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  • MEDA - Praxis issue du projet YouthInvest
    Égypte et au Maroc ils ont pour but d évaluer les impacts des interventions de MEDA au Moyen Orient afin d alimenter les programmes à venir Cette étude de cas présente une évaluation de la formation intitulée Comment mieux servir les clients jeunes offerte au personnel des Associations de micro finance au Maroc parle projet YouthInvest de MEDA La formation visait de sensibiliser le personnel de ces institutions aux avantages de travailler avec les jeunes dans le but d augmenter la part des jeunes dans leur portefeuille La formation visait particulièrement à identifier les caractéristiques des clients jeunes à examiner le cycle de prêt tel qu il s applique aux jeunes et à identifier les principes de communication adaptés aux jeunes que le personnel des AMCs peuvent utiliser pour transmettre les messages d éducation financière à leur clients jeunes Ce document présente les conclusions générales sur les relations des agents de crédit des superviseurs et des directeurs de antennes des AMCs avec les jeunes en mettant en avant leurs perceptions et leurs interactions avec les clients jeunes ainsi que le processus d évaluation des demandes de prêt et de suivi des clients jeunes Ce document met également en évidence les

    Original URL path: http://meda.org/publications/praxis-issue-du-projet-youthinvest (2016-02-17)
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  • MEDA - Afghan Secure Futures
    implement indirect approaches most effectively Afghan Secure Futures ASF So What Afghanistan Securing a stake for youth Download Welcome to So What a periodic look at MEDA s long term impact around the world What really changed as a result of our development efforts What got better for families and communities This issue looks at the Afghan Secure Futures project Afghanistan Securing a stake for youth Afghan Secure Futures ASF Leveraging Apprenticeships Download Series STRIVE for Learning Series Organization s MEDA FHI 360 Institution s USAID Displaced Children Orphans Fund Date Published December 2013 This report draws from the experience of the Afghan Secure Futures ASF project to highlight several important technical considerations when leveraging apprenticeships to reach vulnerable youth Its intended audiences are implementers and donors who are developing programming for vulnerable children and youth considering entry points for interventions or pathways for economic inclusion It summarizes findings from using an apprenticeship model to improve economic opportunities for vulnerable youth in Afghanistan ASF was one of five country programs implemented under the STRIVE program funded by the USAID Displaced Children and Orphans Fund in close collaboration with the USAID Microenterprise Development office cooperative agreement STRIVE is an Associate Award under the FIELD Support LWA Afghan Secure Futures ASF Supplementary Literacy and Numeracy for Apprentices Download This report summarizes the findings of MEDA s Afghan Secure Futures ASF project in facilitating access to supplementary literacy and numeracy training for vulnerable youth in Afghanistan as part of a market based project First the report finds that non formal literacy classes can attract vulnerable youth who are unable to attend school Second establishing trust with workshop owners through business related interventions can build their acceptance of initiatives such as supplementary classes for apprentices where benefits to the business may not be immediately apparent Third there is greater receptivity to supplementary classes if their commercial benefits are made clear from the outset Fourth data collected over the course of the project suggest positive impacts for apprentices and workshop owners Finally independent of public funding creating a sustainable system for supplementary classes that reaches working youth is a challenge ASF was one of five country programs implemented under the STRIVE program funded by the USAID Displaced Children and Orphans Fund in close collaboration with the USAID Microenterprise Development office cooperative agreement STRIVE is an Associate Award under the FIELD Support LWA The Afghan Secure Futures ASF Project STRIVE Activity Brief Download Organization s FHI 360 MEDA Institution s United States Agency for International Development Date Published January 1 2012 Although there have been some economic gains in recent years most Afghans continue to struggle financially and an estimated 90 percent of Afghan families rely on informal employment to support themselves Young people from poor families are generally unable to afford costs associated with formal schooling which places them at a disadvantage when seeking to enter the workforce In response the Afghanistan Secure Futures ASF project has engaged youth apprentices and informal sector small enterprises

    Original URL path: http://meda.org/publications/afghan-secure-futures (2016-02-17)
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  • MEDA - PPIC Work
    societies such as Egypt social perceptions and attitudes towards men and women operate at every level and sphere whether at home school or the workplace In the context of child labor these gender attitudes and perceptions are also reflected not only in the nature of work that the children undertake but also in the gender differentiated risks girls and boys face Such analysis provides critical information that would allow policymakers to better target policies and programs to the specific conditions that affect girls and boys In an ideal world these children should be enjoying a childhood of learning and development free of any form of risk However they continue to share the burden of poverty and of failures in social services and systems Until such a time when all children can enjoy an education and a healthy childhood free of hardship we continue to expand our knowledge of their conditions in the hope that if they must work then at least their working conditions can be safer with minimal risk to their current and future well being Download As young teenage girls Soumaia and Samaa used to head off to the local market each morning to bring back supplies of vegetables and help prepare their family grocery store for the arrival of customers We used to have to get up very early and the loads we carried were heavy Some people used to bother us on the way to the market as it was still dark and the traffic was always a worry But Soumaia and Samaa and their father Khaled were clients of a microfinance programme run by EACID the Egyptian Association for Community Initiatives and Development and they were about to negotiate a new loan In a conversation with the EACID loan officer they realized that if they

    Original URL path: http://meda.org/publications/ppic-work (2016-02-17)
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  • MEDA - SEEP Practitioner Learning Program
    and FINCA Uganda explore considerations around offering mission driven and sustainable financial products to youth clients Download MEDA facilitated the Innovations in Youth Financial Services Practitioner Learning Program a three year action learning project focused on viable models for achieving scale in youth financial services as well as understanding critical stages that organizations must move through to achieve scale Four learning products were developed including this case study created in partnership with Hatton National Bank and XacBank This case study compares and contrasts the youth financial education programs of Hatton National Bank HNB and XacBank exploring their design content segmentation target groups and delivery methods In particular the case study focuses on how providing appropriate financial education services can ultimately contribute to scaling up financial services for youth Download MEDA facilitated the Innovations in Youth Financial Services Practitioner Learning Program a three year action learning project focused on viable models for achieving scale in youth financial services as well as understanding critical stages that organizations must move through to achieve scale Four learning products were developed including this technical note In this technical note FINCA Uganda and Hatton National Bank Sri Lanka HNB explore key components and issues around the institutionalization of youth financial services based on their individual experiences Topics that are explored include key considerations steps and challenges of institutionalization While some universal aspects of institutionalization are covered this document primarily examines differences in institutionalizing youth financial products as opposed to financial products targeted to non youth Download MEDA facilitated the Innovations in Youth Financial Services Practitioner Learning Program a three year action learning project focused on viable models for achieving scale in youth financial services as well as understanding critical stages that organizations must move through to achieve scale Four learning products were developed including this toolkit

    Original URL path: http://meda.org/publications/seep-practitioner-learning-program (2016-02-17)
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  • MEDA - SEEP Youth and Financial Services Working Group
    behaviors that are influenced by young people s income flows expected contributions to their families and experience and perception of formal financial services At the institutional level it examines how different market segments e g current life stage and or age gender enrollment status and geographic location affect youth financial behaviors and consequently the design of both delivery mechanisms and products Insights into the money flows and financial behaviors of youth provide an important launching point for FSPs to design appropriate and sustainable youth friendly products They can also serve as a reference for policy makers seeking to develop promote or strengthen new or existing youth programs within their respective countries Download This paper is one in a series of Promising Practices Briefs written and commissioned by the SEEP Network s Youth and Financial Services Working Group These documents explore innovations and address operational issues in the promotion of effective financial services for youth Topics were selected during a series of consultations held with Working Group members in January 2015 Download This paper is one in a series of Promising Practices Briefs written and commissioned by the SEEP Network s Youth and Financial Services Working Group These documents explore innovations and address operational issues in the promotion of effective financial services for youth Topics were selected during a series of consultations held with Working Group members in January 2015 Download This paper is one in a series of Promising Practices Briefs written and commissioned by the SEEP Network s Youth and Financial Services Working Group These documents explore innovations and address operational issues in the promotion of effective financial services for youth Topics were selected during a series of consultations held with Working Group members in January 2015 Download This paper is one in a series of Promising Practices Briefs

    Original URL path: http://meda.org/publications/seep-youth-and-financial-services-working-group (2016-02-17)
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  • MEDA - Publications
    skills for future employment or academic opportunities Download This report explores the results and lessons learned from the project s Occupational Health and Safety OHS interventions with both young workers through the Keep Safe Program and with employers through the OHS and Business Owner s Incentives Programs The Project delivered complementary programs for both employers and their employees to improve working conditions and safety of youth engaged in spinning and weaving work in Addis Ababa Download This report is one in a series focused on MEDA s E FACE project developed towards the end of the project to assess the impact of MEDA s youth oriented interventions and learn from and strengthen them for future interventions This report explores the results from the project s Building Skills for Life BS4L program for young girls and boys engaged in the traditional textile industry in Addis Ababa Download This report explores savings behavior among youth including changes in their livelihoods behaviors and working environment as a result of their participation in savings groups Download An overview of the E FACE Child Safe Certification intervention Download An overview of the E FACE Business Owner Incentives Plan intervention Download An overview of the E

    Original URL path: http://meda.org/media-eface/publications-eface (2016-02-17)
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  • MEDA - General
    important gap at the intersection between programs seeking to support vulnerable children and those seeking to reduce their economic challenges The document outlines best practices for economic strengthening that are appropriate to multi sectoral teams and programs David James Wilson Veronica Torres Thierry van Bastelaer and Brenda Yamba Save the Children Lisa Parrott MicroSave and Save the Children Margie Brand EcoVentures International and Ben Fowler MEDA February 2008 Impacts of Microfinance Initiatives on Children Download MEDA and Partners in Technology Exchange PTE co authored Impacts of Microfinance Initiatives on Children a DFATD commissioned study that examined the impacts of microfinance activities on children in Egypt Bolivia Tanzania and India The 2007 report found that children were actively engaged in many if not most of the microenterprises examined Study findings suggest that children play an important role in the initial growth of family enterprises that begin to access credit through microfinance institutions Engagement in a family or non family business allows children to acquire new technical business and life skills that can lead them to a future business career though risks to children must be minimized for these benefits to be realized More Inclusive Finance for Youth Scalable and Sustainable Delivery Models for Financial and Non Financial Services Download Over the past decade there has been a surge in investment to advance youth financial inclusion with various organizations around the world testing and evaluating a variety of financial instruments targeting young people in low income countries Many of these projects have incorporated a non financial component mainly financial education or business and vocational training aimed at further strengthening young people s financial capability and business skills The e MFP Youth Financial Inclusion Action Group was tasked to document these youth financial services that have integrated components of non financial services INMAA

    Original URL path: http://meda.org/publications/general (2016-02-17)
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  • MEDA
    Washington DC hosted by Making Cents International This event is always a great convening place for the who s who in youth in development including funders implementers policy makers youth leaders companies educators and researchers This year the event brought together over 450 stakeholders from 50 countries to exchange knowledge effect practice and improve the performance of youth economic opportunity programming worldwide MEDA s Senior Project Manager of Youth and Financial Services Nicki Post with Rani Deshpandi of Save the Children and Ata Cisse of UNCDF panelists at the Global Youth Economic Opportunities Summit 2015 Continue reading Youth in Development 691 Hits Monday 19 October 2015 The Role of Parents and Families in Youth Financial Inclusion Jennifer Denomy Director Youth Economic Opportunities The United Nations Population Fund reports that there are 1 8 billion young people between the ages of 10 and 24 with 89 percent of them residing in less developed countries 2014 With appropriate knowledge and tools youth can be financially empowered to access economic opportunities in a sustainable manner Although they represent a large potential market the integration of youth into the formal financial system is still a relatively new concept in many countries In order to address these operational issues and explore innovations in this area the SEEP Network s Youth and Financial Services Working Group commissioned and wrote four Promising Practices Briefs The topics of the briefs were selected during a series of consultations held with Working Group members in January 2015 Tags Financial Inclusion Youth Economic Opportunities SEEP Network SEEP YFS Working Group Continue reading Youth in Development 903 Hits Tuesday 29 September 2015 Incentives Subsidies and Complementary Services to Promote Youth Financial Inclusion Jennifer Denomy Director Youth Economic Opportunities This blog originally appeared on The SEEP Network Blogg co authored by Jennifer Denomy and Rebecca Hession The United Nations Population Fund reports that there are 1 8 billion young people between the ages of 10 and 24 with 89 percent of them residing in the world s least developed countries 2014 With appropriate knowledge and tools youth can be financially empowered to access a range of economic opportunities over the course of their lives Although they represent a large potential market the integration of youth into the formal financial system is still a relatively new concept in many countries In order to address these operational issues and explore innovations in this area the SEEP Network s Youth and Financial Services Working Group commissioned and wrote four Promising Practices Briefs The topics of the briefs were selected during a series of consultations held with Working Group members in January 2015 Tags SEEP Network SEEP YFS Working Group Youth Economic Opportunities Financial Inclusion Continue reading Youth in Development 1237 Hits Tuesday 15 September 2015 Usage and Dormancy of Youth Accounts Jennifer Denomy Director Youth Economic Opportunities This blog originally appeared on The SEEP Network Blog co authored by Jennifer Denomy and Rebecca Hession The United Nations Population Fund reports that there are 1 8 billion young people between the ages of 10 and 24 with 89 percent of them residing in less developed countries 2014 With appropriate knowledge and tools youth can be financially empowered to access economic opportunities in a sustainable manner Although they represent a large potential market the integration of youth into the formal financial system is still a relatively new concept in many countries In order to address these operational issues and explore innovations in this area the SEEP Network s Youth and Financial Services Working Group commissioned and wrote four Promising Practices Briefs The topics of the briefs were selected during a series of consultations held with Working Group members in January 2015 Tags Youth Economic Opportunities Youth in Development Financial Inclusion Youth SEEP Network Continue reading Youth in Development 2396 Hits Tuesday 01 September 2015 Assessing Youth Financial Needs in Cross River State Keisha Thomas Senior Technical Advisor Financial Inclusion YouLead Project MEDA is partnering with Cuso International to improve financial inclusion for youth in Nigeria The project titled Youth Leadership Entrepreneurship Access and Development YouLead works with young women and men in Cross River State Nigeria Following MEDA s detailed institutional assessment of financial sector in Cross River State five financial inclusion partners were selected for capacity building support Subsequently an assessment of Youth Financial Needs was undertaken in May June 2015 This blog documents the key findings of this assessment Why was the assessment needed Tags YouLead Youth Youth in Development Youth Economic Opportunities Continue reading Youth in Development 1565 Hits Wednesday 19 August 2015 Looking Back At YouthInvest Lowering Barriers and Increasing Uptake Nicki Post Senior Consultant Project Manager Youth Economic Opportunities Lowering Barriers and Increasing Uptake In the past few blogs we have taken you through the journey that we took when developing youth friendly financial products and services in Morocco looking at the importance of supporting frontline MFI staff and making the business case for MFIs to offer youth financial products But have we really accomplished anything Are more youth accessing financial services Let s begin this final blog entry on our YouthInvest Praxis Series by looking at the strategies that were deployed to facilitate access to and improve usage of our partners financial products and services It was YouthInvest s philosophy that access to financial services should never be a solitary offering but should be paired with the appropriate training This was one of the cornerstones of our approach where we worked to ensure that clients were not only able to access products appropriate to their needs but also understood the products and services they were availing Tags YouthInvest Microfinance Institution Morocco Praxis Series Youth Economic Opportunities Continue reading Youth in Development 2096 Hits Thursday 13 August 2015 Effective Integration of Financial Services into Economic Opportunities Programming for Youth Jennifer Denomy Director Youth Economic Opportunities How can financial services be effectively integrated into economic opportunities programming for youth The SEEP Network s Youth and Financial Services Working Group facilitated by MEDA recently completed

    Original URL path: http://meda.org/team-blog (2016-02-17)
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