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  • Massachusetts North American Amphibian Program
    their habitats There are a number of ways that you can help Contribute new amphibian and reptile records to the Herp Atlas project http www massherpatlas org data collection index html Become a volunteer monitor for the North American Amphibian Monitoring Program In Massachusetts http www massnaamp org Elsewhere in the U S http www pwrc usgs gov NAAMP Document amphibian roadway crossings http linkinglandscapes info roads salamander map html

    Original URL path: http://www.massherpatlas.org/how_to_help/index.html (2016-02-01)
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  • Massachusetts North American Amphibian Program
    the original intensive volunteer survey that took place from 1992 1998 Download pdf of map Updated Distribution Map View interactive map showing an updated distribution based all records received to date including sightings submitted via this site Report your own sighting Lithobates catesbieanus Our largest frog the bullfrog has a voice to match both its size and its name Heard individually it is easy to detect the familiar chug o

    Original URL path: http://www.massherpatlas.org/amphibians_reptiles/frogs_toads/bullfrog/index.html (2016-02-01)
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  • Massachusetts North American Amphibian Program
    Red backed Salamander Back to Amphibians Reptiles index Distribution Map Information Photos Herp Atlas 1992 1998 Survey The map below shows the distribution of the Red backed Salamander in Massachusetts based on the original intensive volunteer survey that took place from 1992 1998 Download pdf of map Updated Distribution Map View interactive map showing an updated distribution based all records received to date including sightings submitted via this site Report

    Original URL path: http://www.massherpatlas.org/amphibians_reptiles/salamanders/redback_salamander/index.html (2016-02-01)
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  • Massachusetts North American Amphibian Program
    Updated Distribution Map View interactive map showing an updated distribution based all records received to date including sightings submitted via this site Report your own sighting Thamnophis s sauritus 18 26 up to 38 The ribbon snake is a very slender striped snake similar in appearance to the garter snake but with a much longer tail Tail length for the ribbon snake generally accounts for one third or more of total body length It is boldly patterned with three yellow stripes on a reddish brown background A distinct dark band separates each side stripe from the belly The ribbon snake has keeled scales and a belly that is pale yellow or pale green Ribbon snakes generally mate in the spring April May after emerging from hibernation and females give birth to 10 12 young in July or August The preferred habitats of ribbon snakes are wetlands and the edges of ponds and streams Amphibians especially frogs are their preferred food although fish and insects are also taken Given their preference for wet habitats ribbon snakes tend to be most active during the spring If summer weather dries up their environment they may become dormant until conditions improve Ribbon snakes are

    Original URL path: http://www.massherpatlas.org/amphibians_reptiles/snakes/ribbon/index.html (2016-02-01)
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  • Massachusetts North American Amphibian Program
    covered with pale yellow flecking The lower shell plastron is yellow with large black blotches on the outer posterior corner of each scute scale The plastron is hinged allowing movement however the shell does not close tightly In older individuals the entire plastron may be black The most distinguishing feature is its long yellow throat and chin which makes it recognizable at a distance Males have slightly concave plastrons females have flat plastrons The tails of males are thicker and their cloacal opening the common orifice of the digestive reproductive and urinary systems is located beyond the edge of the carapace Hatchlings have a brown carapace and brown to black plastron and range between 1 3 and 1 5 inches in length Blanding s Turtles use a variety of wetland and terrestrial habitat types They overwinter in organic substrate in the deepest parts of marshes ponds and occasionally vernal pools Some individuals overwinter under hummocks in red maple or highbush blueberry swamps Upon emergence from overwintering Blanding s Turtles often leave permanent wetlands and move overland to vernal pools and scrub shrub swamps where they feed and mate During the summer months females aestivate dormancy or reduced activity during the summer in upland forest or along forest field edges Blanding s Turtles are omnivores eating both plants and animals The animals Blanding s Turtles are known to eat either alive or as carrion consist of Pulmonate snails crayfish earthworms insects golden shiners brown bullheads and other small vertebrates Vernal pools are an important source of many of these prey items The plants that Blanding s Turtles have been known to eat include coontail duckweed bulrush and sedge Courtship and mating takes place during the spring and early summer and typically occurs in water Females will remain in wetland or vernal

    Original URL path: http://www.massherpatlas.org/amphibians_reptiles/turtles/blanding_turtle/index.html (2016-02-01)
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  • Massachusetts North American Amphibian Program
    original intensive volunteer survey that took place from 1992 1998 Download pdf of map Updated Distribution Map View interactive map showing an updated distribution based all records received to date including sightings submitted via this site Report your own sighting Anaxyrus americanus The American toad is the common hop toad of back yards and gardens It s warty ungraceful appearance belies a quite beautiful voice that is typically heard in

    Original URL path: http://www.massherpatlas.org/amphibians_reptiles/frogs_toads/american_toad/index.html (2016-02-01)
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  • Massachusetts North American Amphibian Program
    Four toed Salamander Back to Amphibians Reptiles index Distribution Map Information Photos Herp Atlas 1992 1998 Survey The map below shows the distribution of the Four toed Salamander in Massachusetts based on the original intensive volunteer survey that took place from 1992 1998 Download pdf of map Updated Distribution Map View interactive map showing an updated distribution based all records received to date including sightings submitted via this site Report

    Original URL path: http://www.massherpatlas.org/amphibians_reptiles/salamanders/four_toed_salamander/index.html (2016-02-01)
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  • Massachusetts North American Amphibian Program
    distribution based all records received to date including sightings submitted via this site Report your own sighting Agkistrodon contortrix 24 36 up to 53 MA Status Endangered Illegal to harass kill collect or possess The copperhead is a venomous snake with a broad triangular head vertically elliptical pupils and a heat sensitive pit between each eye and nostril The body is pinkish to grayish brown with brown or reddish brown crossbands that are narrow on the back and widest on the sides Small dark spots commonly occur between crossbands on the back The unpatterned head is dull orange copper or rusty red Body scales are keeled and the belly is pink or light brown with dark blotches along the sides When young a copperhead has a yellow tipped tail Mating takes place in spring and fall and females give birth to 4 8 young in August and September Adult females usually give birth every two years Copperheads prefer rocky forested hillsides and wetlands for habitat Wet areas are particularly sought out in the hot summer months Small mammals and frogs account for most of the prey items taken but birds insects and other snakes are also important parts of their

    Original URL path: http://www.massherpatlas.org/amphibians_reptiles/snakes/copperhead/index.html (2016-02-01)
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