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  • nominations – MediCaring.org
    provide financial or managerial support or at least listen to new ideas if they are put forward by an award winning doctor Award winner Justin Baker MD FAAP at St Jude Children s in Memphis for example reported that he was named head of the unit and got the OK on 2 FTE s immediately after the announcement of his award thus pushing St Jude s commitment to the public sphere In another example Baxter cites senior award winner Dr Janet Bull chief medical officer and principal investigator of Four Seasons a nonprofit hospice and palliative care organization that serves the Hendersonville and Asheville regions of western North Carolina Dr Bull is directing her entire 25 000 award to the Four Seasons Hospice sister organization in Zambia Awards programs that work do exactly what we see with Drs Baker and Bull they have a definitive ripple effect affecting not just winners but also leveraging their ideas hopes and passions for the benefit of others For early career physician winners such as Savithri Nagaswaran MBBS DCH MPH director of the pediatric palliative care program at Brenner Children s Hospital at Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center in Winston Salem N C the awards instill confidence that can make a huge difference in an already promising career As Baxter notes Physicians like Savi are really laying down the gauntlet for the future of this area of medicine And believe me these young docs get the ramifications of what they are doing in terms of medical economics and national policy They plan to change the world and we are giving them even more confidence Public recognition of people who are changing the world of care at end of life is an awesome venture It puts faces on what good doctoring at the end of life looks like It gives me and others who care about improving healthcare for aging advanced illness populations the ability to point and say definitively This is what it looks like this is how it can be for you In the scheme of things the Foundation s awards program is a relatively modest undertaking As Baxter explains We do not have the financial resources of many other foundations But our goals are lofty and meaningful and we have passion about our endeavor We believe that we can make a difference And I believe that too These awards are making a difference Yes it s an individual competition honoring physicians and only a few are chosen each year But the ripple effect creates broader impact This year the awards committee is especially interested in broadening the field of nominations to include not just palliative care or hospice docs but also physicians in primary care geriatrics or other fields that address the needs of aging advanced chronic illness populations So spread the word tell your friends colleagues patients and their family members to nominate a worthy physician Post the announcement on Twitter and Tumblr and Facebook Good doctoring needs to be

    Original URL path: http://medicaring.org/tag/nominations/ (2016-04-30)
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  • Adam Singer – MediCaring.org
    from 1998 to 2010 although most of these trends did not reach statistical significance The one exception is that there were no significant changes in the subgroup with cancer High and worsening symptom prevalence near the end of life raises serious concerns about stubbornly ingrained shortcomings in end of life care despite the increasing national attention and resources being devoted to it Indeed recent studies of health care performance suggest that many providers continue to fall short in symptom management near the end of life 2 3 4 The fact that pain remains common is particularly troubling as this symptom is highly visible well studied relatively reliably ameliorated and has a large impact on health related quality of life 5 On the other hand it is encouraging that trends in symptom prevalence in cancer may have stabilized While there have been many positive developments in end of life care since 1997 the Annals study shows that much more effort is needed to ensure that policy and organizational change translate to improvements in actual patient outcomes Along these lines there are many reasons why end of life symptom prevalence may not have improved since the IOM report Intensity of treatment has been increasing near the end of life and even though hospice use doubled from 2000 to 2009 the median stay is under three weeks 6 7 Tacking on hospice to otherwise intense late life care may leave patients suffering in the meantime and simply may not provide enough time for hospice to help alleviate symptoms Palliative care services are more common in hospitals where palliative care programs have tripled since 2000 8 but most of the course of a terminal illness takes place outside of the hospital Many patients may not have consistent access to palliative services known to be effective in promoting symptomatic relief Effective treatments exist for many end of life symptoms but there are significant gaps in their delivery 9 10 Interventions may not be reaching the right patients in the right ways In summary the prevalence of many end of life symptoms remains unacceptably and disappointingly high in light of active efforts to improve end of life care Some best practices simply are not being followed Some choices are not being adequately explained and offered to patients and the family caregivers supporting them Aligning current care with best practices represents a promising way to harvest low hanging fruit in order to reverse these negative trends and reduce end of life symptom burden for millions of Americans But beyond that the trends characterized in the Annals study must be parsed further in order to identify better and more coordinated ways to organize and deliver high quality end of life symptom management Footnotes References 1 Approaching death Improving care at the end of life Washington D C Institute of Medicine 1997 2 Walling A M Asch S M Lorenz K A et al The quality of care provided to hospitalized patients at the end of life Arch Intern

    Original URL path: http://medicaring.org/tag/adam-singer/ (2016-04-30)
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  • Beyond Hospice: End-of-Life Care for the 21st Century – MediCaring.org
    as well as the need for help in coping with exacerbations decline and uncertainty and frailty the path endured by people with advanced old age with or without dementia and their families which usually requires a few years of ongoing support medical treatment and caregiver help The Medicare hospice model works well for people on the fairly predictable and short first trajectory For those on the other two paths it proves problematic for both patients and providers Late last year The Washington Post ran an article describing some of those problems particularly among patients who have heart disease or dementia outlive their prognosis and need hospice like services for years not weeks The article Hospice Firms Draining Millions from Medicare described the problem of hospice survivors meaning people discharged alive from hospice who were supposed to have died The Post reported that hospices have a financial incentive to enroll healthier people for longer lengths of stay Hospices are paid about 150 per day per patient in routine care regardless of the services actually delivered that day This payment structure creates an incentive for hospice to enroll people who will probably have a number of days in hospice in which few services are needed which means they have an incentive to enroll people in the latter two trajectories The article generated a firestorm of responses and controversy including more than 800 comments on the Post s website and a three part response featured on http www pallimed org a popular hospice and palliative medicine blog A week after the Post article ran Paula Span of The New Old Age wrote Bounced from Hospice describing the plight of an 84 year old Pennsylvania woman who was eventually bumped from hospice eligibility because she was no longer losing weight or declining so the services that hospice had offered and her family valued including companionship feeding and bathing ended Many advocates suggest that palliative care offers the bridge people need designed to offer supportive care to people living with serious and advanced illness and disease Palliative care would aim to provide symptom relief and management while working in tandem with providers focused on ongoing interventions to prolong life It would also coordinate multidisciplinary care including services from social workers physical therapists and more For now the challenge remains that most palliative care programs are hospital based subject to and limited by what insurers and Medicare will pay Meeting those needs really requires that we really explore and understand what it means to be very old and very sick and the specific needs preferences and challenges that people face My friend for instance now needs someone with her 24 7 as she is no longer safe by herself This is a short term situation and her family can string together round the clock coverage for now But if her need were to persist for many months or years stringing it together would become impossible In our current system most likely she would end up in

    Original URL path: http://medicaring.org/2014/02/12/beyond-hospice-end-of-life-care-for-the-21st-century/ (2016-04-30)
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  • End-of-Life Lessons from an Unlikely Source: Jumpy the Hamster – MediCaring.org
    the newsletter of the American Society for Aging printed my reflections on what happened to Jumpy and what we could all learn from the compassionate care his vet provided You can view the article by following the link below Jumpy the Hamster key words End of life care American Society on Aging palliative care quality improvement Tweet Pin It Leave a Reply Cancel reply Your Comment You may use these HTML tags and attributes a href title abbr title acronym title b blockquote cite cite code del datetime em i q cite s strike strong Name required E mail required URI January 14 deadline for comments on Meaningful Use Stage 3 Great Ideas Wanted Academy for Healthcare Improvement Wants to Hear From You MediCaring is a service of the Center for Elder Care and Advanced Illness at Altarum Institute Follow Us To receive our email newsletter send a request to email protected Tweets by medicaring Care Transitions News Ringling Bros circus elephants set for final act Sunday USA TODAY April 29 2016 PMH announces Annette Schnabel as president CEO Bureau County Republican April 29 2016 College baseball Weekend Preview April 29 May 1 NCAA com April 29 2016 AbbVie Doubles Down on M A Bloomberg April 29 2016 Aspen Valley Hospital reaps awards for patient experience Aspen Times April 29 2016 Optimizing care transitions the role of the community pharmacist Dove Medical Press April 26 2016 3 lessons to improve patient care transitions FierceHealthcare April 21 2016 Dave Alfano Launches Caring Transitions of Central Connecticut PR Web press release April 19 2016 Older adults with dementia face increased mortality risk due to care transitions Bel Marra Health April 14 2016 Central Wyoming Caring Transitions Owners Recognized for Pioneer Spirit PR Web press release April 4 2016 Tags advance care planning

    Original URL path: http://medicaring.org/2013/01/31/end-of-life-lessons-from-an-unlikely-source-jumpy-the-hamster-2/ (2016-04-30)
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  • provider training; american society on aging – MediCaring.org
    vet provided You can view the article by following the link below Jumpy the Hamster key words End of life care American Society on Aging palliative care quality improvement MediCaring is a service of the Center for Elder Care and Advanced Illness at Altarum Institute Follow Us To receive our email newsletter send a request to email protected Tweets by medicaring Care Transitions News Ringling Bros circus elephants set for final act Sunday USA TODAY April 29 2016 PMH announces Annette Schnabel as president CEO Bureau County Republican April 29 2016 College baseball Weekend Preview April 29 May 1 NCAA com April 29 2016 AbbVie Doubles Down on M A Bloomberg April 29 2016 Aspen Valley Hospital reaps awards for patient experience Aspen Times April 29 2016 Optimizing care transitions the role of the community pharmacist Dove Medical Press April 26 2016 3 lessons to improve patient care transitions FierceHealthcare April 21 2016 Dave Alfano Launches Caring Transitions of Central Connecticut PR Web press release April 19 2016 Older adults with dementia face increased mortality risk due to care transitions Bel Marra Health April 14 2016 Central Wyoming Caring Transitions Owners Recognized for Pioneer Spirit PR Web press release April

    Original URL path: http://medicaring.org/tag/provider-training-american-society-on-aging/ (2016-04-30)
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  • Prevention Magazine Talks about Dying and Grief – MediCaring.org
    someone who is not likely to recover from his or her disease Among our tips are these Instead of saying Dad you are going to be just fine try saying Dad are there some things that worry you Instead of Don t talk like that You can beat this try It must be hard to come to terms with all this Instead of I just can t talk about this try I am feeling a little overwhelmed right now Can we take this up later tonight And instead of Please don t give up I need you here say I need you here I will miss you terribly But we will get through somehow Like Halpert s article the book offers a list of things we typically say things that wind up being unhelpful and even hurtful Acknowledging and communicating about life s passages is an essential part of what makes us human Kudos to Prevention magazine for taking a step in this direction According to Halpert s blog she spent years trying to find an editor willing to grapple with this story We are glad that she found one key words end of life communications dying grief Tweet Pin It Leave a Reply Cancel reply Your Comment You may use these HTML tags and attributes a href title abbr title acronym title b blockquote cite cite code del datetime em i q cite s strike strong Name required E mail required URI Award for Handbook for Mortals Celebrating National Family Caregivers Month MediCaring is a service of the Center for Elder Care and Advanced Illness at Altarum Institute Follow Us To receive our email newsletter send a request to email protected Tweets by medicaring Care Transitions News Ringling Bros circus elephants set for final act Sunday USA TODAY April

    Original URL path: http://medicaring.org/2012/10/19/prevention-magazine-talks-about-dying-and-grief/ (2016-04-30)
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  • death and dying – MediCaring.org
    needed to get through tough times and situations In particular we offer words to use when talking with a very sick person someone who is not likely to recover from his or her disease Among our tips are these Instead of saying Dad you are going to be just fine try saying Dad are there some things that worry you Instead of Don t talk like that You can beat this try It must be hard to come to terms with all this Instead of I just can t talk about this try I am feeling a little overwhelmed right now Can we take this up later tonight And instead of Please don t give up I need you here say I need you here I will miss you terribly But we will get through somehow Like Halpert s article the book offers a list of things we typically say things that wind up being unhelpful and even hurtful Acknowledging and communicating about life s passages is an essential part of what makes us human Kudos to Prevention magazine for taking a step in this direction According to Halpert s blog she spent years trying to find an editor willing to grapple with this story We are glad that she found one key words end of life communications dying grief MediCaring is a service of the Center for Elder Care and Advanced Illness at Altarum Institute Follow Us To receive our email newsletter send a request to email protected Tweets by medicaring Care Transitions News Ringling Bros circus elephants set for final act Sunday USA TODAY April 29 2016 PMH announces Annette Schnabel as president CEO Bureau County Republican April 29 2016 College baseball Weekend Preview April 29 May 1 NCAA com April 29 2016 AbbVie Doubles Down on M

    Original URL path: http://medicaring.org/tag/death-and-dying/ (2016-04-30)
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  • Award for Handbook for Mortals – MediCaring.org
    You may use these HTML tags and attributes a href title abbr title acronym title b blockquote cite cite code del datetime em i q cite s strike strong Name required E mail required URI Family Caregivers Doing More Than Ever Results from New UHF AARP Study Shed Light Prevention Magazine Talks about Dying and Grief MediCaring is a service of the Center for Elder Care and Advanced Illness at Altarum Institute Follow Us To receive our email newsletter send a request to email protected Tweets by medicaring Care Transitions News Ringling Bros circus elephants set for final act Sunday USA TODAY April 29 2016 PMH announces Annette Schnabel as president CEO Bureau County Republican April 29 2016 College baseball Weekend Preview April 29 May 1 NCAA com April 29 2016 AbbVie Doubles Down on M A Bloomberg April 29 2016 Aspen Valley Hospital reaps awards for patient experience Aspen Times April 29 2016 Optimizing care transitions the role of the community pharmacist Dove Medical Press April 26 2016 3 lessons to improve patient care transitions FierceHealthcare April 21 2016 Dave Alfano Launches Caring Transitions of Central Connecticut PR Web press release April 19 2016 Older adults with dementia face

    Original URL path: http://medicaring.org/2012/10/05/award-for-handbook-for-mortals/ (2016-04-30)
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