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  • Massachusetts North American Amphibian Program
    is tan grayish brown or brown has a mid line ridge keel and often has a pattern of black or yellow lines on the larger scutes The plastron lower shell is yellow with oblong dark patches on the outer posterior corner of each scute The head is black but may be speckled with faint yellow spots The legs neck and chin can have orange to reddish coloration Males have a concave plastron thick tail long front claws and a wider and more robust head than females Hatchlings have a dull colored shell that is broad and low a tail that is almost as long as their carapace and they lack orange coloration on the neck and legs The preferred habitat of the Wood Turtle is riparian areas Slower moving mid sized streams are favored with sandy bottoms and heavily vegetated stream banks The stream bottom and muddy banks provide hibernating sites for overwintering and open areas with sand or gravel substrate near the streams edge are used for nesting Wood Turtles spend most of the spring and summer in mixed or deciduous forests fields hay fields riparian wetlands including wet meadows bogs and beaver ponds Then they return to the streams in late summer or early fall to their favored overwintering location The Wood Turtle typically spends the winter in flowing rivers and perennial streams Full time submersion in the water begins in November once freezing occurs regularly overnight and continues until temperatures begin to increase in spring It may hibernate alone or in large groups in community burrows in muddy banks stream bottoms deep pools instream woody debris and abandoned muskrat burrows Wood Turtles are opportunistic omnivores their diet consists of both plant and animal matter that is consumed on land and in the water The Wood Turtle occasionally

    Original URL path: http://www.massherpatlas.org/amphibians_reptiles/turtles/wood_turtle/index.html (2016-02-01)
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  • Massachusetts North American Amphibian Program
    based all records received to date including sightings submitted via this site Report your own sighting Diadophis punctatus edwardsii 10 15 up to 27 Named for a yellow band around the neck the ringneck snake is relatively easy to identify when encountered Its back is either slate gray black or brown with smooth scales giving it a satin like appearance A complete yellow ring just behind the head along with smooth scales distinguishes it from redbelly or juvenile brown snakes The belly is bright yellow or rarely orange and may occasionally bear a few small black spots Mating takes place in spring or fall with 3 4 eggs up to ten laid in June or early July Eggs are about 1 long and are deposited together under rocks or other cover in rotting logs and stumps mulch piles or small mammal burrows Hatchlings emerge in August or September Ringneck snakes prefer moist woodlands as their habitat This is also habitat for an important prey item redback salamanders Although salamanders make up the bulk of their diet ringnecks will also feed on earthworms insects and on occasion fish As relatively small snakes they rarely bask in the open and are generally

    Original URL path: http://www.massherpatlas.org/amphibians_reptiles/snakes/ringneck/index.html (2016-02-01)
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  • Massachusetts North American Amphibian Program
    distribution based all records received to date including sightings submitted via this site Report your own sighting Nerodia sipedon 24 42 up to 55 This thick bodied snake is quite variable in color and pattern Background color ranges from light gray to dark brown It is almost always patterned with reddish brown brown or black crossbands near the head and alternating back and side blotches farther down the body The pattern generally becomes less noticeable as the water snake grows larger and often results in a uniformly dark snake Body scales are strongly keeled and the belly is patterned with black or orange crescents Courtship and mating typically occur in May and Jne and females give birth to 20 40 young in August and September True to their name water snakes are found in a variety of wet habitats including lakes ponds rivers streams and wetlands They are excellent swimmers both on the surface or submerged and commonly forage along the water s edge for prey Fish frogs tadpoles and salamanders make up the bulk of their diet though they will also take small mammals birds insects crayfish and other invertebrates Water snakes are very common and can often be

    Original URL path: http://www.massherpatlas.org/amphibians_reptiles/snakes/northern_water/index.html (2016-02-01)
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  • Massachusetts North American Amphibian Program
    Distribution Map View interactive map showing an updated distribution based all records received to date including sightings submitted via this site Report your own sighting Opheodrys vernalis 12 20 up to 26 Unpatterned and green above white to pale yellow below the smooth green snake is difficult to confuse with any other snake in Massachusetts Young snakes are dark olive or blue gray in color and could be confused with young black racers except that racers have a mottled pattern when young The smooth green snake has scales that are not keeled Green snakes emerge in April or May and mate in the late spring or summer Eggs are laid from June to September perhaps in two clutches of 4 6 eggs Females probably incubate the eggs inside their bodies before depositing them in rodent burrows sawdust piles mounds of rotting vegetation or rotting logs As a result the eggs hatch 4 23 days after they are laid a short period of time relative to other snakes Areas that support a ground cover of thick green vegetation are the preferred habitats of green snakes Fields wet meadows bogs marsh edges and open woodlands provide the kind of concealment cover required

    Original URL path: http://www.massherpatlas.org/amphibians_reptiles/snakes/green/index.html (2016-02-01)
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  • Massachusetts North American Amphibian Program
    own sighting Crotalus horridus 36 60 up to 74 MA Status Endangered Illegal to harass kill collect or possess A robust venomous snake the timber rattler is equipped with a broad triangular head vertical pupils and heat sensitive pits The body color may be yellow gray dark brown or black with dark V shaped crossbands across the back The pattern may not be obvious if the body is very dark The head is usually unpatterned and is covered with many small scales A distinct rattle on the end of a darkly colored tail produces a buzzing sound when vibrated When young the rattlesnake has only a small button on the tail Body scales are strongly keeled and the light colored belly is flecked with dark spots Mating usually occurs in summer or fall Females incubate eggs within their bodies by basking and give birth the following year to 6 10 young from mid August through September Female rattlesnakes typically give birth every two or three years Although rocky forested hill sides with southern exposures are essential as winter habitat rattlesnakes prefer dense forests with a thick understory for foraging They bask during the day and forage at night when prey

    Original URL path: http://www.massherpatlas.org/amphibians_reptiles/snakes/timber_rattlesnake/index.html (2016-02-01)
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  • MA Herp Atlas Sighting Record Results
    or invalid record id for update Required item is missing species Required item is missing obsdate Required item is missing name Required item is missing email Required item is missing status Please go back to the form and try again

    Original URL path: http://www.massherpatlas.org/data_collection/process.php (2016-02-01)
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  • Massachusetts North American Amphibian Program
    going data collection Report Sightings View Maps How you can help Frogs and Toads of Massachusetts American Toad Bullfrog Eastern Spadefoot Fowler s Toad Gray Treefrog Green Frog Northern Leopard Frog Pickerel Frog Spring Peeper Wood Frog UMass Extension Non

    Original URL path: http://www.massherpatlas.org/amphibians_reptiles/frogs_toads/index.html (2016-02-01)
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  • Massachusetts North American Amphibian Program
    sightings Common musk turtle 81 sightings Common snapping turtle 256 sightings Diamondback terrapin 11 sightings Eastern box turtle 114 sightings Northern red bellied cooter 10 sightings Painted turtle 411 sightings Red eared slider 6 sightings Spotted turtle 162 sightings Wood turtle 115 sightings Black rat snake 11 sightings Eastern garter snake 389 sightings Eastern hognose snake 34 sightings Eastern milk snake 196 sightings Eastern ribbon snake 37 sightings Eastern smooth green snake 49 sightings Eastern worm snake 3 sightings Northern black racer 96 sightings Northern brown snake 82 sightings Northern copperhead 3 sightings Northern redbelly snake 68 sightings Northern ringneck snake 158 sightings Northern water snake 164 sightings Timber rattlesnake 10 sightings Four toed salamander 39 sightings Jefferson Blue spotted salamander 65 sightings Marbled salamander 22 sightings Mudpuppy 1 sighting Northern dusky salamander 135 sightings Northern spring salamander 39 sightings Northern two lined salamander 245 sightings Red backed salamander 515 sightings Red spotted newt 236 sightings Spotted salamander 363 sightings American toad 349 sightings Bullfrog 357 sightings Eastern spadefoot 16 sightings Fowler s toad 68 sightings Gray treefrog 160 sightings Green frog 428 sightings Northern leopard frog 33 sightings Pickerel frog 298 sightings Spring peeper 508 sightings Wood frog 384

    Original URL path: http://www.massherpatlas.org/data_collection/maps.php?id=41 (2016-02-01)
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