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  • middle aged woman approached with an infant bundled in a blanket She waded into the water and headed our way with the infant held high against her chest Mid way across she began speaking to the interpreter that I was standing with and they chatted back and forth for a minute as she completed her crossing and continued up the hill I don t speak the language so I didn t understand the conversation He and I eventually made our way back to the clinic and walked back into the church to find this same woman inside She wanted her grandchild to be seen for the diarrhea the baby was experiencing Diarrhea not an uncommon complaint in worried parents either in Haiti or in the United States Pretty routine right Unbeknownst to us all The Moment had arrived The baby s mother had died suddenly the week before when her daughter was only 3 weeks old All the grandmother knew about the death was that the mother had a big headache and then just died Not a common occurrence in my country but not something a Haitian would question Life can be hard here I was getting my stethoscope to do a quick exam on the baby when I was asked by one of our interpreters Bengie if it was okay for Isabelle to nurse the baby Isabelle has a baby of her own and she had plenty of breast milk to share Of course I gave my okay although I didn t really think it was my decision to make The decision was Isabelle s and the choice that she made was to give of herself to this baby who had nothing and in so doing she made a choice that turned out to be a gift to us

    Original URL path: https://www.midwivesforhaiti.org/easyblog/entry/holy-moments-by-vanessa-fowlkes-fnp.html?tmpl=component&print=1&format=print (2016-04-29)
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  • if the placenta was completely expelled 4 The baby s shoulders can get stuck in the pelvic bones This is more common with big babies but can also happen to anyone 5 The baby s cord could prolapse or come out in front of the head It is more common when the bag of water is broken artificially but it can happen to anyone 6 You can get an infection In even the cleanest of situations there are bacteria that you can be exposed to during birth 7 The baby could be stressed by the labor and not get enough oxygen This is more common if the placenta is not healthy but can happen with even healthy placentas 8 The baby could be in a position that makes it difficult to exit the pelvis well and labor could go very long 9 The uterus could invert turn inside out while the baby is coming out It is pretty rare but sometimes happens to women who have had a lot of babies 10 The placenta could be retained and not come out at all This may be because of conditions where it grows into the wall of the uterus or just will not detach on its own for some reason These complications can happen to anyone anytime and anywhere in the world Whether one chooses to birth at home at a birth center or in a hospital having a skilled birth attendant has been proven to make the difference between life and death for mothers and babies However if you are a woman in a rural village in the 72 countries of this world and do not have a skilled attendant equipped to respond to these emergencies here s what can happen in those ten situations 1 The baby could die

    Original URL path: https://www.midwivesforhaiti.org/easyblog/entry/why-skilled-attendance-matters-by-nadene-brunk.html?tmpl=component&print=1&format=print (2016-04-29)
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  • excellent education and scheduled for follow up visits in our new postnatal clinic With this new program we hope to increase the number of patients receiving postnatal care at Hospital Ste Therese from 1 to 100 Postnatal care can mean the difference between life and death for moms and babies We just finished our first full week of postnatal examinations discharge teaching for moms newborns at Hopital Ste Therese Our two hired SBAs who work on this program are Illa Philogene and Juslène Regulus Last Friday Juslene saw EIGHT moms on her own Another VERY EXCITING thing happened that day Part of the discharge teaching is a list of warning signs to return to the hospital for Some mom s can t read so Illa Juslene review the points and have the moms say each one back to them This morning we had a mom come find us knowing that we were the Post Natal team She had been discharged yesterday after a normal delivery typically sent home after 6 hours and came back today because her baby had a fever POINT 1 on the baby warning sign list We took a temp to confirm and it was 38C 100

    Original URL path: https://www.midwivesforhaiti.org/easyblog/entry/postnatal-care-program-it-s-working.html?tmpl=component&print=1&format=print (2016-04-29)
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  • a very vocal woman delivery in the background and a small baby that was wrapped in a sheet on the floor all by itself Seeing the baby on the floor is an image burned in my mind because I honestly thought the baby was dead and discarded on the floor I have seen death in the hospital I work at it s not ever easy but the fact that the baby was on the floor alone just made my heart sink I picked up the baby and was relieved to find the baby although cold breathing and alive The baby immediately urinated all over me good sign His mother was lying across the room from him on the floor in the same sheet she delivered on 24 hours prior with an empty IV that had held magnesium and her head was cradled on her mother s lap I knelt down to put the baby against his mother to warm the baby up Through Shirley my interpreter I found out from the grandmother that while the baby had been crying all night the family had not let the baby eat because the teenage mother had been having seizures and they thought that if the baby nursed that the baby would also get seizures I told her that the baby was safe to nurse but the mother was resistant to nurse her baby because she couldn t see anything and she didn t want to sit up The grandmother was worried that her daughter was now blind After the grandmother was reassured I had her put the baby skin to skin and told her that it was important that the baby get something to eat I m positive that the grandmother thought I was crazy putting the baby skin to skin with

    Original URL path: https://www.midwivesforhaiti.org/easyblog/entry/two-lives-saved-a-story-from-jennifer-straub-lc.html?tmpl=component&print=1&format=print (2016-04-29)
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  • From Our Staff
    with Manno the House Manager when MFH arrived in Hinche My husband was the manager at Whitney Clinic and he was the one who talked to Manno and got midwives to come to Whit Tags maternal health midwives women s health haiti mobile clinic 0 Continue reading 36 Hits 0 Comments Apr 18 In His Words Growing Up In Haiti Midwives For Haiti From Our Staff My JourneyA beautiful story of love and generosity By Jean Mariot Cleophat manager of the Carrie Wortham Birth Center in Cabestor Haiti A mule has a foal to rest its back No matter where you are from no matter how well educated you are someone paid the price for you to become the person you are today nbsp 0 Continue reading 164 Hits 0 Comments Feb 08 What s Love Got To Do With It Midwives For Haiti From Our Staff For midwife Claudie Exume love has everything do to with it It is love for her Haitian sisters that compelled her to become a midwife When she noticed a lot of women in her hometown dying in childbirth she decided to do something about it I thought if I went into women s health I could help my community she says Now a staff mid Tags women mothers haiti valentine s day midwife 0 Continue reading 989 Hits 0 Comments Feb 01 Mr Midwife in Haiti Midwives For Haiti From Our Staff When I was in Haiti recently I had the pleasure of seeing one of our newest maternity staff at Hospital Ste Therese Guilet Enelus in action Guilet is a graduate of our 7th class and this is first permanent full time position after graduating in 2014 When I asked Guilet how his work was going he said this It is not

    Original URL path: https://www.midwivesforhaiti.org/easyblog/categories/from-our-staff.html?limitstart=0 (2016-04-29)
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  • have access to care The team sets up in churches schools community buildings or sometimes under a tree and gets to work while expecting and newly delivered mothers wait patiently for the health care they know will make a difference for themselves and their babies surviving childbirth or not Every Haitian mother knows a woman who has died from pregnancy or birth complications Magdala Jean a graduate of Midwives For Haiti who now works on the mobile clinic says Too many women are dying in birth My cousin died because of eclampsia a treatable complication I want women to have loving care and support In Haiti the focus is on survival and hope that mother and baby will live through the many complications that are brought on by poor nutrition malaria worms early hypertension lack of prenatal care lack of transportation and a lack of skilled birth attendants By bringing comprehensive prenatal and postnatal care to rural women by skilled compassionate providers all graduates of Midwives For Haiti s training program the Mobile Prenatal Clinic closes a critical gap in care for very poor women This care includes providing vitamins and iron supplements maternal and fetal health assessment lab testing and treatment for anemia worms malaria sexually transmitted infections and referrals for HIV Mothers also receive extensive education on the importance of nutrition breastfeeding danger signs of pregnancy and when to seek help Every woman receives a chart and her health is followed throughout her pregnancy Very ill mothers receive emergency transport to a medical facility The project is working The Mobile Prenatal Clinic provides over 6 000 patient visits annually Last year alone the midwives transported 25 mothers for life saving emergency medical care For the rural women of these 20 remote villages the care these traveling midwives provide

    Original URL path: https://www.midwivesforhaiti.org/easyblog/entry/solutions-that-work-bringing-maternal-care-to-rural-women-in-haiti.html?tmpl=component&print=1&format=print (2016-04-29)
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  • here to be a guest Okaaaay I wondered why in the world a 15 year old boy would come here to hang out to watch pregnant women and busy midwives meander around in the hot sun as if it were entertaining Very puzzling to me but I shrugged and went about my business smiling at the oddity The mild morning warmth quickly stretched into the blazing afternoon and the steady stream of patients became just a few remaining One of the last remaining patients got up on the exam table Bonjou My name is Tara I m a midwife As I began to talk I instinctively put my hands on her belly feeling as I spoke Her soft stretched gravid belly reminds me of a momma who has carried 10 babies within her throughout her life What baby is this for you It is my 4th It creeps into my mind she is expecting her 4th baby just like me We are two women in the same phase of life She is like me I am like her Yet so far How are you feeling OK she responds after my translator has translated what I have said to her When are you due I ask April she says Is your baby active Yes Do you have any complaints headaches Yes she says I have had a headache for 3 weeks Hmmm Are you having any visual disturbances Yes I have been seeing spots for 3 weeks she tells me What was her blood pressure I ask Pleasure my interpreter He rummages through the paperwork I ve just been given by one of the midwives who took her blood pressure a few moments ago with an automatic cuff Pleasure points to a number and even though I shouldn t be surprised I am It says 210 110 I quickly finish examining her I note no edema I measure her and she measures appropriately I palpate and the baby is head down and then I listen hesitating in my mind because blood pressure like that makes me wonder if baby is even still alive It is I tell her that her blood pressure was very high and that I would like to take it again myself and manually this time She sits up and I put the cuff on When I hear the first beat and when I hear the last I am yet again surprised There is NO WAY her blood pressure is what I think it is I have to take it again I take it again and get the same reading I have never in my life even in Haiti seen a blood pressure this high I switch arms and I repeat it yet again It is indeed the same 240 140 I type those numbers and I honestly cannot wrap my mind around it If someone would have told me that there was a person with a blood pressure this high I likely would not believe it I

    Original URL path: https://www.midwivesforhaiti.org/easyblog/entry/sweat-dirt-and-love-by-tara-elrod.html?tmpl=component&print=1&format=print (2016-04-29)
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  • Though our paths had only recently crossed in brief circumstances it quickly became apparent that our connection was bound by respect and camaraderie Each and every day was filled with an abundance of memorable moments sites and personal connections Our anticipated first day of acclimation and cultural integration transformed as rapidly as one can change out of church clothes and into scrubs A rapid shift in plans came with news that several nurses had not shown up for work at the hospital Without question or debate we were headed to work Within minutes of waving farewell and thank you to our taxi drivers we were directed to the postpartum ward where an eclamptic mother lay unconscious with her limp newborn boy Mother and baby were surrounded by several worried family members earnestly waiting for anything to alter the bleak reality before them My mind instantly focused on the clinical tasks at hand and potential outcomes We did not have oxygen suction IV S or a NICU doctor readily available if at all We did however have our eyes ears hands and instincts to maneuver through the rawness of a family s devastation Skin to skin Cindy gently advised Upon bringing this infant to his mother s bare breast I searched for breath movement and even just a dribble of colostrum I remembered the family asking for all that could be done to save the two lives before them In respect of their wishes yet in personal conflict with possible unfavorable outcome from resuscitating a 28 week old infant in this environment I began chest compressions The perceived hours blurred in the minutes it took for a heart rate to go from 30 to 120 Wrapped in a shirt the baby was then carried away to a newly available bed in

    Original URL path: https://www.midwivesforhaiti.org/easyblog/entry/each-day-in-haiti-by-emily-tinsley-rn-msned.html?tmpl=component&print=1&format=print (2016-04-29)
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