IT Systems Technology Companies Providers Health Insurers and Consumer Groups Agree on Framework for Increasing Privacy and Consumer Control Over Personal Health Records Health IT Investments Should Enable People to Download Their Own Information at the Click of a Blue Button With support from 50 organizations Markle Connecting for Health recommends specific privacy practices for blue button access to EHRs New Markle Survey Finds US Public and Doctors Alike Support Blue Button for Downloading Health Information Both the US public and doctors overwhelmingly agree that people should be able to go online to download copies

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    Exchange Model Contractual Language Markle Common Framework for Private and Secure Health Information Exchange Technology Guides Markle Common Framework for Private and Secure Health Information Exchange Technology Guides Markle Common Framework for Private and Secure Health Information Exchange Policy Guides Markle Common Framework for Private and Secure Health Information Exchange David Kirkpatrick David Kirkpatrick is a journalist and well known commentator about technology He is the founder host and CEO of Techonomy the annual conference about the centrality of technology to business and social progress and the urgency of embracing the rapid pace of change brought by technology He is also a writer for the Daily Beast and Vanity Fair He appears frequently on television radio and the Internet as an expert on technology For many years Mr Kirkpatrick was the senior editor for internet and technology at Fortune magazine While at Fortune he wrote cover stories about Apple IBM Intel Microsoft Sun and numerous other technology subjects Beginning in 2001 he created Fortune s Brainstorm conference series He is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations and of the World Economic Forum s International Media Council consisting of 100 of global media leaders Mr Kirkpatrick is the author of the best selling book on the history and explanation of Facebook The Facebook Effect The Inside Story of the Company that is Connecting the World which was published by Simon Schuster in 2011 Committee for Economic Development Fall Policy Conference Zoë Baird President of the Markle Foundation will participate in a panel discussion at the Fall Policy Conference hosted by the Committee for Economic Development Moderated by Steve Clemons Editor in Chief AtlanticLIVE the panel also includes Martin Baily Senior Fellow Economic Studies Program and the Bernard L Schwartz Chair in Economic Policy Development The Brookings Institution Robert Hormats Former Undersecretary of State Economic Growth Energy and The Environment U S State Department Carla Hills Co Chairman Chairman and CEO Hills Company International Consultants Lisa MacSpadden Lisa MacSpadden is the Managing Director and Chief Communications Officer at Markle She oversees public and media outreach to advance the organization s work to leverage technology and globalization as positive forces of change and to create opportunities for all Americans in the digital economy Prior to joining Markle she served in the administration of New York Governor Andrew M Cuomo first as Deputy Secretary of State for Communications and Community Affairs at the New York Department of State and then as the Director of Media Relations at The Port Authority of New York and New Jersey where she provided press and public policy counsel on a wide range of issues Before relocating to New York MacSpadden was the Director of Public and Media Engagement at the National Capital Planning Commission in Washington DC where she also represented the agency as its international liaison with senior policy and planning officials from around the globe Earlier government service in Washington included serving as the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Public Affairs and then as the

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  • Flying Blind | Markle | Advancing America's Future
    Collaboration The Lawfare Blog Library Quick Links Our Book America s Moment Archive Media Releases Member Commentary President s Letters Videos About Markle Page Sections About Markle A Message from Zoë Baird Our Principles Our Impact Board of Directors Senior Team Our History Quick Links Conference Space Events Markle in the News Media Releases Past Initiatives President s Letters Rework America Page Sections About Rework America A Message from Rework America Opportunity for All Our Impact Initiative Members Expert Advisors Quick Links Rework America Connected Our Book America s Moment Initiative Overview Latest News Letters to Members Member Commentary Personal Stories Rework America Library Health Page Sections About Health Our Impact Steering Group Consumer Work Group HIE Committee Quick Links Blue Button Common Framework Health IT Health Library National Security Page Sections About National Security Post 9 11 Legacy Our Impact Task Force Quick Links National Security Library Reports and Recommendations Sharing and Collaboration The Lawfare Blog Library Quick Links Our Book America s Moment Archive Media Releases Member Commentary President s Letters Videos Flying Blind Dr JT Finnell of Indianapolis Indiana Publication Date Thursday July 1 2004 The patient came into Indianapolis Wishard Memorial Hospital complaining of crushing chest pain but was unable to give ER doctors his medical history Based on his symptoms my colleagues feared he was having heart trouble possibly a heart attack In these situations ER physicians typically give patients blood thinners as the medicine allows blood to restore the injured area of the heart That didn t happen in this case And it s a good thing Fortunately the attending physicians were able to electronically access the man s medical records instantaneously informing them that the man with chest pain sought treatment from a nearby hospital just three weeks prior for a head injury

    Original URL path: http://www.markle.org/health/flying-blind (2016-02-10)
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  • Privacy Implications of the Federal Government's Health Information Technology Initiative | Markle | Advancing America's Future
    Work Group HIE Committee Quick Links Blue Button Common Framework Health IT Health Library National Security Page Sections About National Security Post 9 11 Legacy Our Impact Task Force Quick Links National Security Library Reports and Recommendations Sharing and Collaboration The Lawfare Blog Library Quick Links Our Book America s Moment Archive Media Releases Member Commentary President s Letters Videos About Markle Page Sections About Markle A Message from Zoë Baird Our Principles Our Impact Board of Directors Senior Team Our History Quick Links Conference Space Events Markle in the News Media Releases Past Initiatives President s Letters Rework America Page Sections About Rework America A Message from Rework America Opportunity for All Our Impact Initiative Members Expert Advisors Quick Links Rework America Connected Our Book America s Moment Initiative Overview Latest News Letters to Members Member Commentary Personal Stories Rework America Library Health Page Sections About Health Our Impact Steering Group Consumer Work Group HIE Committee Quick Links Blue Button Common Framework Health IT Health Library National Security Page Sections About National Security Post 9 11 Legacy Our Impact Task Force Quick Links National Security Library Reports and Recommendations Sharing and Collaboration The Lawfare Blog Library Quick Links Our Book America s Moment Archive Media Releases Member Commentary President s Letters Videos Privacy Implications of the Federal Government s Health Information Technology Initiative U S Senate Testimony of Carol C Diamond Publication Date Thursday February 1 2007 First the nation needs a well defined comprehensive privacy framework based on key policy and technology attributes that I will lay out Second while the entities and contracts created by HHS have been useful to initiate action in this field we now need to find the appropriate longer term process for determining both the policies and the technologies that will achieve the

    Original URL path: http://www.markle.org/publications/954-privacy-implications-federal-governments-health-information-technology-initiative (2016-02-10)
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  • Americans Want Benefits of Personal Health Records | Markle | Advancing America's Future
    Commentary Personal Stories Rework America Library Health Page Sections About Health Our Impact Steering Group Consumer Work Group HIE Committee Quick Links Blue Button Common Framework Health IT Health Library National Security Page Sections About National Security Post 9 11 Legacy Our Impact Task Force Quick Links National Security Library Reports and Recommendations Sharing and Collaboration The Lawfare Blog Library Quick Links Our Book America s Moment Archive Media Releases Member Commentary President s Letters Videos About Markle Page Sections About Markle A Message from Zoë Baird Our Principles Our Impact Board of Directors Senior Team Our History Quick Links Conference Space Events Markle in the News Media Releases Past Initiatives President s Letters Rework America Page Sections About Rework America A Message from Rework America Opportunity for All Our Impact Initiative Members Expert Advisors Quick Links Rework America Connected Our Book America s Moment Initiative Overview Latest News Letters to Members Member Commentary Personal Stories Rework America Library Health Page Sections About Health Our Impact Steering Group Consumer Work Group HIE Committee Quick Links Blue Button Common Framework Health IT Health Library National Security Page Sections About National Security Post 9 11 Legacy Our Impact Task Force Quick Links National Security Library Reports and Recommendations Sharing and Collaboration The Lawfare Blog Library Quick Links Our Book America s Moment Archive Media Releases Member Commentary President s Letters Videos Americans Want Benefits of Personal Health Records Publication Date Thursday June 5 2003 Over 70 percent of those surveyed believe PHRs would improve the quality of health care Over two thirds would use PHR features that are or may be available People with greater health care needs report the highest interest in using PHRs In addition people trust their doctors the most with authorized access to their PHR Finally nearly all

    Original URL path: http://www.markle.org/publications/950-americans-want-benefits-personal-health-records (2016-02-10)
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  • Engaging Americans in their Health and their Health Care through Health IT | Markle | Advancing America's Future
    Health IT Health Library National Security Page Sections About National Security Post 9 11 Legacy Our Impact Task Force Quick Links National Security Library Reports and Recommendations Sharing and Collaboration The Lawfare Blog Library Quick Links Our Book America s Moment Archive Media Releases Member Commentary President s Letters Videos About Markle Page Sections About Markle A Message from Zoë Baird Our Principles Our Impact Board of Directors Senior Team Our History Quick Links Conference Space Events Markle in the News Media Releases Past Initiatives President s Letters Rework America Page Sections About Rework America A Message from Rework America Opportunity for All Our Impact Initiative Members Expert Advisors Quick Links Rework America Connected Our Book America s Moment Initiative Overview Latest News Letters to Members Member Commentary Personal Stories Rework America Library Health Page Sections About Health Our Impact Steering Group Consumer Work Group HIE Committee Quick Links Blue Button Common Framework Health IT Health Library National Security Page Sections About National Security Post 9 11 Legacy Our Impact Task Force Quick Links National Security Library Reports and Recommendations Sharing and Collaboration The Lawfare Blog Library Quick Links Our Book America s Moment Archive Media Releases Member Commentary President s Letters Videos Engaging Americans in their Health and their Health Care through Health IT Prepared statement by Carol C Diamond MD MPH Managing Director Markle Foundation chair Connecting for Health Publication Date Thursday September 29 2005 Chairman Davis and distinguished members of the Committee on Government Reform thank you for inviting me to meet with you today Attention Has Intensified In the last few years public and private sector awareness of the need for information technology in health care has intensified dramatically Prominent government activities include the President s call for the creation of electronic health records for all Americans numerous legislative bills implementation of many agency pilots and programs the activities of the Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology and most recently the establishment by Secretary Leavitt of the AHIC These efforts represent a broad commitment to bring about change But all this is merely prelude We continue to lack an information infrastructure that supports safe efficient evidence based medical care Even the best trained best equipped and best intentioned American health professional cannot provide high quality care in an information vacuum No research study or pilot program better highlights this point than the reality of Hurricane Katrina As you know hundreds of thousands of residents of areas hit by the hurricane were displaced from their homes and most are still living in shelters or temporary housing across the United States Neither the evacuees nor their current health care providers have access to their paper medical records many of which were destroyed by the hurricane A survey by the Kaiser Family Foundation and the Washington Post estimated that 40 percent of evacuees were taking prescription medications before the storm hit and many more need new or additional medications now Many of their medical records can

    Original URL path: http://www.markle.org/publications/946-engaging-americans-their-health-and-their-health-care-through-health-it (2016-02-10)
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  • Health Information Technology: Improving Quality and Value of Patient Care | Markle | Advancing America's Future
    Work Group HIE Committee Quick Links Blue Button Common Framework Health IT Health Library National Security Page Sections About National Security Post 9 11 Legacy Our Impact Task Force Quick Links National Security Library Reports and Recommendations Sharing and Collaboration The Lawfare Blog Library Quick Links Our Book America s Moment Archive Media Releases Member Commentary President s Letters Videos About Markle Page Sections About Markle A Message from Zoë Baird Our Principles Our Impact Board of Directors Senior Team Our History Quick Links Conference Space Events Markle in the News Media Releases Past Initiatives President s Letters Rework America Page Sections About Rework America A Message from Rework America Opportunity for All Our Impact Initiative Members Expert Advisors Quick Links Rework America Connected Our Book America s Moment Initiative Overview Latest News Letters to Members Member Commentary Personal Stories Rework America Library Health Page Sections About Health Our Impact Steering Group Consumer Work Group HIE Committee Quick Links Blue Button Common Framework Health IT Health Library National Security Page Sections About National Security Post 9 11 Legacy Our Impact Task Force Quick Links National Security Library Reports and Recommendations Sharing and Collaboration The Lawfare Blog Library Quick Links Our Book America s Moment Archive Media Releases Member Commentary President s Letters Videos Health Information Technology Improving Quality and Value of Patient Care Testimony Before the Committee on Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Health U S House of Representatives Publication Date Thursday July 22 2004 While we do not offer a prescription for which innovations in care will be most effective in improving healthcare quality or reducing medical error we do know that most of them cannot be realized without the rapid accurate and secure exchange of personal health information among authorized users And we believe that the greatest improvements

    Original URL path: http://www.markle.org/publications/945-health-information-technology-improving-quality-and-value-patient-care (2016-02-10)
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