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  • Restore the Mississippi River Delta
    The Delta and America s Economy Restoration Projects Restoration Projects Interactive Map of Projects Project Regions Project Types Project List Key Principles Our Work Overview 10 FAQ s about restoring the delta Science Public Policy 2012 Coastal Master Plan RESTORE Act Natural Resource Damage Assessment Economics Blog Media Room Media Resource Us in the News Latest Delta News Fact Sheets Press Releases Reports and Resources Videos About Who We Are What We Do Meet Our Experts Contact Upcoming Events Support Restoration Sign up Take Action Protect The Funding Volunteer This cool interactive map shows exactly where 19 recommended restoration projects could exist on Louisiana s coast Check out our blog Learn more A Great American Resource The Mississippi River Delta is one of America s great natural resources The delta supports America s economy wildlife and cultural heritage But after decades of abuse and mismanagement the delta is disappearing rapidly sinking into the Gulf of Mexico We can restore the delta by connecting the Mississippi River to its wetlands but we must act now before it is too late The Coalition to Restore Coastal Louisiana plants their 10 000th tree in Braithwaite LA By Brittany Boyke Habitat Restoration Program Coordinator

    Original URL path: http://www.mississippiriverdelta.org/ (2016-05-01)
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  • Get In Touch | Restore the Mississippi River Delta
    FAQ s about restoring the delta Science Public Policy 2012 Coastal Master Plan RESTORE Act Natural Resource Damage Assessment Economics Blog Media Room Media Resource Us in the News Latest Delta News Fact Sheets Press Releases Reports and Resources Videos About Who We Are What We Do Meet Our Experts Contact Upcoming Events Support Restoration Sign up Take Action Protect The Funding Volunteer About Who We Are What We Do

    Original URL path: http://www.mississippiriverdelta.org/about/contact/ (2016-05-01)
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  • Discover the Mississippi River Delta | Restore the Mississippi River Delta
    Experts Contact Upcoming Events Support Restoration Sign up Take Action Protect The Funding Volunteer Discover the Delta Discover the Delta How the Delta Formed What Went Wrong Hurricanes Katrina and Rita BP Oil Disaster America Needs the Delta The Delta and America s Economy The Delta and Seafood The Delta and Its Communities The Delta in American Life and Culture Wildlife and Natural Resources RELATED SOURCES Discover the Delta The Mississippi River Delta is a vast mosaic of marshes and forested wetlands estuaries navigable waterways and islands that makes up most of southern Louisiana The Mississippi River Delta sustains enormous populations of wildlife has given birth to some of our country s most distinctive cultures and traditions and made possible America s rise as a global superpower through innovative economic development Learn more about why America needs the Mississippi River Delta Satellite view of the Mississippi River Delta NASA The Mississippi River Delta formed over thousands of years as North America s mightiest river deposited sand clay and organic material into the warm shallow waters of the northern Gulf of Mexico But over the last 200 300 years human alterations of the river system have caused the delta to collapse

    Original URL path: http://www.mississippiriverdelta.org/discover-the-delta/ (2016-05-01)
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  • How the Mississippi River Delta Formed | Restore the Mississippi River Delta
    America s Delta Audubon Important bird areas in Louisiana How the Delta Formed The modern Mississippi River Delta formed over the last 7 000 years in a dynamic process known as the delta cycle Each delta cycle results in a new delta lobe created over a period of around 1 000 2 000 years as the river carries sediments from the interior of the continent and deposits them near its mouth in the warm waters of the Gulf of Mexico When enough sediment stacks up underwater plants begin to grow and even more sediment and organic materials accumulate as plant communities thrive and develop As the delta lobe continues to build the river s path to the Gulf becomes longer and more difficult In response the river finally changes course abandoning the older lobe and cutting a shorter route to the Gulf starting the process again Coastal Louisiana s historic delta lobes These abandoned lobes gradually sink and erode forming extremely productive estuaries and leaving barrier island arcs behind to mark their former extent New lobes form with the river s new route building up new land for marsh plants and trees to take hold This constant ebb and flow creates a dynamic and ever changing mosaic of habitats and natural resources A natural delta exists in a state of constant change By the time of European settlement the Mississippi River Delta Plain stretched across a remarkable 7 000 square miles making it one of the largest river deltas in the world At this time the river was active in the Balize delta lobe an area now often called the birdsfoot delta Because the end of this lobe lies near the continental shelf and thus deep water it provided tremendous opportunities for waterborne commerce and transportation leading to the rise

    Original URL path: http://www.mississippiriverdelta.org/discover-the-delta/how-the-delta-formed/ (2016-05-01)
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  • What Went Wrong? | Restore the Mississippi River Delta
    River Delta is disappearing at an astonishing rate A football field of wetlands vanishes into open water almost every hour Since the 1930s Louisiana has lost nearly 1 900 square miles of land an area roughly equivalent in size to the state of Delaware Many factors have led to the delta s collapse One of the most significant is that the lower Mississippi River has been straitjacketed with huge levees as part of a national program to control the Mississippi River and protect communities economic infrastructure and croplands from river flooding But the delta s wetlands are built and sustained by sediment delivered by the river Cutting the river off from its delta with levees doomed existing wetlands and largely stopped the cycle of new wetlands growth Without land building deposits from the river the delta is doomed to continue sinking beneath the water endangering people wildlife and jobs Exacerbating the problem are a vast network of shipping channels including the Mississippi River Gulf Outlet the Houma Navigational Canal and the Freshwater Bayou Canal Thousands of miles of oil and gas canals have been dug to accommodate energy infrastructure and extraction These channels and canals alter the natural hydrology and allow saltwater to penetrate deep into the wetlands disrupting the salinity balance and killing the vegetation of freshwater wetlands causing them to subside underwater Learn how we can utilize the Mississippi s power to build and sustain land in the delta In addition to these land loss issues the delta has in recent years suffered through additional catastrophes In 2005 Hurricanes Katrina and Rita wrecked coastal communities The damage they wrought in the form of flooding and storm surge was made worse by the previous loss of miles of protective wetlands Then in 2010 devastation came again in the form of the BP oil disaster when millions of barrels of oil spewed from the Deepwater Horizon oil rig only to wash up on Louisiana shorelines Both of these catastrophes were crushing blows to an already degraded region Their effects add increased urgency to the need for long term large scale restoration of the Mississippi River Delta Causes of the Delta s collapse Oil and Gas Infrastructure Louisiana is America s Energy Coast There are thousands of offshore oil rigs and onshore wells in coastal Louisiana significant refinery capacity and thousands of miles of pipelines connecting it all Over the decades these activities have directly impacted thousands of acres of coastal wetlands and modified the coastal hydrology speeding up erosion Dams Upriver Valuable land building sediments are trapped behind locks and dams on the Missouri Mississippi and Ohio Rivers Since 1850 the amount of sediment in the Lower Mississippi River has decreased by more than 70 percent Subsidence Land formed by river sediments naturally subsides and sinks over time Historically sediment deposition and accretion by plant growth outpaced the natural subsidence resulting in coastal land gain Without land building deposits from the river subsidence dominates and massive areas of land sink

    Original URL path: http://www.mississippiriverdelta.org/discover-the-delta/what-went-wrong/ (2016-05-01)
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  • America Needs the Delta | Restore the Mississippi River Delta
    Natural Resource Damage Assessment Economics Blog Media Room Media Resource Us in the News Latest Delta News Fact Sheets Press Releases Reports and Resources Videos About Who We Are What We Do Meet Our Experts Contact Upcoming Events Support Restoration Sign up Take Action Protect The Funding Volunteer Discover the Delta Discover the Delta How the Delta Formed What Went Wrong Hurricanes Katrina and Rita BP Oil Disaster America Needs the Delta The Delta and America s Economy The Delta and Seafood The Delta and Its Communities The Delta in American Life and Culture Wildlife and Natural Resources RELATED SOURCES Related America Needs the Delta Building a Restoration Economy Delta Dispatches Faces of the Delta Delta Dispatches Profiles in Resilience America Needs the Delta The Mississippi River Delta is one of America s greatest natural resources The delta s wetlands and waterways contribute tens of billions of dollars to our national economy every year and support millions of jobs Continued collapse of the delta would destabilize economic systems throughout the nation The delta sustains Commercial trade routes that connect America s heartland to the rest of the world Critical and extensive energy infrastructure Fisheries that produce 25 percent of American

    Original URL path: http://www.mississippiriverdelta.org/discover-the-delta/america-needs-the-delta/ (2016-05-01)
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  • American Life and Culture | Restore the Mississippi River Delta
    The Funding Volunteer Discover the Delta Discover the Delta How the Delta Formed What Went Wrong Hurricanes Katrina and Rita BP Oil Disaster America Needs the Delta The Delta and America s Economy The Delta and Seafood The Delta and Its Communities The Delta in American Life and Culture Wildlife and Natural Resources RELATED SOURCES Related Discover the Delta Restoring America s Delta Audubon Important bird areas in Louisiana The Delta in American Life and Culture Laissez les bons temps rouler The Mississippi River Delta is one of the world s most unique places Not only is it home to three million acres of wetlands vital wildlife habitat and abundant hunting and fishing grounds it is also the birthplace of jazz gumbo and Mardi Gras Such natural and cultural diversity makes Coastal Louisiana a truly iconic American place What makes coastal Louisiana unique are the people who live there people whose lives are intricately tied to the delta They are descendants of Native Americans Acadians Cajuns Canary Islanders Islenos Europeans Africans and others who settled in the delta and along Louisiana s coast These were people drawn to the area because the Mississippi River was and still is the gateway

    Original URL path: http://www.mississippiriverdelta.org/discover-the-delta/america-needs-the-delta/the-delta-in-american-life-and-culture/ (2016-05-01)
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  • The Delta and Its Communities | Restore the Mississippi River Delta
    Natural Resource Damage Assessment Economics Blog Media Room Media Resource Us in the News Latest Delta News Fact Sheets Press Releases Reports and Resources Videos About Who We Are What We Do Meet Our Experts Contact Upcoming Events Support Restoration Sign up Take Action Protect The Funding Volunteer Discover the Delta Discover the Delta How the Delta Formed What Went Wrong Hurricanes Katrina and Rita BP Oil Disaster America Needs the Delta The Delta and America s Economy The Delta and Seafood The Delta and Its Communities The Delta in American Life and Culture Wildlife and Natural Resources RELATED SOURCES Related America Needs the Delta Building a Restoration Economy Delta Dispatches Faces of the Delta Delta Dispatches Profiles in Resilience The Delta and its Communities A healthy delta sustains local economies and cultures Connected to the land Coastal Louisiana is home to nearly 2 million people nearly all of who depend in some way on the Mississippi River Delta for their livelihoods Tourism transportation and commercial fishing and shrimping are just a few of the many industries relying on a healthy river and delta The Mississippi River Delta s habitats provide numerous economic benefits such as oyster beds wildlife habitat and fishing grounds Coastal communities have been living off the delta for decades and a sustainable healthy delta is critical to their survival What land loss means to local communities As Louisiana s wetlands recede communities and businesses are becoming exposed and vulnerable to disaster Subsidence and storm surge have caused Louisiana to lose 1 900 square miles of coastal land since the 1930 s As land disappears local communities are finding themselves closer and closer to open water Without action to reconnect the Mississippi River to its delta Louisiana s people and economies will be in jeopardy Building resilient

    Original URL path: http://www.mississippiriverdelta.org/discover-the-delta/america-needs-the-delta/the-delta-and-its-communities/ (2016-05-01)
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