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  • Urgently Needed Medications and Supplies
    helped by bringing medications with them and sometimes they were the only suppliers of important medications like oxytocin and misoprostol Last year the hospital s stock of medications improved and we stopped asking volunteers to bring medications with them Unfortunately the hospital is again in dire need of basic medications for the maternity wards If you are able to obtain medications or medical supplies from a hospital pharmacy pharmaceutical company or other source please consider bringing those supplies with you To prevent problems with customs at the airport in Port au Prince print this letter we can also email it to you if you prefer from the medical director at St Therese Hospital giving you permission to bring medications into the country Make sure the medications have not expired as no letter will help if they are out of date The medications most in need are Oxytocin Magnesium Sulfate Lidocaine 1 Lidocaine 2 Bupivacaine Spinal Lidocaine Spinal Hydralazine Lasix Ampicillin IV Gentamicin IV Metronidazole IV Ceftriaxone IM Nitrofurantoin Cephalexin IV or oral Ampicillin oral Metronidazole oral Nystatin Absorbable suture with needle preferably 2 0 and 3 0 vicryl and also 0 Those in bold are top priority Again if you are bringing any of the above medications in your luggage it is essential that you print this letter and bring it with you to get everything through customs We also need medical supplies This is what we need most Sterile and non sterile gloves Gauze 4 X 4 Syringes 10cc 20cc Needles for injection 18g 20g 22g IV catheters 16g 18g 20g IV start kits IV administration kits IV adapters Foley catheters Urinary collection bags Nitrazine paper Bed sheets Baby clothing Receiving blankets Onesies One medication that cannot be bought in Haiti is misoprostol We need it to treat women

    Original URL path: https://www.midwivesforhaiti.org/urgently-needed-medications-and-supplies.html (2016-04-29)
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  • travel alert practice enhanced precautions to women pregnant in any trimester or who are trying to become pregnant to avoid traveling to regions where Zika has been found This includes Haiti An infant with microcephaly Source New York Times Zika was first reported in Brazil in May 2015 and more than 3 500 microcephaly cases were reported there between October 2015 and January 2016 Brazil typically reports 150 cases of microcephaly annually Some of the infants have died The C D C says The full spectrum of outcomes that might be associated with infection during pregnancy and the factors that might increase risk to the fetus are not yet fully understood Cases of the Z ika virus have been confirmed in the continental United States but all occurrences were in travelers who have returned from affected regions and no local transmissions were found The first baby born with microcephaly in the United States to a mother who had Zika in Brazil recently occurred in Hawaii We are obvisously very concerned for pregnant women and their babies in Haiti Midwives For Haiti takes the health of our staff and volunteers very seriously If you are planning a 2016 trip with us

    Original URL path: https://www.midwivesforhaiti.org/easyblog/entry/zika-virus-in-haiti.html?tmpl=component&print=1&format=print (2016-04-29)
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  • "Thoughts on above, feet on the ground." by Nadene Brunk
    girls do not stay in school or have to move to the city to get further education Recently on a Sunday morning at the church I attend in Haiti the young women s choir was singing a song that included the chorus Thoughts on above feet on the ground I thought about the girls who were singing in much the same way I thought about this girl What lies ahead for them When they hope for the future what do they have to hope for I wondered as the Haitians sang if they do not have a better understanding of feet on the ground than we Americans do We manage to escape from the more difficult things of life like hunger lack of clean water washing clothing in the river bucket baths dirt floors and no educational opportunities or hope for better times ahead Instead we comfort ourselves with our food our drink our clean and lovely floors our modern kitchens our heated and cooled cars workplaces and homes We live in constant denial of our own death the death of our loved ones and the misery that most of the rest of the world deals with daily We watch TV and read Facebook and constantly escape in computer land so we can forget that life is fragile and precious My work in Haiti is as necessary to my spiritual being as it is to the Haitians our program serves It keeps my feet on the ground and better prepares me for facing the hard things in life The fact that I was born in the U S instead of in Haiti is an undeserved gift Those of us who can easily keep our thoughts on above because we are so physically comfortable owe it to the majority of the

    Original URL path: https://www.midwivesforhaiti.org/easyblog/entry/thoughts-on-above-feet-on-the-ground.html (2016-04-29)
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  • A Remote Prenatal Clinic Baby is Born - By Alice Hirata, MD
    bring their skills compassion and medical supplies to this prenatal clinic which will serve over a hundred women Along for the day s clinic is Brena Genise a young enthusiastic student in the 7 th Midwives for Haiti class Classes began only three months ago Today she s learning the fundamentals of the mobile prenatal clinic to bring monthly comprehensive prenatal care vitamins and necessary medications to twenty remote villages surrounding Hinche Clinic begins An SBA gives a brief informative talk to the gathered women charts are handed out blood pressures and weights obtained Brena s preceptor has her eye on a woman and she asks Brena to evaluate the lady She s due to deliver her third baby and reports passing fluid this morning Seeking to examine the woman Brena realizes the clinic s wooden bed has a dirty ripped mattress certainly not ideal for a possible birth Quickly the portable exam table is opened an exam is performed and the woman is found not to have broken her bag of water but to be in early labor Her history and vitals are reassuring so she is offered water and juice She s encouraged to walk Two hours later the woman seeks aid She has the urge to push and indeed her exam confirms its time to deliver Brena gently supports the woman s back as she lays on her side on the portable exam table She begins to push After only ten minutes her bag of water breaks thick meconium is noted With the guidance of her preceptor Brena carefully delivers a gorgeous healthy little boy He has a lusty cry and the meconium is quickly cleared from his nose and mouth A placenta is safely delivered intact uterine massage and Pitocin given Both mom and baby are

    Original URL path: https://www.midwivesforhaiti.org/easyblog/entry/a-remote-prenatal-clinic-baby-is-born-by-alice-hirata-md.html (2016-04-29)
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  • A Hard Reality. By Maria Iorillo.
    have expected a 9 th timer to be an old pro Anyway the baby came But it didn t breath There was meconium staining and the student midwife on staff was slow and clunky with her aspiration of the baby s nose and mouth As I saw that the baby was not breathing I asked for the ambu bag and began the resuscitation The baby was still unresponsive and apneic not breathing Within a minute we had also begun chest compressions because the baby s heart rate was low Cathy did the first shift of chest compressions as I bagged the baby I began the mantra of neonatal resuscitation One and two and three and breath and one and two and three and breathe and Over and over The baby a little boy was not responding He most likely had meconium in his lungs and the ultimately quick delivery did not allow for enough squeeze to get it all out Most people believe now that meconium aspiration is the result of an in utero distress In the U S we deal with it often in the NICU and the babies live This little guy though was not going to have that advantage We resuscitated him for 30 minutes which is a long time for that kind of thing He was finally breathing on his own but he never took a full cry and he had the rhythmic agonal gasping of one who is desperately trying to receive air Miss Genette offered that we could try to find a pediatric doctor to help I thought that was a great idea and so I carried him out of the maternity ward and across the courtyard to the largely ill equipped pediatric unit The baby boy was breathing on his own but was still limp and unresponsive Cathy and I would continued ventilating him with the ambu bag which seemed to be offering him more support Miraculously the doctor somehow came up with an oxygen machine So we put a nasal cannula on the baby and observed He definitely seemed to be doing better with the oxygen but I still felt that this baby needed more care Could we transfer him to Paul Farmer s hospital 45 minutes away in Cange The doctor agreed that this was a good idea and said that he would make the arrangements I left the hospital about an hour and a half after this birth having stayed with the baby the whole time I felt that he was doing a little better He had a little better muscle tone but he still hadn t cried and most of the time his eyes were closed He was receiving the oxygen and was now under the care of the pediatrician I was adamant with them that this baby needed to be watched carefully until he was transferred to Cange Miss Genette left the hospital 3 hours later and the baby still had not left yet The next morning back

    Original URL path: https://www.midwivesforhaiti.org/easyblog/entry/a-hard-reality-by-maria-iorillo.html (2016-04-29)
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  • That causes more ripples than just spending a week in the country as a midwife Kristin Johnson MFH is what a true mission program should be It empowers the Haitians to change their world While saving lives of mothers and decreasing orphans it provides income respect pride education and is totally Haitian centered In 1 week you see Haiti in a way few can eat Haitian food develop great relationships and it can be done if you only have a bit more than a week off work Midwives have a hard time getting away This is a get away you can do Patricia Haroldson MFH is making a difference in the lives of the women and babies in Haiti I love this organization and what it stands for in teaching and putting skilled birth attendants in Haiti Once you become part of the mission and vision you will become addicted Truth Vida Kent I m a many times volunteer Two things led me to choose MFH for my volunteer resources Haitians are trained to care for their own communities and volunteers kept going back I wanted to be a part of something that midwives wanted to return to continue the work and that would be self sustaining in the end Midwives for Haiti accomplishes both Bobbi Kimsey Ok you re signed up and excited maybe a little nervous Now what Here are some tips to prepare yourself Come without expectations and prepare to be very flexible Emily Tinsley Respect listen be willing to sweat Universally women who are pregnant or in labor all speak the same language Vida Kent Expect the unexpected and understand that the world you will be entering is as removed from your daily experience as that on Mars Don t judge don t try to impose your own norms and don t think that you will be changing things in any way other than by saving one life at a time BD Colen Take creole lessons bring small US money carry all the instruments you need on you consider donating wish list items if possible like Doppler Go for walks during the day enjoy this unique experience Jacquelyn Aurora While working I carry my own gloves some cytotec ibuprofen sanitizer chux magnesium and syringes to give IM treats for kids water bottle wet wipes Some emergencies come in and drug cabinet locked so I have my meds in pocket I brought an old apron that I wore Dollar bills for a Coke at roadside stands near house Rita Ledbetter Give in to the experience and you will be enriched Candace Duran Bring three times more bug spray than you think you need Suzi Saunders When I travel anywhere I carry a small cache of essentials water bottle nuts dried fruit hand sanitizer and pocket kleenex And earplugs for the night These take care of the basics And listen observe smile Cheryl Hanna Truscott Bring respect and listen It is a different culture so figure out how

    Original URL path: https://www.midwivesforhaiti.org/easyblog/entry/volunteer-advice.html?tmpl=component&print=1&format=print (2016-04-29)
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  • Notes From A Volunteer Midwife in Haiti
    in lactation and working as a doula childbirth education health educator at hospitals And it got to the point where I realized that helping women try to get the kind of the care they wanted was an impossible task it would just be a lot easier to be that person giving the good care After I gave birth to my last daughter in 2007 I started training to be a midwife started taking a course and I was certified in 2013 I have a very small home birth practice in a remote place Kodiak Island off the coast of Alaska I may be the most remote midwife in the United States most likely Its nine hours by ferry to get to the mainland And that s not to the big city that s just to the mainland and from there you have to drive five hours to get to Anchorage And with all the stops it takes to get there it takes about 24 hours to get to Ancho rage from where I live I d had some friends who had gone to Cap Haïtien and some other friends who had come to Midwives for Haiti and blogged extensively about it So they were the inspiration and especially the thing I noticed is when they came down they would always go back I don t know anybody who has only been once So that to me is a good sign The midwives at the hospital taught me a ton of stuff too Because I m not used to high risk So when someone comes in seizing I got to watch them manage situations with grace and no doctors in sight It was very inspiring It was very humbling for me if anything Because the women were so strong The birthing

    Original URL path: https://www.midwivesforhaiti.org/easyblog/entry/notes-from-a-volunteer-midwife-in-haiti.html (2016-04-29)
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  • "Holy Moments" by Vanessa Fowlkes, FNP
    our planned destination was too high This happens a lot in Haiti so doing clinics by a river or under a tree in a pasture are unplanned glitches that I have grown to look forward to At the end of this particular day when clinic was over I thought I happened to be standing by the river fascinated as I watched people crossing on their horses or motorcycles or just wading through on foot On the opposite bank a middle aged woman approached with an infant bundled in a blanket She waded into the water and headed our way with the infant held high against her chest Mid way across she began speaking to the interpreter that I was standing with and they chatted back and forth for a minute as she completed her crossing and continued up the hill I don t speak the language so I didn t understand the conversation He and I eventually made our way back to the clinic and walked back into the church to find this same woman inside She wanted her grandchild to be seen for the diarrhea the baby was experiencing Diarrhea not an uncommon complaint in worried parents either in Haiti or in the United States Pretty routine right Unbeknownst to us all The Moment had arrived The baby s mother had died suddenly the week before when her daughter was only 3 weeks old All the grandmother knew about the death was that the mother had a big headache and then just died Not a common occurrence in my country but not something a Haitian would question Life can be hard here I was getting my stethoscope to do a quick exam on the baby when I was asked by one of our interpreters Bengie if it was okay for Isabelle to nurse the baby Isabelle has a baby of her own and she had plenty of breast milk to share Of course I gave my okay although I didn t really think it was my decision to make The decision was Isabelle s and the choice that she made was to give of herself to this baby who had nothing and in so doing she made a choice that turned out to be a gift to us all We all watched as she nursed the baby who hungrily latched on I was just starting to realize that this was The Moment when suddenly I noticed Isabelle s tears running down her face and falling on her breasts It was a moment within a moment In this country where life can be brutally tough and death is commonplace I had thought that a Haitian might be immune to this kind of tragedy But I was wrong Even though Isabelle was able to provide this meal she knew that there were many more meals for this helpless child that she will probably go without The brevity of this moment was lost on no one not me not my team not

    Original URL path: https://www.midwivesforhaiti.org/easyblog/entry/holy-moments-by-vanessa-fowlkes-fnp.html (2016-04-29)
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