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  • United States v. Williams | mediacoalition
    Amendment nor impermissibly vague under the Due Process Clause of the Fifth Amendment An amicus brief was submitted on behalf of some Media Coalition members on August 14 2007 It focused on the danger to mainstream media marketing if the pandering doctrine is expanded so that marketing can be deemed illegal even if the product is not illegal solely because the marketing may suggest to some that the product is

    Original URL path: http://mediacoalition.org/us-v-williams/ (2016-04-24)
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  • Upper Midwest Booksellers Association v. City of Minneapolis | mediacoalition
    8th Cir 1985 aff g 602 F Supp 1361 D Minn 1985 In 1985 the Eighth Circuit Court of Appeals ruled in Upper Midwest Booksellers Association v Minneapolis that a harmful to minors access statute is a permissible time place

    Original URL path: http://mediacoalition.org/upper-midwest-booksellers-v-minneapolis/ (2016-04-24)
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  • Vance v. Universal Amusement Co., Inc. | mediacoalition
    445 U S 308 1980 The Supreme Court ruled that a Texas public nuisance statute permitting prior restraint of allegedly obscene motion pictures without prompt judicial review is unconstitutional Media Coalition filed an amicus brief in this case Contact 19

    Original URL path: http://mediacoalition.org/vance-v-universal-amusement/ (2016-04-24)
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  • Video Software Dealers Association v. City of Oklahoma | mediacoalition
    1292 W D Okla 1997 On December 18 1998 the District Court for the Western District of Oklahoma ruled that the Tin Drum was not child pornography and that its seizure was an unlawful prior restraint Media Coalition filed an

    Original URL path: http://mediacoalition.org/vsda-v-oklahoma/ (2016-04-24)
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  • Video Software Dealers Association v. Maleng | mediacoalition
    depictions of violence against law enforcement officers History A complaint was filed on June 5 2003 in the U S District Court for the Western District of Washington in Seattle challenging Washington House Bill 1009 The plaintiffs in the case included the Video Software Dealers Association Interactive Digital Software Association Washington Retail Association Interactive Entertainment Merchants Association International Game Developers Association and Hollywood Entertainment Corporation The defendants were Norm Maleng in his capacity as King County prosecuting attorney Washington governor Gary Locke and Washington attorney general Christine O Gregoire The bill would have prohibited the rental or sale to anyone under age 17 of computer and video games containing depictions of violence against law enforcement officers The bill was set to go into effect on July 27 but on July 11 U S District Court Judge Robert S Lasnik granted the plaintiffs motion for a preliminary injunction baring enforcement of the law On September 15 the plaintiffs filed a motion for summary judgment Members of the Media Coalition submitted an amicus brief January 30 2004 in support of the plaintiffs Oral arguments were heard June 24 and July 19 Judge Lasnik granted the plaintiffs request for summary judgment striking down

    Original URL path: http://mediacoalition.org/vsda-v-maleng/ (2016-04-24)
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  • Village Books v. City of Bellingham | mediacoalition
    material containing depictions or descriptions of nudity or sexual activity In 1988 plaintiffs challenged the ordinance in the U S District Court for the Western District of Washington The City of Bellingham conceded the ordinance was unconstitutional Washington Women for Civil Rights intervened to defend the law On February 9 1989 the U S District Court Judge Carolyn Dimmick held 1 that it was bound by the Supreme Court s

    Original URL path: http://mediacoalition.org/village-books-v-bellingham/ (2016-04-24)
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  • Virginia v. American Booksellers Association, Inc. | mediacoalition
    States Supreme Court affirmed the plaintiffs standing to challenge the law absent the threat of prosecution The United States Court of Appeals for the 4th Circuit upheld the law after the Virginia Supreme Court narrowed it to apply only to the display of materials that would be illegal for the oldest minors History In 1985 Virginia enacted its minor access law that made it unlawful for any person to knowingly display for commercial purpose in a manner whereby juveniles may examine and peruse visual or written material that is harmful to juveniles This case was filed as American Booksellers Association Inc v Strobel in the U S District Court in Virginia In 1985 the court held 6 that the legislation violated the First Amendment and its enforcement was enjoined The United States Court of Appeals for the 4th Circuit 5 affirmed the decision The state of Virginia filed a petition for cert which was granted by the Supreme Court On January 25 1988 the U S Supreme Court issued an opinion 4 affirming that plaintiffs had standing to bring the challenge The Court did not rule on the constitutional issues in the case Instead it asked the Virginia Supreme Court to interpret provisions of Virginia s display law Justice William Brennan wrote the majority opinion of the Court Justice John Paul Stevens wrote an opinion concurring in part and dissenting in part In response to questions certified by the United States Supreme Court the Virginia Supreme Court narrowed 2 the state s minors access law so that it applied only to the display of material that would be illegal for the oldest minors The U S Supreme Court then vacated the judgment and remanded it to the 4th Circuit Court for further consideration given the Virginia Supreme Court s definition

    Original URL path: http://mediacoalition.org/virginia-v-aba/ (2016-04-24)
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  • Yahoo!, Inc. v. LICRA (La Ligue Contre Le Racisme et L’Antisemitisme) | mediacoalition
    D Cal 2001 In December 2000 a French court held U S based Yahoo Inc liable under a broad French anti hate law for content carried on its auction site in the United States solely because the site is accessible to French citizens The ruling which held Yahoo liable for postings of Nazi and other World War II memorabilia holds Yahoo responsible for damages of nearly 100 000 a day

    Original URL path: http://mediacoalition.org/yahoo-v-licra/ (2016-04-24)
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