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  • Maysie's Farm Conservation Center - Newsletter
    my legislators Well I felt the same way until I was introduced to the Conservation Action Network CAN It s a web based action network originating from the Appalachian Mountain Club AMC Just go to www outdoor org conservation index shtml From there click on Conservation Action Network under the Take Action header on the left You don t have to be a member of the AMC and by joining CAN you will get e mails about pertinent conservation issues with links to send e mails to your elected officials You just fill in your name and address and the appropriate officials are selected for you A drafted letter may be edited in fact editing is highly encouraged and with the click of a button your input is sent Trust me it s EASY Coming next the National Campaign for Sustainable Agriculture Wish List Looking to get rid of any of the following items Maysie s Farm will put them to good use Straw bale chopper Picnic table Nyger thistle birdfeed Manure spreader Stackable sealable Tupperware like containers for storing seed packets Cordless electric lawn mower Please contact Sam at 610 458 8129 or sam maysiesfarm org if you can donate any of these items My PASA Conference Experience By Jeanine Connolly As soon as I received word that I was accepted as an intern on Maysie s Farm I packed my bags and left my home on Long Island NY I told Sam that I wanted to learn everything about farm life since I knew very little about it growing up where I did He arranged for me to attend the PASA Pennsylvania Association for Sustainable Agriculture Conference on February 8 and 9 So as I anxiously sat on the Greyhound bus to State College I wondered what life

    Original URL path: http://www.maysiesfarm.org/csa/archive/april2002/newsletter.html (2016-05-02)
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  • Maysie's Farm Conservation Center - Newsletter
    country like Kenya where 80 of the population is dependent on agriculture this has limited economic opportunities and caused a lot of suffering and hunger So in addition to organic farming we must continue to work for social justice fair trade and democratic and accountable governments As Americans we are people of privilege and we must use our privilege to create a more equitable world I believe that each of us can find a way to utilize our skills and talents to work for social justice and a world where everyone has enough to eat For me I hope that I can do so by improving my skills as an organic farmer and then teaching others I have also discovered that I enjoy meeting new people and connecting people to one another I have established a small network of organic farmers I m calling it the Worldwide Grassroots Network of Organic Farmers WGNOF My hope is that I can stay in touch with this group of committed farmers and also facilitate opportunities to communicate share ideas and exchange visits among farmers in this network If you are interested in learning more about my project please contact me via e mail at abby youngblood yahoo com Please be patient if I do not reply immediately I continue on to India in January Stay tuned for my next installment Do you know people who may be interested in becoming Maysie s Farm shareholders Please encourage them to attend our midwinter membership meeting for more information The meeting will take place on Saturday February 16 2002 at 10 00am at St Andrew s Church right up the road from Maysie s Farm We hope to see you there Please use the application form which can be printed out from here or you may use the copy you received in the mail to reserve your shares at Maysie s Farm for the 2002 season Mail it in today or bring it with you to the membership meeting on February 16 Non Point Source Pollution What Is It and What Can We Do By Dave Newton Education Coordinator As reported in our October newsletter Maysie s Farm Conservation Center has received a Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection Growing Greener grant to fund a two year educational campaign on non point source pollution and how we can reduce or eliminate it In this article I will describe the sources in our area that we will be focusing on in our campaign RESIDENTIAL COMMERCIAL INSTITUTIONAL LAND USES All of these development land uses have several characteristics in common First they tend to have large areas of impervious surfaces such as roofs parking lots driveways and sidewalks Whenever rain or other precipitation runs off these surfaces it carries with it any contaminants that may be there These contaminants or pollutants can include automobile fluids such as oil and gasoline deicing chemicals such as salt pet animal wastes litter and other potentially harmful materials The stormwater runoff often flows

    Original URL path: http://www.maysiesfarm.org/csa/archive/february2002/newsletter.html (2016-05-02)
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  • Maysie's Farm Conservation Center - Newsletter
    sow sheep goats chickens ducks geese and a pony And always Maysie had vegetable and flower gardens Maysie and Pete s marriage ended in the late 1950s and Maysie began her ten year career as a bookkeeper at Pepperidge Farm In 1961 she married Blair Henrotin an engineer who eventually opened a machine shop in Spring City Although Blair didn t farm he made extensive improvements and much needed repairs around the farm He also had the swimming pool built and specified that it be a foot deeper than usual as Maysie was an accomplished diver A natural athlete she was at one time on a national women s lacrosse team she enjoyed figure skating and played tennis regularly up until only a few years ago Blair and Maysie enjoyed sailing and it was Blair who encouraged Maysie to pursue her lifelong dream of flying Maysie got her pilot s license in the early 70s and began working the desk at Chester County Airport She is a past president of the Chester County Aero Club and is still a member of the Ninety Nines an international association of women pilots In 1974 she bought a Cessna 150 two seater In this plane she was able to visit her far flung children Sam in California Charlie in Montana and Sue in Michigan Maysie s flight log from her 1978 trip captures her spirit for adventure This journey included thrilling mountain passes landings at lonely airstrips and intermittent radio contact Besides piloting herself around America Maysie has also experienced some world travel She has been to Belgium Denmark Scotland and England including a trans Atlantic trip aboard a luxury ocean liner And in 1980 she went to Africa to visit Sam who was carrying out research in Kenya She enjoyed seeing the wild animals on safari and with Sam as a guide was also able to tour some of the sights that were off the beaten track For almost 50 years Maysie has lived in the farmhouse on St Andrew s Lane The house is filled with artifacts and momentos of her family s past as well as Blair s The Morris family traces its Philadelphia roots back to the 1600s and Blair s family was prominent in American history in the 19th century The house comes alive with history and memories as Maysie goes through photos documents furniture and knick knacks all of which hold special stories that illustrate a rich past Blair died in 1976 and for most of the following 20 years Maysie lived by herself It is a mark of her generous spirit that she strongly supports the CSA and Conservation Center with their corresponding influx of people Although she guards her privacy Maysie admits she likes having people around the farm I speak for all the members when I say we re very grateful to Maysie Henrotin for sharing her farm with us Best Wishes to the Interns by Colleen Cranney As the CSA season comes to

    Original URL path: http://www.maysiesfarm.org/csa/archive/november2001/newsletter.html (2016-05-02)
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  • Maysie's Farm Conservation Center - Newsletter
    the Gleaning Project At harvest time volunteers such as scouts and church groups come to harvest and donate the food Other farms allow volunteers to come into their fields after the harvest to pick what s left Finally farms such as Maysie s donate vegetables that are already harvested Every Friday evening a volunteer comes out to Maysie s Farm picks up the surplus and takes it to the designated food cupboard Surplus from Maysie s Farm goes to The Lord s Pantry which is an emergency food cupboard in Downingtown Located in St James Church on Lancaster Avenue this facility provides about 245 families per month a three to five day supply of food All of these households qualify for food assistance which means they earn no more than 150 of poverty level Traditionally they have received canned goods and other non perishables and according to Director Jan Leaf they are thrilled with Maysie s produce Fresh organic vegetables are a luxury they simply cannot afford and these foods add variety and nutrition to their diets On September 30 Sam received a recognition award on behalf of Maysie s Farm from the Chester County Gleaning Project He also received a Chester County Gleaning Farm sign which is posted on the refrigerator in the barn In a small but vital way Maysie s Farm is doing its part to help curb hunger and malnutrition in Chester County And it s reassuring to know that all the beautiful surplus produce is being savored and appreciated Internview Seth Bond As you stroll around the corner of the barn on a lovely autumnal day if you were to hear the roar of an engine it would not be unusual to see a tall dark man at the wheel or holding the handles of

    Original URL path: http://www.maysiesfarm.org/csa/archive/october2001/newsletter.html (2016-05-02)
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  • Maysie's Farm Conservation Center - Newsletter
    Greenpeace True Food Shopping List Greenpeace 2000 tells you which products on major supermarket shelves contain genetically modified ingredients and which ones don t Call 800 219 9260 for your free copy donations are appreciated or go to www truefoodnow org for a periodically updated version For a more comprehensive read Genetically Engineered Food A Self Defense Guide for Consumers Marlowe and Company 2000 is available at bookstores and on the web at www purefood org Coauthors Ronnie Cummins and Ben Lilliston clearly spell out the dangers of genetically engineered foods and tell consumers how they can make more healthful choices Kitchen Nutrition by Peter Zeiger D C Exton HealthSmart Spinal Center p c There are dangers inherent in the standard American diet primarily from the processed food business During the past twenty years the relationship between diet and health has emerged and been studied extensively Prior to this conventional nutritional directives stressed the four food groups and the Recommended Dietary Allowances warding off malnutrition Unfortunately these directives still exist and do little to defend against the dietary assaults present today that have been linked to our most common ailments and killer diseases Excessive fat content in our diet has been linked closely to heart disease stroke and cancer Dietary fats exist in two forms Saturated fat is usually of animal origin and is solid at room temperature Polyunsaturated fat is usually from a vegetable source and remains liquid at room temperature The current recommendation has been that these polyunsaturated fats are cholesterol free and low in saturated fat and consequently touted as the more healthful fats Following these guidelines many Americans are trying to decrease their intake of cholesterol and saturated fat as a measure of wellness However it s important to understand that not all fats are created

    Original URL path: http://www.maysiesfarm.org/csa/archive/september2001/newsletter.html (2016-05-02)
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  • Maysie's Farm Conservation Center - Newsletter
    provide the chickens shade and protection from weather Brian buys the chicks when they re one day old They are specially bred to get big quickly and are ready for butchering at six to eight weeks old All the butchering is done there on the farm This is the most labor intensive part of the operation it takes four to five hours to butcher 65 chickens The laying hens are raised in much the same manner They are protected by a low charge electric fence that is moved regularly Currently Brian s laying flock numbers 300 hens They each lay eggs for about two years after which they become stewing hens Both Brian and Holley work off the farm as well Holley for the county Intermediate Unit and Brian part time as an audio engineer for television They also have begun an exciting new venture by starting up a Farmers Market in Skippack Montgomery County Seven farms participate selling produce cut flowers baked goods and fruit Brian and Holley sell their poultry as well as lamb meat and cheese made from their goats The Farmers Market located on Rt 73 is open on Sundays from 10 00 2 00 from June through October and has been a great success Green Haven Farm s mission is similar to Maysie s Farm they are actively trying to make small farms stay viable They believe that selling directly to the public is a big part of the answer And they believe in quality not quantity Brian and Holley welcome any questions and comments and can be reached at 610 944 9349 We wish them continued success and thank them for providing us with such delicious and healthy chicken and eggs Internview Matthew Glenn Matthew came to Maysie s in early February and will

    Original URL path: http://www.maysiesfarm.org/csa/archive/july2001/newsletter.html (2016-05-02)
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  • Maysie's Farm Conservation Center - Newsletter
    Vermont and the Blenheim Apricot California And in an event that makes Philadelphia s Book and the Cook festival pale in comparison the Salone del Gusto is a celebration of food The 2000 Salone held in Torino Italy welcomed over 12 000 visitors who tasted hundreds of cheeses cured meats and cakes and over 1 500 other products accompanied by over 800 types of wine from all over the world Members of Slow Food receive a quarterly periodical Slow Recent issues have covered GMO foods transgenic vines and ritual in dining The editorial bias is decidedly toward organic sustainable agriculture Members are also automatically put in contact with a local chapter or convivium that has its own schedule and agenda Locally the Philadelphia chapter has been active since Fall 1999 Oh the other group that uses the snail in its campaigns Well it has 25 000 offices in 115 countries and it opens a new one every five hours It is McDonalds For more information about Slow Food contact John or Karen Karwoski 610 970 1564 kvkarwoski earthlink net Informative internet sites are www slowfood com www theatlantic com issues 99mar eatwell htm and www slowfood philly bigstep com Internview Nicole Georges Abeyie Intern If you had visited Maysie s Farm in early spring you would have found four slightly chilled souls working side by side planting seeds raking beds and otherwise preparing the farm to produce food for the Maysie s community If in the course of this work a question about farming came up many times all eyes turned in the direction of the intern whom I consider to be most serious about farming Nicole Georges Abeyie Nicole has been at Maysie s since mid February and she plans to stay until late August when she ll leave

    Original URL path: http://www.maysiesfarm.org/csa/archive/june2001/newsletter.html (2016-05-02)
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  • Maysie's Farm Conservation Center - Newsletter
    En co founder of CSA in North America A native of Chester County I am committed to keeping agriculture alive and well in this fertile historic and beautiful area The CSA model provides a situation whereby the pressures of the commodity markets and climatic vagaries are reduced for the farmer while the consumers receive the benefits of a connection to the local source of their sustenance and to nature I can think of no better way to farm at this point in history when small farms are on the verge of extinction and the general population is in danger of complete disconnection from the land I feel a sense of responsibility to show that organics and more specifically biodynamics is a viable alternative to chemical agriculture Through proper management techniques and hard work abundant healthy food can be produced while increasing the fertility of the land I look forward to meeting you on the beautiful farm that Mrs Henrotin is generous enough to share with all of us Think Spring and Thank You Alex Jennifer Wood Intern Jennifer age 20 has been working at Maysie s Farm since October on a co op internship from Drexel University So Jennifer where

    Original URL path: http://www.maysiesfarm.org/csa/archive/march2001/newsletter.html (2016-05-02)
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