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  • Maysies Farm Conservation Center - Community Supported Agriculture - "Fresh from the Field" Newsletter
    and pay an annual fee of 10 For all of these products you pay when you pick up Checks for Ben s products should be made out to Ben Stoltzfus for all other products checks should be made out to Maysie s Farm but cash is acceptable for all our barn sales Leave the payments in the appropriate folders green for Green Haven Farm blue for Ben Stoltzfus and red for strawberries don t worry they re labeled And back by popular demand Ben is once again hosting a tour of his Amish farm Pleasant Pastures Organic Acres on Saturday June 10 from 11am 3pm raindate June 24 Besides meeting his delightful family you ll get to see cows calves pigs horses rabbits geese and chickens go on a wagon ride sample his raw milk products and my favorite help make and eat homemade ice cream This is truly a fun and educational event Ben asks that you call him at 717 768 3437 if you are planning on going so he ll know how many people to expect The farm is located at 648 Cambridge Road in Honey Brook see the barn for a map The unusually cold and dry spring we ve been having has slowed down the growth of many of our crops but the garlic that was planted last October is doing so well that we expect to offer garlic scapes on the first harvest days Scapes are the green flower stalks that grow above ground They are removed to enhance bulb development and they re wonderful to eat You can chop them up and add them to green or pasta salads pizza or anywhere garlic flavor is desired You can also make pesto using scapes in place of basil In a food processor add scapes and olive oil then stir in parmesan or asiago cheese Add pine nuts olives or tomatoes as desired and serve over pasta See you at the farm Colleen May 19 2006 Greetings FINALLY The CSA season is about to begin Sam Trey and the interns have been working very hard and are just as excited about the season starting as the rest of us are Here are some important dates MONDAY MAY 22 at 7pm at the farm is the NEW MEMBER ORIENTATION MEETING Sam will walk you through the pick up procedure and you can tour the farm Ben Stoltzfus who is our raw milk product vendor will be there Monday night with samples of his delicious products If you know of someone who may be interested in joining the CSA invite them to the meeting on May 22 We do still have some memberships available but Fridays are just about sold out If you are a FRIDAY pick up you begin next Friday May 26 from noon until 6pm If you are a MONDAY pick up you begin on TUESDAY because of Memorial Day May 30 from 1pm until 7pm If you FORGET which day you signed up

    Original URL path: http://www.maysiesfarm.org/csa/archive/current/may2006.html (2016-05-02)
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  • Maysies Farm Conservation Center - Community Supported Agriculture - "Fresh from the Field" Newsletter
    most were on farm and school partnerships growth of the organic movement and chemical residue in the human body Sam came back with a list of potential speakers he d like to recruit for PASA or Keep Farming First on who s conference planning committee he serves An Inspiring School Garden There s a garden at Lionville Elementary School that helps teach nearly 600 children This garden produced about 800 pounds of fresh produce last season on only 540 square feet in 15 raised beds The schoolchildren are involved in all aspects of growing the food planting seeds transplanting weeding and harvesting After harvesting the vegetables are weighed cleaned and donated to the Lord s Pantry in Downingtown as part of the Chester County Gleaning Program In the 2003 season 650 pounds of produce were sent to the food pantry and the 2004 season exceeded that Forty four families kept the garden going over the summer months The children have seen 54 vegetables three fruits six herbs and 15 different flowers growing in the garden There is also a 12 foot round butterfly garden that attracted many butterflies and some beneficial insects to the area The goals for the garden were planned to meet the Pennsylvania academic standards A garden helps the children learn the importance of agriculture identify common food plants and what is necessary to grow them well become familiar with the tools needed to produce food crops appreciate rich soil and what it can do and experience the joy of sharing produce with needy people The children are encouraged to take small tastes of vegetables growing in the garden Some things the children have tried are a sip of potato leek soup a fresh green pea straight from a pod just picked a piece of fresh spinach a green soy bean just blanched a cherry tomato right from the plant on a sunny day a taste of baby arugula and mesclun lettuce and a piece of baked celery root One of the best bug and weed controls for a garden is a class of first graders who quickly spot any bugs or small weeds and delight in catching them or pulling them out In the spring and fall all 1st 2nd and 3rd graders have an opportunity to sign up for an after school garden club This club and the garden are directed by teachers Mary Ann Wittle and Jackie McCalla by Mary Ann Wittle Where Are They Now Each CSA season brings a new crop of farm interns If you ve ever taken the time to talk to them you ll find that they have interesting backgrounds and fascinating plans for their futures In this continuing series I ll be tracking down past interns and updating you on what they ve been doing since leaving Maysie s Farm Returning shareholders from two years ago will probably remember Lucy Holliday the British intern who spent six months at Maysie s in 2003 She s back home in England working as a research scientist at an engineering company that specializes in anaerobic digesters biogas plants In this technology organic waste is broken down by bacteria in the absence of oxygen which then produces a bio fertilizer and a renewable energy methane Her specific research project looks at the different types of grass that can fuel a biogas plant Lucy also grows vegetables at work and runs experiments to see the effects of using bio fertilizer on them She s now living with her boyfriend Jonathan on his family s organic beef farm and happily reports that she maintains a vegetable garden there too You go back a long time with Maysie s Farm if you remember Abby Youngblood who interned in 1999 After Maysie s she won a fellowship to study sustainable agriculture and food security in Kenya India and Russia see Feb 2002 and July 2002 issues of this newsletter to read more about her experiences there and is now working on a website about the farmers she met and what she learned during her travels When she returned to the U S Abby worked for two years with the Greater Philadelphia Coalition Against Hunger helping low income families sign up for food stamps She recently finished a year long apprenticeship at Caretaker Farm a CSA in Williamstown MA Abby plans to continue farming her dream job is managing an urban farm that produces food for the surrounding community and educates people about where their food comes from by Colleen Cranney Why I ll Be Joining the CSA Again This Year Winter has never been my favorite season I m not a big fan of the snow and cold I don t like the shortened hours of sunlight And although I try to see the beauty in the starkness I miss the colors of living plants and trees Now over the past few years I have another reason to dislike the winter it means no more fresh locally grown vegetables for awhile I didn t always feel this way Five years ago when I first joined Maysie s the end of the season was almost a relief I didn t have to think about how to prepare the bags and bags of fresh vegetables I d get each week I went back to my old ways bought more processed food ate out more gained weight But by the time the following spring rolled around I was ready for the fresh vegetables again and made a conscientious effort to take everything that was offered at Maysie s even all those greens and learn how to prepare and enjoy them It s been a learning process and it s not always easy fast food and processed food are so convenient and cheap but I ve found that making fresh organic vegetables a central part of my diet has been well worth the effort I feel much healthier I have more energy and I surprisingly don t crave the junk

    Original URL path: http://www.maysiesfarm.org/csa/archive/current/apr2005.html (2016-05-02)
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  • Maysie's Farm Conservation Center - Newsletter
    them to good use The first four needs are for our new office which is under construction in the old staff room Wooden file cabinets especially 2 drawer Small electric range oven Small porcelain sink preferably single bowl but large enough to fill 5 gal buckets Sink base under counter cabinets wall cabinets and a short length of countertop material Picnic table s Large outdoor canopy Solar powered walkway lights ideally to match the two donated by Martha Thomae Straw bale chopper for mulching large areas Good medium sized pto driven manure spreader Tractor our 1967 Ford is becoming downright unreliable causes an unacceptable amount of pollution and cannot be rebuilt for less than its total value Assistance building a bio diesel production system or a compost tea brewing system Please contact Sam at 610 458 8129 or sam maysiesfarm org if you can donate any of these items We d like to say a quick Thank You for some of the major items that have been donated since the last Newsletter to Dee Camp and Dottie Jim Graham for the push mowers Mary Ann Byrne for the two computer Roger Slusher for the riding mower Phoebe Breskman for the upright freezer Don and Penny Halbert for the filing cabinets and the modular work station Steve Hacker for the picnic table and benches Peru Market Bags The Many Faces of Peru Las Muchas Caras del Peru by Dawn Lawless Peru is such an interesting place it contains many different life zones making it a biologically diverse country I had the pleasure of revisiting this beautiful land with a group of teachers and yoga enthusiasts sponsored by the ACEER Foundation We started our journey in Lima the capital of Peru This is a bustling modern city with eight million inhabitants Because it is located near the Pacific Ocean and west of the Andes it gets only four inches of rain a year Thanks to the Humboldt Current Lima residents enjoy a comfortable temperature range that doesn t fluctuate too much With the aid of a massive watering program the city enjoys greenery and flowers year round Machu Picchu Next we flew to Puerto Maldonado a much smaller city on the outskirts of the Amazon Rainforest Here the rainfall and temperature are drastically different We had a lovely visit to the local market to learn about the traditional crops such as cassava and medicinal plants before we took a boat to Reserva Amazonica Before docking we observed several caiman on the shores of the hotel s property Our rooms were comfortable huts with no hot water or electricity Night hikes proved to be exciting as we got to see spiders frogs caterpillars bats and black caiman including a live catch by our guide Day hikes including one to ATI Amazon Center for Environmental Education and Research s new building provided several opportunities to see a variety of primates such as the red howler capuchins and pygmy marmosets ATI has a new display

    Original URL path: http://www.maysiesfarm.org/csa/archive/aug2004/newsletter.html (2016-05-02)
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  • Maysie's Farm Conservation Center - Newsletter
    based drugs await discovery in the Amazon The question is will the forest be saved in time to discover them and learn of their uses from the native people It s up to us actually That s why ACEER has created medicinal plant gardens throughout Peru to save germplasm much as United Plant Savers does in North America and why ACEER hired Antonio Montero Pisco a shaman to be our garden curator There is a very strong and very essential connection between the work here at Maysie s and the work of groups like ACEER We each see conservation as ultimately a personal commitment to our communities and nature That s why I m optimistic So the next time you sip your cup of coffee or get relief from joint stiffness from Cat s Claw nibble that morsel of chocolate or breathe in the air made possible by tropical rainforests I invite you to pause smile and thank the forest and then recommit to seeing that future generations have the same blessing Wish List Looking to get rid of any of the following items Maysie s Farm will put them to good use The first four needs are for our new office which is under construction in the old staff room Wooden file cabinets especially 2 drawer Small electric range oven Porcelain sink preferably single bowl but large enough to fill 5 gal buckets Sink base under counter cabinets wall cabinets and a short length of countertop material Picnic table s Large outdoor canopy Solar powered walkway lights to provide light from the parking area to the barn Rechargeable AAA batteries for the walkie talkies donated by Cathy Fornwalt Working lawn mowers especially electric ones Straw bale chopper for mulching large areas Manure spreader or information leading to the acquisition of one Tractor our 1967 Ford requires an increasing amount of maintenance and causes an unacceptable amount of pollution Assistance building a bio diesel production system or a compost tea brewing system Please contact Sam at 610 458 8129 or sam maysiesfarm org if you can donate any of these items The Dollars and Sense of a Share at Maysie s by Carol Revak Have you ever wondered how your share at Maysie s compares to the cost for equivalent produce at the store You may be surprised to know how reasonable our share prices are at Maysie s We started a price comparison program at the beginning of last season and tracked the prices of organic produce at Wegman s compared to the average weekly price of a share at Maysie s The comparison was a little easier said than done however and we needed to make some adjustments in our tracking and consider several different scenarios For example There were times when we simply were not able to locate specific organic items at the store Their lower cost non organic varieties may have been available but we couldn t find the organic version So to address this we

    Original URL path: http://www.maysiesfarm.org/csa/archive/apr2004/newsletter.html (2016-05-02)
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  • Maysie's Farm Conservation Center - Newsletter
    drought and the ambivalent deer herd whose territory had been invaded The deer especially enjoyed the bloodroot and ate it down to the roots Trillium Bloodroot In November 2002 I replaced all of the dead plants adding Lobelia Lobelia cardinalis and Calamus root Acorus calamus on the western border I also constructed wire cages around the plants to discourage the deer Occasionally there has been a cage trampled and a plant eaten but for the most part the cages have deterred the deer long enough for the plants to have become established Thankfully all of the plants returned in spring 2003 except the lobelia inflata which tends to be temperamental and the Helonias root which the deer grazed The Bloodroot and Trillium made their debut with beautiful snow white blooms in April Black and Blue Cohosh emerged strong and healthy and the delicate Maidenhair Fern fronds spread along the intermittent stream flanked by beautiful quartz rocks in the heart of the sanctuary Entrance to the sanctuary is marked by two recently planted elderberry bushes and the red hydrant that is part of the irrigation system which was laboriously and gratefully installed this spring Plants growing in the sanctuary are at risk due to loss of habitat and over wildcrafting from the herbal industry At risk is defined as those herbs broadly used in commerce that are due to loss of habitat and over harvest diminished in population and viability within their current range This loss of habitat combined with the skyrocketing demand for herbal medicines throughout the world has brought us to a critical juncture where many important medicinal plants are threatened with extinction Though we may see many of the plants listed as at risk growing in our area bioregional abundance is not an assurance of a plant s long term sustainability Plants protected in the sanctuary are at risk of becoming extinct due to rate of range depletion and decreasing abundance There are many factors considered when placing medicinal plants on the at risk list These include the ever increasing tonnage required to meet growing market demand plant growth patterns maturity and survival rates under optimal conditions the part of the plant used for medicine root medicines mean destruction of the entire plant the specificity of it s habitat the rate of habitat destruction within the plant s range and the nature of the pressures such as urban sprawl logging or conventional agriculture impacting its survival By creating sanctuary a sacred space for plants we become stewards of the land we restore the idea that the land belongs to all of life even the pesky deer and we recognize that it is our job to restore it to its richest diversity Look for sanctuary updates and information on herb walks in future issues of Maysie s Messages Going Wild with Native Plants by Dawn Lawless Where does that trail lead Through the two rooms of the sunflower house past the fruits of our Growing Families Growing Gardens workshop

    Original URL path: http://www.maysiesfarm.org/csa/archive/aug2003/newsletter.html (2016-05-02)
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  • Maysie's Farm Conservation Center - Newsletter
    sale at the school The school managed to raise an impressive 800 to buy a GrowLab so students can plant seeds early indoors and get an early jump on the growing season The Home and School Association will also support the program when needed Lionville s produce will be picked up by Elmer Duckinfield the heart and soul behind Chester County Gleaning and taken to the Lord s Pantry Any excess will likely end up at a shelter such as Safe Harbor The 600 students will have the opportunity to sign up and help in the garden as needed in the summer Lionville is fortunate to have several enthusiastic parents who are Master Gardeners or Master Composters Wittle plans on having a garden bulletin board featuring This week in the garden and live television broadcasts that start each school day will be used to educate the whole school about many aspects of gardening She hopes to be able to weigh the produce so a rough total can be added up at the end of the growing season She looks forward to having the students grow some traditional crops and some interesting ones such as cotton peanuts kohlrabi and alpine strawberries Wittle thoroughly enjoyed working with the parents and students to build the beds The garden has brought so many positive comments One child stated with delight while fingering through the soil This is pure heaven I ve never planted anything before It s obvious that these three teachers were inspired by Maysie s Farm and are inspiring their students Maysie s Farm Conservation Center will again be offering this two day workshop for teachers The first workshop will be held on Tuesday and Thursday July 15 and 17 2003 the second one on July 29 and 31 2003 The hours for all days are 8 30am 3 00pm Continuing education credits are available Pass the word on to any teachers you know who may be interested Click here for more information Delicious Spinach Dip From Better Homes and Gardens July 2001 5 cups torn spinach 1 15 oz can chickpeas with about 2 tablespoons of the liquid from the can 3 tablespoons olive oil 2 cloves minced garlic 1 8 teaspoon salt Combine all ingredients in a saucepan Cook over medium heat for 5 minutes Cool Blend until smooth Serve with chips or crackers Welcome to Another CSA Season by Colleen Cranney Ah spring After the cold and snowy winter we had we heartily welcome the warmer longer days and all the signs of nature waking up The grass is greening the trees are budding the flowers are blooming and Maysie s vegetables are growing With our new farm manager Sharat and four interns already working hard at the farm this season is shaping up to be an exciting and DELICIOUS one Please mark your calendars for these important dates On Saturday May 10 starting at 10 00am there will be a Volunteer Workday at the farm There s sure

    Original URL path: http://www.maysiesfarm.org/csa/archive/may2003/newsletter.html (2016-05-02)
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  • Maysie's Farm Conservation Center - Newsletter
    share In its place we will build an area dedicated to our little ones so they may explore and utilize their senses and imagination We plan on incorporating four areas into the design We ll have a tepee garden comprised of bamboo poles in the shape of a tepee covered with scarlet runner bean and Jack be Little pumpkins This area will also contain strawflowers marigolds sunflowers and radishes Another area will be dedicated to attracting butterflies and birds We envision a birdbath bird feeder and bench surrounded by nasturtiums zinnias celosia nicotiana cosmos and sunflowers A third area will have a sunflower house and inside there will be a table and stumps for children to sit on in the shade of the sunflowers We will also have an area dedicated to perennial plants On Thursday May 24th students from King s Highway Elementary School s GLOBE Global Learning and Observations to Benefit the Environment Club will come to the farm to help plant seeds for this garden Anyone wishing to help may come to the farm at 4 p m that day or you may contact our volunteer coordinator Cathy Fornwalt 610 363 0892 to inquire about assisting in the creation of the garden at some other time We would like to thank Waterloo Gardens for donating materials totaling 50 Other items we need for the project can be found in our wish list Internview Liz Martin Intern Liz Martin is one of the wonderful interns currently working at Maysie s Farm She learned about the farm while doing research for her senior thesis on CSAs and decided she would like to work at one She is 21 years old and will be working here until early June From here she will go to work at a farm camp

    Original URL path: http://www.maysiesfarm.org/csa/archive/may2001/newsletter.html (2016-05-02)
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  • Maysie's Farm - Members Order Form for our Cooperative Marketing Partners
    The ordering form for Maysie s Farm members can be found here http mfcc mactim com If your browser doesn t automatically direct you to our new website please click

    Original URL path: http://www.maysiesfarm.org/csa/order.html (2016-05-02)
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