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  • Down to Earth Gardening Workshops
    Age s of child children Are there any allergies medications or medical conditions of which we should be aware Parent Name Address Phone Number Email In case of emergency Name and phone number of contact person on the day of workshop How did you hear about the workshop Workshop Time 8 30 AM 2 00 PM Rain date to be announced Cost per child 30 registration fee 25 for Maysie

    Original URL path: http://www.maysiesfarm.org/downtoearthform.html (2016-05-02)
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  • Maysie's Farm Conservation Center - Newsletter Archive
    Availability Contact Us Return to the Current Issue of Maysie s Messages November 2004 issue April 2004 issue August 2003 issue May 2003 issue September 2002 issue July 2002 issue April 2002 issue February 2002 issue November 2001 issue October

    Original URL path: http://www.maysiesfarm.org/csa/archive/index.html (2016-05-02)
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  • Maysie's Farm Conservation Center — Newsletter
    beware Judy has a unique way of passing the time while volunteering she reports that she is mentally visualizing a screenplay utilizing various shareholders as cast members She has fun picking out the various actors and actresses who will play the variety of people she meets at the farm Community involvement farm preservation fresh produce great recipes educational opportunities interesting screenplays There are many reasons for being a DM at Maysie s We are very very grateful for all of the help and support that our DM volunteers give to make the farm experience an enjoyable one for all the shareholders Our thanks to all of the following Monday Patti Donoghue Beatrice Semo Laura Richman Wednesday Judy Cseh Michele Kornegay Steve Hacker Jack Peggy Williams Denise Madden Mary Ann Wittle Friday Carol Revak Ed Dorothy Dickol Phoebe Breskman If you would like to add to your shareholder experience by volunteering as a DM we would love to have you join us We always can use more support and due to summer vacation and school schedules we will need some additional assistance for the remainder of the season No experience is necessary For more information please contact DM Manager Carol Revak at crevak comcast net or call at 610 942 2204 Maysie s Farm Welcomes Andy Lyon By Keenan Rew As of mid March this year Maysie s Farm has a new farm manager Andy Lyon You may have seen him about the place tools in hand and sweat on his brow From his days growing up in north central Pennsylvania Andy has toiled more of his life on a farm than off and as the manager at Maysie s he s quick to point out that he spends more of his time working than delegating I caught up with him during a well deserved break to find out how and why he came to work at Maysie s Farm KR Why farming what s the interest AL Well I grew up on a farm and I like the work I guess I didn t like working inside Also I had an interest in food I grew up eating homegrown food and I realized that if I go to college and get a job no matter what money I make it s almost impossible to buy the type of food I want to eat So I was motivated to farm for the quality of food more than money KR Was it a vegetable farm that you grew up on AL No it was just a homestead type farm It was never meant to be like a living and I guess historically that s the way my family always farmed you know they had a job off the farm and the farm was their source of benefits KR You ve been farming all your life then AL Well I did go to college and I started out going to college for engineering but then I went to college the rest of the

    Original URL path: http://www.maysiesfarm.org/csa/archive/aug2004/newsletter2.html (2016-05-02)
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  • Maysie's Farm Conservation Center — Newsletter
    class of kindergarten students donated clothing for some children in a rainforest village I was able to trade the clothes for a hand made necklace for each student in my class Upon my return I helped to organize a walk a thon in the Coatesville Area School District to raise funds for ACEER Students designed a t shirt which was worn by all participants in the walk a thon With the proceeds we adopted a school in the Peruvian Amazon and we purchased rain forest acreage in Central America The Adopt a School Program now transformed into the AMIGOS Program was a wonderful experience for my students We wrote back and forth to our adopted school Sapo Playa Pictures were sent to us showing the classroom materials that they received from our donation Our school looks to rekindle our relationship with another rainforest school through AMIGOS The trip also inspired me to start an organic fruit vegetable and flower garden at my school We meet a local need by donating all our produce to the local men s shelter With the help of Maysie s Farm Conservation Center the school garden idea has been replicated in three area schools with one more in the planning stage I m excited to share my experiences with other educators this summer We will have a busy and stimulating itinerary We ll participate in day and night hikes and cover topics such as soil bats adaptations ants pheromones bees pollination species relationships IPM integrated pest management agriculture aquatics and field study techniques Time will be allocated to meet local people visit two schools and to discuss development challenges and conservation issues After a delightful train ride to Machu Picchu we will visit the world s largest orchid garden and explore the Inca ruins If you are an educator I invite you to join ACEER Amazon Center for Environmental Education and Research West Chester University and me for an adventure guaranteed to change your life We ll be departing on July 25 and returning on August 4 Graduate and undergraduate credits as well as Act 48 credit are available through WCU Cost is 2970 and includes roundtrip airfare from Miami meals and lodging and educational materials A 500 deposit and registration are due on April 20 2004 Visit www aceer org or call Dawn Lawless at 610 384 7286 or Roger Mustalish 610 738 0477 for more details More Than Just Vegetables at Maysie s By Colleen Cranney Kale plants thriving late in the season In keeping with our mission and motto Think Globally Eat Locally Maysie s Farm is pleased to offer its CSA members other locally grown sustainably produced foods For the third year we will be offering pastured poultry from Brian and Holly Moyer of Green Haven Farm Every other week Brian will drop off the fresh eggs and freshly butchered frozen chickens which had been ordered in the barn during the previous two weeks Brian is expanding his operation this year

    Original URL path: http://www.maysiesfarm.org/csa/archive/apr2004/newsletter2.html (2016-05-02)
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  • Maysie's Farm Conservation Center — Newsletter
    has been interning at Maysie s Farm since February making her the veteran intern A native of Pottsgrove PA Theresa graduated from Gettysburg College in 2000 with a B S degree in biology and a minor in Spanish She then spent two years in Guatemala as a Peace Corps volunteer working in agriculture extension and teaching organic agriculture Although she s a vegetarian Theresa wasn t very familiar with CSAs before coming to Maysie s Now she feels she d like to stay involved in some aspect of farming perhaps in education or outreach and maybe utilizing her Spanish Theresa enjoys the camaraderie of living in the intern house but is also grateful to be able to spend weekend time with her family Her mother is one of our Distribution Managers Cassie O Connell has spent the last few years working as a residential carpenter in Philadelphia She loves working outside and came to Maysie s Farm to learn more about growing vegetables Her goal is to grow all her own food and to live as self sufficiently as possible Cassie is a vegetarian and spends her free time playing old time ukulele She also enjoys eating weeds from the farm and tending to her garden at home on the weekends when she s not attending SAITA workshops Lucy Holliday is the intern with the accent Hailing from Shropshire England this is her first trip to the U S Lucy has a B S degree from the University of Bristol in geography and environmental management Lucy is no stranger to farming she grew up on a tree nursery and her boyfriend has an organic sheep and beef farm Before coming to Maysie s Farm which she learned about through the internet Lucy volunteered for the Soil Association and the Farming Wildlife Advisory Group in England where she sought ways for farms to improve their management in order to benefit wildlife Lucy sees herself in the future working in an agricultural environmental area Tim Kelliher is from Massachusetts He spent a year studying chemistry at Swarthmore College then decided to take a year off school to work at and experience different kinds of farms He first worked at Tait Farm CSA in Center Hall PA where he started learning about growing organic vegetables He then worked at Threshold Farm a biodynamic CSA near Albany NY that offered vegetables apples and dairy products Tim will be returning to school in the fall but is thinking of transferring to a more agriculture based program He has started organizing a project that will involve Swarthmore students establishing a garden at a charter school in Chester PA He would love to have his own farm someday Elizabeth Hamer is from Jekyll Island in southern Georgia She graduated from Haverford College in 1999 with a B A degree in sociology After college she volunteered with AmeriCorps where she worked in disaster relief with the Red Cross primarily in Philadelphia She then went on to the University

    Original URL path: http://www.maysiesfarm.org/csa/archive/aug2003/newsletter2.html (2016-05-02)
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  • Maysie's Farm Conservation Center — Newsletter
    Manager no we desperately needed to hire a Farm Manager in order to avoid the diminished productivity we experienced last year I m not going through another year like that How is the new Farm Manager going to help He is helping already a lot His job is to keep the Interns productive by motivating and inspiring them by being there to instruct them and answer their questions and make sure that their time here is as educational as it can be And Sharat is doing a great job of it While I m in here overwhelmed by the volume of administrative educational conservation related work that the non profit generates Sharat is out there making sure that the seeds are planted properly in the trays that the seedlings are planted properly in the beds that the Interns are receiving the guidance that they need and that the work is getting done at a reasonable rate His presence here is probably the single biggest reason for optimism this season What else is new at Maysie s Farm this year Well the 30 x 96 hoophouse project that we began in the rain and snow and freezing weather of last fall is conspicuously underway but definitely unfinished Since we don t have the staff to be working on it at the same time that we re struggling to overcome an extreme winter and grow more food than ever before the project would be sitting absolutely untouched except for the generous help of a couple of our members Jeannine and Jeff Harris have volunteered to keep the project moving forward and will be putting one or more Saturdays a month hopefully with the help of other members into constructing the hoophouse The plan is to utilize this new structure to extend the season for certain crops by growing them in the ground in the protected but unheated hoophouse while still using our existing 14 x 48 heated greenhouse for starting seedlings in trays We ve established a new bed for culinary herbs just below the barn where we d had cherry tomatoes last year and as soon as the various plants reach the appropriate sizes we ll be offering the herbs on a pick your own basis Eventually we ll have a lot more culinary herbs than in past years We re also improving the sanctuary for endangered native medicinal herbs that Charlene Briggs started last year in the woods at the lower end of Field 2 We ve done some further clearing in there and Charlene has replanted the specimens that succumbed to the deer and the drought last year She s fashioned metal cages around the plants to thwart the varmints and has already made use of the hydrant we installed at the entrance to the sanctuary She s so optimistic this year that she s already scheduled an herb walk for Saturday August 16th In addition to the pick your own flowers that we ve had in the past

    Original URL path: http://www.maysiesfarm.org/csa/archive/may2003/newsletter2.html (2016-05-02)
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  • Maysie's Farm Conservation Center - Newsletter
    them stuffing themselves near brushy areas or woods They are diurnal for the most part Their favorite meal includes tender succulent plants which is not good news for the friendly farmer The woodchuck can do considerable damage to crops Hence we have Bessie Her main job is to reduce the number of critters eating the vegetables On a more positive note groundhogs create burrows that other animals such as game and furbearers utilize for refuge or a home Any woodchucks hibernating this winter on Maysie s Farm will begin to wake up and do what they do best eat plants Sustainable Agriculture Research Award By Louise Smith Through our Outreach Programs Maysie s Farm Conservation Center MFCC awarded a 100 U S Savings Bond and Certificate of Excellence in Sustainable Agriculture Research to Erica Rodriguez at the Delaware Valley Science Fair on April 11th The Delaware Valley Science Fair is an annual exhibit and competition for students in grades 6 12 from Southeast Pennsylvania Southern New Jersey and Northern Delaware who have conducted research in one of fourteen different scientific categories Sam Cantrell Executive Director of MFCC judged the research projects and carefully considered at least a dozen relevant projects primarily in the botany and environmental sciences categories Erica s project Comparing the Efficacy of Chemical Versus Organic Fertilizer found that even a simple organic fertilizer produces healthier plants and less leachate than a chemical fertilizer such as Miracle Gro Her display board and the verbal presentation of her work were excellent In addition to our MFCC award Erica won Third Place in her category 10th Grade Environmental Sciences an award from Women in Science and Engineering and a U S Army award Congratulations Erica Sam Cantrell encouraged Erica who is a student from George Washington High School in Philadelphia to continue her research and possibly focus on comparing different organic fertilizers i e composts made from different materials and over different timeframes Encouraging students and applauding them for their interest and research in sustainable agriculture is one of the ways we at Maysie s Farm Conservation Center accomplish our mission of increasing public understanding of the importance of conservation and ecological thinking Wish List Our Wish List this month focuses on things for the new Children s Garden Please contact Sam at 610 458 8129 if you can donate any of these items or services bird feeder bench or table 8 foot bean poles bird bath children s gloves children s tools And for cooking demonstrations we need Juicer Food processor As always we also welcome donations of hand drawn art for the newsletter Eagle Scout or Gold Award projects compost or transportation to haul compost Please contact Sam for more details 610 458 8129 Spring Old and New by Cathy Fornwalt I have lived through many Springs They ve become but routine Things Then I take my puppy out Spring is new to his young snout New smell new sight new scent new feel all new to him

    Original URL path: http://www.maysiesfarm.org/csa/archive/may2001/newsletter2.html (2016-05-02)
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  • Maysie's Farm Conservation Center - Newsletter
    to Earth Gardening Workshop They are being held on July 16 and August 6 for ages 6 10 and on July 18 and August 8 for ages 11 and above All youth workshops run from 8 30am 2 00pm Also tell any teachers you know about our two day Understanding Agriculture workshops on July 9 and 11 or July 30 and August 1 from 8 30am 3 00pm They include 13 hours of Act 48 credit To register for any workshop call 610 458 8129 or visit our website www maysiesfarm org Internview featuring Jeanine Connolly By Kevin Thrun Next time you re zippin around Ludwig s Corner and you get caught behind that beat up pick up ever so slowly luggin its way up the hill take a closer look before you do that 55 mph left of center blow by That bumper sticker Save Farmland in Northern Chester County will be a sure temptation to shout out something to the effect of We ll save farmland if you save that jalopy for the farm and get it off the road The smiling short haired lady in the driver s seat will patiently endure your breach of etiquette However you ll remember that smile and when you see it again on the face of that kind and helpful Maysie s Farm intern during your weekly produce pick up at the farm you re going to feel really bad Jeanine Connolly the first intern to arrive for the 2002 season first met Sam Cantrell in February at the annual conference of the Pennsylvania Association for Sustainable Agriculture PASA Immediately after the conference Jeanine returned to Maysie s Farm with Sam to learn more about his Chester County CSA After Sam s trademark informational tour of the farm Jeanine set right to work in the trench And she worked in that trench for close to a whole week clearing it and deepening it and widening it getting it just right to lay out the water and electric lines to the new greenhouse location just above the Church Field beds The trench was a thankless job and quite a difficult introduction to life as a farm intern but Jeanine with her tremendous patience and endurance made it out of the trench and made it out smiling Now assuredly she also has a smile of appreciation every time she turns on the hose in the greenhouse to water the seedlings knowing full well that the water isn t flowing magically but only as a result of hard work Such is the lesson of life on the farm Farming is about so much more than just planting stuff Jeanine often says as she tackles one of the jobs that seems to have nothing at all to do with vegetables like fighting with hundreds of yards of garden hose endlessly tangled from its winter storage There s so much work just involved in the preparation she observes as we cut back sod out of the

    Original URL path: http://www.maysiesfarm.org/csa/archive/july2002/newsletter.html (2016-05-02)
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