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  • Why Skilled Birth Attendants Matter by Nadene Brunk
    it can happen to anyone It kills about a million babies each year in this world 2 A piece of the placenta remains in the uterus This only happens about 4 of the time but can be a cause of heavy bleeding and can happen to anyone 3 The uterus can bleed too much after birth by not contracting well on its own It is more common if a piece of the placenta remained inside but it can happen to anyone even if the placenta was completely expelled 4 The baby s shoulders can get stuck in the pelvic bones This is more common with big babies but can also happen to anyone 5 The baby s cord could prolapse or come out in front of the head It is more common when the bag of water is broken artificially but it can happen to anyone 6 You can get an infection In even the cleanest of situations there are bacteria that you can be exposed to during birth 7 The baby could be stressed by the labor and not get enough oxygen This is more common if the placenta is not healthy but can happen with even healthy placentas 8 The baby could be in a position that makes it difficult to exit the pelvis well and labor could go very long 9 The uterus could invert turn inside out while the baby is coming out It is pretty rare but sometimes happens to women who have had a lot of babies 10 The placenta could be retained and not come out at all This may be because of conditions where it grows into the wall of the uterus or just will not detach on its own for some reason These complications can happen to anyone anytime and anywhere in the world Whether one chooses to birth at home at a birth center or in a hospital having a skilled birth attendant has been proven to make the difference between life and death for mothers and babies However if you are a woman in a rural village in the 72 countries of this world and do not have a skilled attendant equipped to respond to these emergencies here s what can happen in those ten situations 1 The baby could die 2 You could bleed to death 3 You could bleed to death 4 The baby could die 5 The baby could die 6 You could die 7 The baby could die 8 Your labor could be so long you and your baby could die 9 You could bleed to death 10 You could bleed to death So every two minutes in this world a woman is dying from preventable causes related to pregnancy or childbirth 99 of these deaths occur in developing countries And the babies more die on the first day of their life than at any other time At least 114 died in the hour I wrote this the majority from preventable causes that a skilled

    Original URL path: https://www.midwivesforhaiti.org/easyblog/entry/why-skilled-attendance-matters-by-nadene-brunk.html (2016-04-29)
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  • Tags
    Midwives For Haiti 7130 Glen Forest Drive Richmond Virginia 23226 United States http www midwivesforhaiti org permission to email you You may unsubscribe via the link found at the bottom of every email See our Email Privacy Policy for details Emails are serviced by Constant Contact Midwives For Haiti Blog Information from Midwives For Haiti Navigation Home Categories Tags Bloggers Archived Posts Calendar Subscribe to blog Login Username Password Forgot Password Remember me Login Search Sort by Title Tag Weight birth 8 birth center 2 breastfeeding 3 Carrie Wortham 3 chikungunya fever 1 earthquake 1 education 7 everynewborn 4 frontier nursing university 1 haiti 34 hope 3 hospital 2 IDM2015 1 infant 2 infant health 3 lactation consultant 1 maternal health 22 midwife 10 midwifery 1 midwives 12 mobile clinic 6 mosquito 1 mother 2 mothers 6 mothers day 1 newborn 5 NoCeilings 1 nurse 2 nurses week 1 photography 1 pregnancy 1 prenatal care 1 projectpostnatal 1 rural 1 skilled birth attendant 5 students 1 traditional midwife 1 valentine s day 1 volunteer 3 volunteers 1 women 5 women s health 2 world breastfeeding week 1 zika 1 zika virus 1 div uk panel data uk grid margin Tweet

    Original URL path: https://www.midwivesforhaiti.org/easyblog/tags.html?ordering=title&sorting=asc (2016-04-29)
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  • breastfeeding
    adopted that baby as she has 2 others right there on the spot Thank you Isabelle and Bengie for reminding me why I come to Haiti I left this holy moment as I leave all others happy to have been in Haiti privileged to have had this experience and already planning my next trip The medical team present committed to supplying the baby with ten months of formula and we are ensuring the family has a clean water supply You can also help us support mother and babies in Haiti by making a tax deductible donation to our programs Tags mothers haiti everynewborn breastfeeding birth 0 Continue reading 2781 Hits 0 Comments Nov 20 Saving Lives Providing Respectful Postnatal Care to Mothers and Newborns in Haiti Midwives For Haiti From Our Staff Women need skilled care before during and after delivery In developing countries like Haiti postnatal care programs are often the weakest of all reproductive and child health programs Lack of postnatal care contributes up to half of all preventable maternal and newborn deaths Hospital Ste Therese is the public referral hospital in the Central Plateau About two hundred women give birth here monthly and in 2013 only 1 received postnatal care Without the resources or funding to provide this care many mothers and newborns died needlessly In July 2014 in partnership with Hospital Ste Therese Midwives for Haiti launched the Postnatal Care Program Two skilled birth attendants were selected and thoroughly trained patient sheets were drafted and logbooks were created From the first day data was collected Six days a week the midwives work from 8am 4pm They see as many patients as they can on the hospital floor and at an out patient clinic two days a week Within three months these two midwives have provided care to 894 women and infants increasing access to postnatal care at the hospital from 1 to 65 If you ask Juslene or Illa the Postnatal Care Team they will tell you countless stories of women who narrowly avoided dying from preeclampsia or who were kept several days longer in the hospital because of anemia or an infection They will tell you how much time they spend with mothers to dispel the cultural belief that they don t nurse well the first few days after delivery They make sure mothers are educated about the benefits of colostrum and how important it is nurse frequently They will tell you about the newborns they have referred for special care or treated for infection They will tell you how many mothers come back before their 1 week follow up appointment because they now know that a high temperature of their baby or themselves is a danger sign They will not only tell you these stories with pride in their voice but they will show you Follow them on their rounds and they will introduce you to the woman who they discovered hemorrhaging alone on her bed hours after she delivered They will show you

    Original URL path: https://www.midwivesforhaiti.org/easyblog/tags/breastfeeding.html (2016-04-29)
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  • chikungunya fever
    I knew I was going I made sure I took every effort to protect myself from mosquitoes I decided to take enough scrubs to cover the days I would be there so I would have something long to wear I treated most of my clothes with Permethrin and packed them in plastic bags I bought five bottles of deep woods Off as well as Off towelettes that I could keep in my carry on I headed to Haiti as scheduled on July 18th loaded down with lots of donated supplies and a generator part that piqued the interest of TSA And all that DEET When I arrived in PAP I went directly to the bathroom and applied bug repellent via the towelettes I stayed in PAP that night at the Heartline Guesthouse It took me about 20 minutes in the PAP heat to decide there was no way I was going to wear the long clothes I changed into capris and a t shirt and sprayed myself with Off One of the volunteers at the Guesthouse a young man in his early 20s had been in PAP for 4 weeks and did not use bug spray at all He had not gotten Chik V at that point I had to stop myself from going Mommy on him I slathered myself liberally with the Off several times that day and just before I went to bed I slept under a mosquito net with a fan blowing on me The Chik V mosquitoes bite during the day but I wasn t taking chances I took Off to the bathroom when I showered and sprayed the drain and screens before I turned it on I sprayed myself as soon as I dried off and sprayed again when I got dressed so I could get all the cuffs The other volunteer that traveled with me the next day from PAP to Hinche Kel was just as diligent with the bug spray as me I think every Haitian we met had had Chik V Even young people were massaging their wrists and complaining about pain Kel and I decided not to be embarrassed by the amount of spray we used or how often we applied it She used Picaridin while I continued to use Off several times daily and at bedtime We talked with Emily and Rebecca at the MFH house They had both had it Emily a mild case and Rebecca a more serious case with relapses They talked to us about avoiding mosquitoes when they were most active during sunrise and sunset and using the bug spray and fans We did not actually see many mosquitoes They were most active at sunrise and sunset as we were told We saw the most when we were in Hinche at a continuing education session for the Matròns which was absolutely fabulous We passed our towelettes back and forth throughout the session All in all I do not think I was bit at all I was

    Original URL path: https://www.midwivesforhaiti.org/easyblog/tags/chikungunya-fever.html (2016-04-29)
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  • everynewborn
    as she has 2 others right there on the spot Thank you Isabelle and Bengie for reminding me why I come to Haiti I left this holy moment as I leave all others happy to have been in Haiti privileged to have had this experience and already planning my next trip The medical team present committed to supplying the baby with ten months of formula and we are ensuring the family has a clean water supply You can also help us support mother and babies in Haiti by making a tax deductible donation to our programs Tags mothers haiti everynewborn breastfeeding birth 0 Continue reading 2781 Hits 0 Comments May 12 Solutions that Work Bringing Maternal Care to Rural Women in Haiti Midwives For Haiti From Our Staff Each day 800 mothers in the world die from mostly preventable causes during pregnancy or childbirth and 99 of these deaths occur in developing countries In other words it is mostly the poorest women in the world who die from causes that we know how to prevent In Haiti where the maternal and infant mortality rates are highest in the Western Hemisphere mothers face three critical barriers to maternal care lack of prenatal care lack of transportation and lack of skilled birth attendants These barriers are acutely critical for rural women Midwives For Haiti s Mobile Prenatal Clinic address all three The Mobile Prenatal Clinic visits twenty remote villages in the Central Plateau of Haiti The midwives carry their supplies and medications in old suitcases which are strapped atop an all terrain vehicle and travel up to two hours over rutted roads rivers and streams to reach the women who would otherwise not have access to care The team sets up in churches schools community buildings or sometimes under a tree and gets to work while expecting and newly delivered mothers wait patiently for the health care they know will make a difference for themselves and their babies surviving childbirth or not Every Haitian mother knows a woman who has died from pregnancy or birth complications Magdala Jean a graduate of Midwives For Haiti who now works on the mobile clinic says Too many women are dying in birth My cousin died because of eclampsia a treatable complication I want women to have loving care and support In Haiti the focus is on survival and hope that mother and baby will live through the many complications that are brought on by poor nutrition malaria worms early hypertension lack of prenatal care lack of transportation and a lack of skilled birth attendants By bringing comprehensive prenatal and postnatal care to rural women by skilled compassionate providers all graduates of Midwives For Haiti s training program the Mobile Prenatal Clinic closes a critical gap in care for very poor women This care includes providing vitamins and iron supplements maternal and fetal health assessment lab testing and treatment for anemia worms malaria sexually transmitted infections and referrals for HIV Mothers also receive extensive education on the importance of nutrition breastfeeding danger signs of pregnancy and when to seek help Every woman receives a chart and her health is followed throughout her pregnancy Very ill mothers receive emergency transport to a medical facility The project is working The Mobile Prenatal Clinic provides over 6 000 patient visits annually Last year alone the midwives transported 25 mothers for life saving emergency medical care For the rural women of these 20 remote villages the care these traveling midwives provide can literally mean the difference between life and death We know how to end preventable deaths of rural mothers and babies We know that it costs money to bring maternal care to these women It costs 10 per patient visit to run these clinics in rural Haiti With solutions like this it is no longer a question of how but why When we hear the statistic that 800 mothers die each day while bringing life into the world we must remember that it is mostly rural poor women who are dying And we need to ask ourselves are the lives of these women worth saving Midwives For Haiti has answered with a resounding Yes Midwives For Haiti relies on private donations to keep the Mobile Prenatal Clinic on the road all year round Make a tax deductible donation by May 29 to help them earn a matching grant and cover the annual cost of this life saving project Each dollar donated will be matched please give now Tags mothers mobile clinic maternal health haiti everynewborn 0 Continue reading 2842 Hits 0 Comments Mar 18 No Ceilings For Midwives For Haiti Midwives For Haiti From Our Staff On March 9 2015 our fabulous midwife and instructor Genette Thelusmond was invited to New York City by the Clinton Foundation to present a speech on maternal health at the launch of No Ceilings Not There Yet A Data Driven Analysis of Gender Equality Our Directors Nadene Brunk and Dr Steve Eads along with fellow midwife Magdala Jean accompanied Genette It was a fabulous honor and exciting event Genette shared the stage with Hillary Clinton Chelsea Clinton Melinda Gates and a dozen or so other amazing women and men including the Honorable Presidents of Croatia and Liberia along with Nobel Prize winner Malala Yousafzai via Skype to bring 20 years of data to life Maternal health was the first data point explored Over the past two decades maternal mortality has decreased by 40 across the world Chelsea Clinton said But we can t mistake progress for success Despite those gains progress has been uneven particularly among poor rural and marginalized women including right here in the U S Chelsea introduced Genette and said Many of the critical investments that have helped ensure that women and girls are leading longer healthier lives have been made in skilled birth attendants and midwives Midwives just like Genette Thelusmond of Midwives For Haiti whose remarkable care has helped generations of Haitians be born safely and to grow

    Original URL path: https://www.midwivesforhaiti.org/easyblog/tags/everynewborn.html (2016-04-29)
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  • frontier nursing university
    clinic midwives Four of them ride our aging pink Jeep to sixteen villages around the central as far away as a 2 hour drive delivering skilled midwifery care to over 500 women each month They received 4 of the bags The other two bags went to Illa and Juslene the two midwives that Rebecca trained last summer to do thorough assessments of mothers and babies before they leave the hospital here in Hinche Putting the bags in the hands of midwives seemed to bring Mary Breckenridge s vision back to us and I really wanted to get a picture of a Haitan baby in one of those bags We had a professional photographer here for just a few days and the morning before he left we asked him if he could help us get that photo BD Colen said he would do it so we showed him the Frontier picture We decided that for various reasons going to the hospital to take photos was not wise or practical and that bringing a woman and her baby to us was reasonable as we could provide the vehicle to bring them to the house We called Illa and Juslene and asked if there was anyone ready to go home that would consent to coming here and having their baby s photo taken They called back soon and said Yes come and get the mother and baby When they arrived at the house and Illa helped the very young mother out of the van she said to us She s a little embarrassed to come because she has no clothes The grandmother was carrying the baby while the mother climbed out of the van holding onto a brown towel wrapped around her body She had a green blouse on and that towel nothing else And she was reluctant to sit because of course having just had a baby the back of the towel was bloody Haitian women frequently come to the hospital with the only nice outfit they have get the dress or nightgown or skirt soiled during the birth process put the soiled things in a bucket to take home and wait for family members to bring them something to wear home on the back of the motorcycle They use multiple rags in their limited supply of underwear to keep themselves from soiling everything the lie on or sit on These rags do not get tossed No they get taken home to get washed in a bucket to be cleaned and dried and reused over and over This mama s skirt was in a bucket back at the hospital We have a house full of women and all of us swung into action Kelah Hatcher the daughter of a CPM volunteer offered a pair of underwear and in that we put a blue surgical towel for padding I went upstairs to my still unpacked bags and found a blue and white shift I had bought and because sending it back when it

    Original URL path: https://www.midwivesforhaiti.org/easyblog/tags/frontier-nursing-university.html (2016-04-29)
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  • hope
    laughed with me at that I was puzzled at his presence Why are you here Obviously you are not pregnant He laughed at this He responded saying I am here to be a guest Okaaaay I wondered why in the world a 15 year old boy would come here to hang out to watch pregnant women and busy midwives meander around in the hot sun as if it were entertaining Very puzzling to me but I shrugged and went about my business smiling at the oddity The mild morning warmth quickly stretched into the blazing afternoon and the steady stream of patients became just a few remaining One of the last remaining patients got up on the exam table Bonjou My name is Tara I m a midwife As I began to talk I instinctively put my hands on her belly feeling as I spoke Her soft stretched gravid belly reminds me of a momma who has carried 10 babies within her throughout her life What baby is this for you It is my 4th It creeps into my mind she is expecting her 4th baby just like me We are two women in the same phase of life She is like me I am like her Yet so far How are you feeling OK she responds after my translator has translated what I have said to her When are you due I ask April she says Is your baby active Yes Do you have any complaints headaches Yes she says I have had a headache for 3 weeks Hmmm Are you having any visual disturbances Yes I have been seeing spots for 3 weeks she tells me What was her blood pressure I ask Pleasure my interpreter He rummages through the paperwork I ve just been given by one of the midwives who took her blood pressure a few moments ago with an automatic cuff Pleasure points to a number and even though I shouldn t be surprised I am It says 210 110 I quickly finish examining her I note no edema I measure her and she measures appropriately I palpate and the baby is head down and then I listen hesitating in my mind because blood pressure like that makes me wonder if baby is even still alive It is I tell her that her blood pressure was very high and that I would like to take it again myself and manually this time She sits up and I put the cuff on When I hear the first beat and when I hear the last I am yet again surprised There is NO WAY her blood pressure is what I think it is I have to take it again I take it again and get the same reading I have never in my life even in Haiti seen a blood pressure this high I switch arms and I repeat it yet again It is indeed the same 240 140 I type those numbers and I honestly cannot

    Original URL path: https://www.midwivesforhaiti.org/easyblog/tags/hope.html (2016-04-29)
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  • IDM2015
    a great learning environment We are very happy to see all this progress I was thinking of this progress and I asked myself is it really still helpful for the Americans to visit here We have so many good Haitian midwives now and Nadene and Dr Steve have selected some of the best ones to be your instructors and teachers I wondered Maybe it is not important for me to come here it would be better to send the travel money to the Midwives for Haiti organization But I want to share with you the answer that I found to this question First it is very important for me to come to Haiti and work with you student midwives because this work nourishes my heart I come here because I hope for this project to become a true collaboration between Haitian people and Americans We bring medical knowledge and supplies financial support and administrative skills But you teach me many things too I learn from the Haitian people about patience and endurance and about relying always on God and each other for help So I come here not only to teach but also to learn I also come here because I believe that being a midwife is a spiritual calling When we take this job it is a responsibility to care for women and babies at their most delicate time And if we have this responsibility it is not only toward the women in our own towns and countries We are responsible to help care for all women and to help protect them as best we can through their childbearing time So even though I am an American midwife I am a midwife first And the women of Haiti need more midwives So I come here to help you fill that need This week we begin with the most basic things about being a midwife The things we discuss will be very simple but they are also the most important Just like the stones that we put down to build a house these ides are the foundation that will support everything else that you learn in the program You will learn many skills and have a lot of knowledge about pregnancy and birth and health care when you graduate But if you fail to learn these first principles you will not be a true midwife 1 Love This is the guide that you must have in your heart when you do this work You must have love guide you as you care for women and their babies Love will cause you to speak kindly to all women rich or poor a pastor s wife or a prostitute When you are very tired and want to sleep love will help you stay awake to help a woman who is afraid and in pain Love will help you get out of bed and report to work on time to help your sister midwife when she is done her work and needs to

    Original URL path: https://www.midwivesforhaiti.org/easyblog/tags/idm2015.html (2016-04-29)
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