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  • Maysie's Farm Conservation Center - Newsletter
    just what it meant I will be addressing Land Preservation in a series of 3 articles including a discussion of Conservation Easements and options for property owners Why would I want to do this Well I know there are lots of landowners out there who have no idea what Conservation Easements are and how they could work for them Additionally many landowners don t know what options are available to them besides wholesale development to glean value from their property or just keep their land in the family This might pertain to you or someone you know or to whom you are related OK I ll start with Conservation Easements and discuss options in the future A Conservation Easement is a legal document in which a landowner agrees to permanently give up certain rights to preserve the environmental integrity of the land It is recorded in the public deed records and is binding to any subsequent owners of the property Simply put this means giving up the rights to develop the property to its full potential under the applicable zoning Property owners can benefit from Conservation Easements not just by preserving the integrity of the land but also if certain conditions are met the property owner can receive a charitable deduction on their income taxes These conditions are that the easement must be perpetual and donated to a qualified organization such as a land trust and it must meet one of the following standards 1 conservation of land area for the general recreation or education of the general public 2 protection of a natural habitat or ecosystem 3 preservation of open space or 4 preservation of a historically important land area or structure For Conservation Easements current tax law allows a property owner a charitable deduction of up to 30 of their income with a 5 year carry over The Senate recently passed legislation that will increase the charitable deductions for Conservation Easements and extend the carry over period making the benefits more attractive in the future if the legislation makes it way through congress Stay tuned for discussions of options for property owners Charlene Briggs Mark Your Calendars Now The Maysie s Farm Annual CSA Picnic will be held on Saturday September 6 2003 starting at 4 00pm raindate Sunday September 7 Sign up to bring an appetizer main dish dessert or something for the grill then bring your family out for a fun time Brian Moyer who provides our chickens and eggs will be providing entertainment with his band The pool will be open and we re planning some fun games and activities as well as a 50 50 raffle Catherine Renzi is compiling a cookbook of members favorite vegetable recipes to be distributed at the picnic She s looking for more entries Send yours to Catherine at cmrenzi2000 yahoo com Save the date you don t want to miss this event We re looking forward to seeing you there Chard Swiss Style Louis P De Gouy The

    Original URL path: http://www.maysiesfarm.org/csa/archive/aug2003/newsletter4.html (2016-05-02)
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  • Maysie's Farm Conservation Center - Newsletter
    native plants and disturbed the balance of our ecosystem disrupting waterways animals insects and plants In less serious cases non native plants simply use extra resources such as sun water or soil nutrients and thereby make it hard for native plants to compete This leads to less species biodiversity in meadows woodlands and wetlands On the other hand native plants have evolved as good citizens in our communities Ð that is they coexist and thrive among Chester County s animals birds and microorganisms It was at this point that we decided to start a nursery specializing in native plant species that are indigenous to southeastern Pennsylvania and the Mid Atlantic region Since we started the business last year it has pretty much been non stop work but it has been energizing and fulfilling too We selected a sight on our property and erected a 20 x 48 hoop house to overwinter young plants In early fall we planted about 1000 plants in containers representing 20 species of mostly native plants Catherine and I never really calculated the amount of time and effort required to construct a greenhouse plant and care for 1000 plantsÑwe just did it After a lot of sweat and some worry we now smile because we have some great natives over wintering in the cold frame I remember Sam saying that one of his goals is to educate people on how we get our food It is a lot more complex than just going to the supermarket We believe the same can be said for native plants Most of us go to the nursery and don t really have an appreciation for what it takes in time effort seed collection soil composition water conditions and disease prevention to get the final plant you see at the nursery In some cases we may unknowingly be planting alien species in our own backyards One of our goals at Yellow Springs Farm is to educate others on how seeds and cuttings become plants Then these plants play a crucial role in our ecologically diverse biosystem We hope you will never again think it s just a field or no big deal it s only my yard We plan to have plants ready for distribution in early May just when the last frost will have passed and everyone has that itch to plant The plants we selected to start the season consist of spring bloomers ground covers ferns and others that will bloom throughout the summer We also offer species that are drought tolerant given the conditions that we all have experienced over the last several years And we always have our eye out for deer resistant species we have first hand experience with resident deer at Yellow Springs Farm There is more to come too We have plenty of room in the greenhouse and will be starting more plants in early March and June for September October planting We are thinking of starting some field grown woody plants and shrubs

    Original URL path: http://www.maysiesfarm.org/csa/archive/may2003/newsletter4.html (2016-05-02)
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  • Maysie's Farm Conservation Center — Newsletter
    would greatly appreciate if CSA members would contact me Amy Bruckner at 610 942 9327 with the information about your company s charitable contributions representative Fresh Spinach Dip Adapted from Better Homes and Gardens 5 cups cleaned torn spinach 1 15 oz can chickpeas with about 3 Tablespoons of the liquid from the can 3 Tablespoons olive oil 2 cloves minced garlic 1 4 teaspoon salt Combine all ingredients in a saucepan and cook over medium heat for 5 minutes Cool Blend until smooth Serve with crackers or chips Colcannon Don¹t know what to do with all that kale Try this traditional Irish recipe taken from the CSA Cookbook 4 medium potatoes quartered 3 12 cups chopped kale 1 Tablespoon butter 3 leeks or 1 large onion chopped 1 3 cup milk 1 4 cup chopped fresh parsley salt and pepper to taste Steam potatoes Steam kale separately Meanwhile heat butter in skillet add leeks or onion and cook until soft stirring frequently and or adding a little water to prevent sticking When potatoes are tender peel and mash them When kale is tender drain well Combine potatoes kale leeks milk parsley salt and pepper Four servings Attention Shareholders As the CSA season gets started we hope you are enjoying your vegetables Once again this year you will notice the presence of Distribution Managers when you pick up your food These volunteers spend a little extra time at the farm each week making sure the vegetables are stocked in the barn pointing you towards the pick your own beds offering recipes and answering questions BUT WE NEED MORE VOLUNTEERS This job requires no special knowledge or experience just a willingness to help out If this is something you may like to try talk to one of the managers on your

    Original URL path: http://www.maysiesfarm.org/csa/archive/july2002/newsletter3.html (2016-05-02)
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  • Maysie's Farm Conservation Center — Newsletter
    that the foods that are nutritionally best for the students are usually not served because the students won t eat them She then described several projects she has implemented to teach middle school children to prepare and eat interesting and healthful foods The students enjoyed these activities while learning a great deal about the foods and the nations from which they originated Dr Demas also indicated how information about foods can be integrated into many other standard courses including history geography social studies human ecology health and personal hygiene the several sciences and even mathematics support of independent farmers and ranchers agricultural based rural development a safe and secure food supply increased farm family income greater market competition promotion of organic food production and consumption conservation of natural and genetic resources and the recognition of farming as a dignified livelihood Professor Ray Weil of the University of Maryland led an outstanding workshop on SOIL QUALITY ASKING THE DEEP QUESTIONS TO MAKE YOURS BETTER After reviewing some basics about soils their content and properties he focused on the vital role that organic matter plays in soil health Organic matter which includes both decaying material and living organisms plays a critical role in maintaining texture porosity and nutrients In fact most of the soil nutrients are derived from the decaying organic matter Professor Weil stressed the importance of planting winter cover crops and revealed that cultivation can cause soil compaction and rapid loss of organic matter He judges the moldboard plow is the worst invention ever made The main message that Weil conveyed was that organic matter is vital to soil health and that this can readily be managed to improve and maintain healthy productive soils The Garden of Daily Living Author unknown Plant three rows of peas 1 Peas of mind 2 Peas of heart 3 Peas of soul Plant four rows of squash 1 Squash gossip 2 Squash indifference 3 Squash grumbling 4 Squash selfishness Plant four rows of lettuce 1 Lettuce be faithful 2 Lettuce be kind 3 Lettuce be patient 4 Lettuce really love one another No garden is without turnips 1 Turnip for meetings 2 Turnip for service 3 Turnip to help each other We must have thyme 1 Thyme for each other 2 Thyme for family 3 Thyme for friends Water freely with patience and cultivate with love There is much fruit in your garden because you reap what you sow The final workshop I attended was called AGRICULTURE AND DEMOCRACY FOOD AND FARM POLICY OF BY AND FOR THE PEOPLE led by Kathy Lawrence of the National Campaign for Sustainable Agriculture To a standing room only crowd Ms Lawrence identified the vision and priorities of the NCSA and then reviewed the status of the federal Farm Bill currently being drafted and debated in Congress She pointed out that the budget of the USDA United States Department of Agriculture is second in size only to that of the Department of Defense USDA programs cover everything from

    Original URL path: http://www.maysiesfarm.org/csa/archive/april2002/newsletter3.html (2016-05-02)
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  • Maysie's Farm Conservation Center — Newsletter
    s certainly a very broad mission I feel its breadth is justified by the breadth of the subject area Conservation is a very broad topic and reaches into all aspects of our lives from the food we eat to the energy we use to the waste we produce Every lifestyle choice we make and most are made without realizing that we have a choice has an impact on other organisms in our ecosystem and thus on the stability of the ecosystem itself The cumulative effect of all our individual impacts is something that our ecosystem is not prepared to handle because in the billions of years that it has been evolving our ecosystem has never before been assaulted by such a large population of such a high impact species as we humans today represent I expect you all already understand that the single greatest issue affecting the ecological health of the planet or of the microcosm we call Chester County is the unprecedented explosion in the number of humans living here but to reinforce that understanding let s look at the statistics one more time The world population of humans has been growing since the first humans appeared several million years ago but experts estimate that it was not until around 1830 that the global population reached one billion people But then we reached two billion around 1930 and three billion around 1960 and four billion in 1975 five billion in 1987 and six billion in October of 1999 This has never happened before It s happening right now in our lifetimes for the first time Ten or even fifteen years ago I was able to claim that the world population had already doubled in my lifetime alone from around two and a half billion to over five billion and that it was expected to double again to ten billion by the time I reached eighty years of age which won t be tomorrow or the next day but which will be soon enough And I would ask What are we going to do with another five billion people How crowded will it become in our lifetimes How intense will the competition be within this expanding population for the resources that are available on this planet in only limited quantities How will the other systems with which we share this world be impacted by this extreme rapid and unprecedented change The solution to this dilemma is not just better technology such as converting to sustainable agriculture and solar power though these are necessary steps and it s not just conservation of our resources though that is vitally important and it s not even just controlling the growth of our population though that must be done and as quickly as possible the solution requires a paradigm shift a widespread change in our attitudes so that these other changes can realistically take place We must adopt an attitude of reconciliation towards the other species of the world and towards the other members

    Original URL path: http://www.maysiesfarm.org/csa/archive/february2002/newsletter3.html (2016-05-02)
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  • Maysie's Farm Conservation Center - Newsletter
    me at a time when I was just way too busy to deal with it But Seth our first intern to have grown up on a farm dealt with it and more efficiently than I ever would have Paula our volunteer future farmer even put the Ford 9N to use mowing the area above the potato beds in Field 3 as the first step in creating more beds out there Seth has also been tinkering with our cultivating tractor the International 140 trying to work out the bugs that so persistently plague it And he and Liz have replaced the brake pads and calipers on the Isuzu pick up truck so it stops again Matthew has been working on reseeding all the bare spots in the sod that have been caused by construction work vehicle traffic and the drought All the interns participated in planting some 70 pounds of garlic which if we can keep the beds mulched and weeded should meet the garlic needs of our shareholders next summer and fall And we should be able to better meet the educational needs of our community now that we have an Education Coordinator on board one hired from within our CSA membership no less Dave Newton brings an impressive career of public environmental education to our humble organization He s taught environmental issues in community college and graduate school he s written a textbook on environmental health and he s served the public from positions in county state and federal offices He will be expanding and enhancing our existing educational programs so that they include an emphasis on non point source pollution and meet the objectives we proposed in our Growing Greener grant application Our lecture series continues to present great lectures to insultingly small audiences HINT HINT although Wangari Maathai spoke to a standing room only crowd in the Sykes Student Union Her theme was Change Is Possible and as a woman who grew up in a Kenyan village but is now talking to audiences around the world she is an inspirational validation of her theme Although relentlessly persecuted by her government for her work of empowering women and countering desertification she responds with the attitude Forgive them for they know not what they do You know sometimes I ve felt the same way about our government at least the They know not what they do part What have they done since September to make our country a better country or our world a better world Issuing latex gloves to mail handlers to avoid anthrax makes about as much sense as instructing students to get under their desks in a nuclear attack What have they done to address the inequities and injustices that breed terrorism Have they made any progress toward accepting the Kyoto Accord on greenhouse gas emissions Or do they still think it s a sound strategy to abstain from an agreement worked out by 165 countries while we arrogantly continue to release far more greenhouse gases

    Original URL path: http://www.maysiesfarm.org/csa/archive/november2001/newsletter3.html (2016-05-02)
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  • Maysie's Farm Conservation Center - Newsletter
    biodiesel co ops grass fed livestock products and community supported agriculture There were also workshops on topics such as alternative building techniques and passive solar greenhouse construction The afternoon portion of the conference consisted of five speakers who talked about the incentives of organic agriculture and food distribution as well as the benefits that come with community supported agriculture Jacob Bortman represented Maysie s Farm CSA and spoke about the importance of community supported agriculture in conjunction with building community to promote environmental education and conservation Jacob spoke of the values of intern labor as well as the valuable experience of being an intern on an organic farm He also talked about the importance of networking in the field of organic food production and distribution In the end the conference gave Maysie s Farm Conservation Center a chance to contribute to the networking that needs to happen and is happening among Pennsylvania s farmers consumers and conservationists One does not act rightly toward one s fellows if one does not know how to act rightly toward the earth Liberty Hyde Bailey in The Holy Earth Earth Charter Summit by Amy Bruckner Two CSA members Amy Bruckner and Paul Morgan went to an Earth Charter Summit meeting at Drexel University in Philadelphia on Saturday September 29 There were about 200 participants in Philadelphia as well as participants in 12 cities in the U S who were linked via satellite The meeting focused on the Earth Charter an initiative about promoting change for a sustainable future The Earth Charter recognizes that humanity s environmental economic social cultural ethical and spiritual problems and aspirations are interconnected It affirms the need for holistic thinking and collaborative integrated problem solving The goal of sustainable development is to allow human development to reach its full potential while protecting the ecosystem As a peoples document The Earth Charter was first proposed in 1987 for use at the United Nations Conference on Environment and Development held in Rio de Janeiro in 1992 At this Earth Summit the governments were unable to agree on language for an Earth Charter and instead adopted the Rio Declaration Following that conference there was a hiatus in the Earth Charter process until May 1995 when a meeting was called by Maurice Strong Secretary General of the 1992 Earth Summit and chair of the Earth Council Mikhail Gorbachev former President of the Soviet Union and president of Green Cross International and Ruud Lubbers Former Prime Minister of The Netherlands Over the next two years regional drafting committees met in Africa Central Asia the Americas Europe Asia and the Pacific The drafting process picked up steam in 1997 with national committees formed in 40 countries In the U S over 2000 people were involved in more than 40 meetings in homes religious centers universities labor halls and community centers The Earth Charter International Secretariat located in Costa Rica held three Earth Charter drafting sessions over the Internet that brought people together from 73 countries The

    Original URL path: http://www.maysiesfarm.org/csa/archive/october2001/newsletter3.html (2016-05-02)
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  • Maysie's Farm Conservation Center - Newsletter
    factory s smokestack or discharge pipe Nonpoint source pollution refers to contaminants coming from a lot of little sources such as automobile exhausts or lawns or fields that lose chemical residue or soil particles to the water flowing over or through them We will concentrate on educating people about nonpoint source pollution caused by agricultural and yard care practices and about non polluting alternatives to those practices The grant allows us to hire a part time education coordinator and that position was filled immediately but temporarily by Dawn Lawless who has already been doing great things for us as a member of our Education Committee as a program presenter as a Distribution Manager as a Newsletter contributor and as an innovative teacher at King s Highway Elementary School where she has secured grants to bring her students to the farm She jumped right in and laid the foundation for the Natural Lawn Campaign one of the two campaigns we will be presenting to our CSA membership You ll hear more about our ecological living campaigns from the Distribution Managers when you come for your food But now that the school year has started and demanded the majority of Dawn s time we need to find some other creative energetic soul willing to accept the title of Part Time Education Coordinator Could you suggest anyone Maybe someone who might especially appreciate the luxury of working from home most of the time since we don t have any sort of office as of yet Since my return from California we ve made some progress on moderating the either too much or too little nature of our water supply We ve put into use the well out in Field 2 that was drilled last year with donations from the CSA membership and a grant from The Claneil Foundation After a year of admittedly intermittent research I decided that rather than installing a solar powered pump I would install a regular AC pump connected to the grid and then install solar panels and what s called a utility intertie that would allow us to essentially turn our electric meter backwards with the electricity produced by the panels Now we can have a fully pressurized irrigation system that can provide water anytime anywhere instead of a system that would require either a storage tank on a hill or expensive and inefficient batteries to be able to irrigate after the sun has set This system will also provide the benefit of reducing the electric bill for the farm whenever the sun shines all year long not just when we re using the pump We ve installed the pump its pressure tank and control systems the electric cable the water main lines and three frost free hydrants so far and hope to put in some more mains a couple more hydrants and the solar panels as soon as we finish up some other construction projects The construction project designed to deal with the times of too much

    Original URL path: http://www.maysiesfarm.org/csa/archive/september2001/newsletter3.html (2016-05-02)
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