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  • Massachusetts North American Amphibian Program
    colored turtle with a long neck covered with many small tubercles bumps and narrowly spaced eyes Snappers have a flat carapace upper shell that is ridged with radiation lines in young animals but typically worn smooth in older adults The carapace is distinctly serrated at the back near the tail The plastron lower shell is small and cross shaped As a result snapping turtles cannot withdraw within their shell for protection To compensate they have long necks and use their powerful beaks to snap at potential predators The tail is as long or longer than the carapace and contains three rows of large tubercles running down its length Hatchlings are typically a little more than an inch in length with very distinct ridges and tubercles and long tails Snapping turtles are largely aquatic and are found on land only during nesting season and when moving from one wetland habitat to another They inhabit a range of wetland and aquatic habitats including vernal pools marshes open swamps sluggish rivers ponds and lakes It prefers environments with soft muddy bottoms where it can lie buried in the substrate Snapping turtles hibernate in muddy substrate under plant debris or overhanging banks and it muskrat burrows Although they are known to bask out of the water it is more common for them to bask just below the water s surface with portions of its carapace above the water Snappers are most active at night and during the hours of dawn and dusk Snapping turtles are omnivores feeding on both plant and animal matter Fish amphibians small turtles invertebrates carrion and a variety of plants make up much of the snapping turtles diet Smaller turtles actively forage for prey while older larger individuals are more likely to use a wait and ambush hunting method Mating

    Original URL path: http://www.massherpatlas.org/amphibians_reptiles/turtles/snapping_turtle/index.html (2016-02-01)
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  • Massachusetts North American Amphibian Program
    on the original intensive volunteer survey that took place from 1992 1998 Download pdf of map Updated Distribution Map View interactive map showing an updated distribution based all records received to date including sightings submitted via this site Report your own sighting Pseudacris crucifer The calls of spring peepers known as pinkletinks on Martha s Vineyard are familiar to most residents of Massachusetts Yet many people who know it by

    Original URL path: http://www.massherpatlas.org/amphibians_reptiles/frogs_toads/spring_peeper/index.html (2016-02-01)
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  • Massachusetts North American Amphibian Program
    spotted Newt Back to Amphibians Reptiles index Distribution Map Information Photos Herp Atlas 1992 1998 Survey The map below shows the distribution of the Red spotted Newt in Massachusetts based on the original intensive volunteer survey that took place from 1992 1998 Download pdf of map Updated Distribution Map View interactive map showing an updated distribution based all records received to date including sightings submitted via this site Report your

    Original URL path: http://www.massherpatlas.org/amphibians_reptiles/salamanders/red_spotted_newt/index.html (2016-02-01)
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  • Massachusetts North American Amphibian Program
    of map Updated Distribution Map View interactive map showing an updated distribution based all records received to date including sightings submitted via this site Report your own sighting Storeria d dekayi 9 13 up to 20 True to its name the brown snake is dark brown to grayish brown in color It generally has a broad light stripe bordered by dark spots down the back The belly is pink or buff colored sometimes with rows of small black spots As a juvenile it has a light ring around the neck However unlike the ringneck snake the brown snake has keeled scales Brown snakes emerge from hibernation after the ground thaws in the spring They typically mate in spring or early summer and 8 20 young are born alive from mid July through August Although they are generally forced into hibernation by November brown snakes may emerge briefly during periods of warm winter weather Found in a variety of wild habitats such as wetlands grasslands and forests brown snakes are most often encountered in urban or residential areas It is not uncommon to find several or many brown snakes under debris in vacant lots parks and cemeteries Earthworms and slugs are

    Original URL path: http://www.massherpatlas.org/amphibians_reptiles/snakes/brown/index.html (2016-02-01)
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  • Massachusetts North American Amphibian Program
    on the upper neck and limbs The skin on the lower surface of the limbs can have an orange pink or salmon red coloration Males and females can be distinguished by looking at a number of different characteristics Males have brown eyes while females have orange eyes Males have slightly concave plastrons while females have flat or convex plastrons The tails of males are thicker and the vent the common orifice through which the contents of the digestive reproductive and urinary systems are discharged on the tail in males is located beyond the edge of the carapace Hatchlings typically have one spot per scute the head is always spotted and the tail is longer relative to the body size compared to adult Spotted Turtles Spotted Turtles may use multiple wetlands over the course of their activity season and they are often found within wetland complexes Spotted Turtles overwinter in a variety of wetland types ranging from forested swamps to emergent wetlands and wet meadows Upon emergence from hibernation Spotted Turtles often move overland to vernal pools where they forage and may mate Females will remain in wetland or vernal pool habitat until they begin nesting All other Spotted Turtles may remain in a vernal pool until it dries up at which point they will move to a different vernal pool or wetland or begin aestivation a period of dormancy or reduced activity during the summer Terrestrial habitat use can occur anytime during the Spotted Turtle activity season when individuals move between different types of habitat Spotted Turtles are omnivores eating both plant and animal matter They primarily eat while in the water unlike other turtle species such as the Wood Turtle which eats both on land and in the water The plants that Spotted Turtles consume are aquatic grasses and

    Original URL path: http://www.massherpatlas.org/amphibians_reptiles/turtles/spotted_turtle/index.html (2016-02-01)
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  • Massachusetts North American Amphibian Program
    map below shows the distribution of the Wood Frog in Massachusetts based on the original intensive volunteer survey that took place from 1992 1998 Download pdf of map Updated Distribution Map View interactive map showing an updated distribution based all records received to date including sightings submitted via this site Report your own sighting Lithobates sylvaticus This small frog with the distinctive dark mask is typically the first calling amphibian

    Original URL path: http://www.massherpatlas.org/amphibians_reptiles/frogs_toads/wood_frog/index.html (2016-02-01)
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  • Massachusetts North American Amphibian Program
    help Spotted Salamander Back to Amphibians Reptiles index Distribution Map Information Photos Herp Atlas 1992 1998 Survey The map below shows the distribution of the Spotted Salamander in Massachusetts based on the original intensive volunteer survey that took place from 1992 1998 Download pdf of map Updated Distribution Map View interactive map showing an updated distribution based all records received to date including sightings submitted via this site Report your

    Original URL path: http://www.massherpatlas.org/amphibians_reptiles/salamanders/spotted_salamander/index.html (2016-02-01)
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  • Massachusetts North American Amphibian Program
    sightings submitted via this site Report your own sighting Storeria o occipitomaculata 8 10 up to 16 Both the common and scientific names for this small snake refer to characteristics that help identify it Occipitomaculata refers to three light spots located just behind the head Redbelly generally describes the color of the underside although the color can vary from yellow rarely to orange to red The overall color of this snake is also variable and it can be brown bronze slate gray or rarely black Occasionally the three spots behind the head may be fused into a ring The redbelly has keeled scales distinguishing it from the smooth scaled ringneck snake Mating may occur in spring summer or fall but most matings probably take place in spring after redbellys emerge from hibernation in April Their young are born alive typically from late July through early September with 4 9 snakes to a brood Although woodlands are preferred habitats redbelly snakes are also found in fields bogs and wet meadows as well as along the borders of marshes swamps ponds and streams They are small and secretive snakes and spend most of their time hiding under rocks logs boards or debris

    Original URL path: http://www.massherpatlas.org/amphibians_reptiles/snakes/red_bellied/index.html (2016-02-01)
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