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  • Mississippi River Gulf Outlet | Restore the Mississippi River Delta
    which will help prevent erosion The outdoor class room also includes an orchard now growing grapefruit orange satsuma kumquat fig and apple trees along with a magnolia tree Program coordinator Kathy Muse started a butterfly garden in the back part of the site several years ago Shaded outdoor classroom and kayak storage Phase 2 of Wetland Education Center will include the placement of a modular classroom Designed by Eskew Dumez Ripple in partnership with the US Green Building Council USGBC the classroom features sustainable building materials and design elements It was showcased at the 2014 USGBC Green Build held in New Orleans The classroom which was donated to CSED will be used as a K 12 environmental education center and research space While the Wetland Education Center is still a work in progress it is currently open to the community and it will be a gathering and learning site for wetland awareness and water management CSED believes that the first step towards resiliency is education and with the help of the Wetland Education Center the Lower 9th Ward will become more resilient than ever CSED and other environmental groups will be holding a ribbon cutting ceremony for the first phase of the project on August 11th at 10am following a press event at the Bayou Bienvenue Wetland Triangle Platform to discuss the state of our coast 10 years after Hurricane Katrina For more information on this event contact Samantha Carter at carterS nwf org For more information on CSED and how you can get involved click here 1 Comment 10 years post Katrina Where have you gone Mr Go June 8 2015 Posted by lbourg in Hurricane Katrina K10 Mississippi River Gulf Outlet By Amanda Moore Deputy Director National Wildlife Federation Restore the Mississippi River Delta Coalition Over the coming months as we approach the 10 th anniversaries of Hurricanes Katrina and Rita the Restore the Mississippi River Delta Coalition will publish a series of blog posts that examine issues and topics relevant to these events particularly as they relate to coastal restoration Below is an update on the Mississippi River Gulf Outlet MRGO Home in lower 9th ward Post Katrina Even before the storm locals dubbed the Mississippi River Gulf Outlet MRGO a hurricane surge super highway Since its construction in the 1950s MRGO has impacted over 600 000 acres of coastal ecosystems surrounding the Greater New Orleans area and destroyed over 27 000 acres of wetlands that once served as important buffer from storm surge Indeed ten years ago MRGO lived up to its name and intensified the impact of Hurricane Katrina creating a funnel that channeled its surge into the heart of communities The result Catastrophic destruction After Katrina it was clearer than ever that Mr Go had to go Ten years later we examine what has been accomplished what work remains and how you can help Accomplishments MRGO was finally closed Following the storm in 2006 renowned Louisiana coastal scientists released a report detailing the impacts of the channel and recommending its closure In this same year the MRGO Must Go Coalition a group of 17 local and national NGOs and community organizations was formed to advocate for the closure of MRGO and restoration of the ecosystem Congress passed the Water Resources and Development Act in 2007 mandating the channel be closed to navigation and the Army Corps develop a plan for ecosystem restoration By 2009 the channel was closed with a rock dam near Bayou La Loutre and a 1 1 billion surge barrier across the MRGO funnel was officially completed in 2013 These closures have moderated surface water salinity setting the stage for large scale ecosystem restoration MRGO surge barrier MRGO rock dam Advocacy resulting in impact The MRGO Must Go Coalition worked closely with the Corps to watchdog the drafting of their congressionally mandated ecosystem restoration plan The groups helped define the size of the impact area brought community concerns to the forefront and helped prioritize projects The coalition whose positions are captured in these 2010 and 2011 papers successfully extended public comment period timelines and increased the number of scheduled public hearings A record 75 000 public comments were sent to the Army Corps in support of MRGO Must Go recommendations Some of the coalition s recommendations were included in the Army Corps plan and others notably the Violet Diversion were not Restoration planning in earnest In 2012 the final 3 billion Army Corps MRGO ecosystem restoration plan was approved and sent to the Assistant Secretary of the Army and a Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement was completed Assistant Secretary Darcy then recommended 1 325 billion of projects to Congress for appropriations This was an unusual move and speaks to strong public activism on the issue since the Corps has no local sponsor for the MRGO project due to a dispute with the State of Louisiana about who is responsible for paying for these restoration projects Despite strong public support and heavy activism no wetland restoration projects in the plan have been funded by the Army Corps to date Around the same time in 2012 the State of Louisiana released their 2012 Coastal Master Plan which recognized the impacts of MRGO and touted the benefits of proposed projects The plan also reflected the important role played by the NGO community and included the vast majority of the MRGO Must Go Coalition s ecosystem restoration recommendations including many of those in the Army Corps plan What still needs to happen Meaningful restoration The MRGO projects in the 2012 Coastal Master Plan are proving critical guides for current restoration efforts in the New Orleans area The Master Plan served as a blueprint for the CWPPRA program as two projects in the MRGO impacted area advanced to planning and design in 2014 It will also guide restoration work funded by the RESTORE Act legislation that brings Clean Water Act penalties generated from the Deepwater Horizon oil disaster which directly impacted the MRGO ecosystem area in 2010 to the Gulf coast for restoration In 2014 the state put forward three key MRGO projects Golden Triangle Marsh Creation Biloxi Marsh Oyster Reef Restoration and the Maurepas Diversion as candidates for RESTORE Council The MRGO Must Go Coalition has met with RESTORE Council staff on several occasions to ensure they are fully aware of the need for restoration in the MRGO area We will soon learn if these state proposed projects were indeed chosen for funding Projected land loss in MRGO area Planned restoration for MRGO area So what can you do We ve had many successes over the years with the closure of the channel and developing plans for restoration However implementing these plans and restoring our critical coastal ecosystem remains As the RESTORE Act process plays out more funding will become available for restoration under direction of the RESTORE Council State of Louisiana and local parish governments Those decision makers will have the opportunity to ensure funds are used for restoration based on the best science and to make sure MRGO is addressed It s up to everyone who cares about the future resilience of our region to speak up The loss of wetlands caused by the channel leaves us without our historic protective wetland buffer a major line of defense against storm surges and an important factor in the effectiveness of our new 14 billion levee system We can strategically restore our region s protective wetlands and sustain a healthy coastal ecosystem but it s up to us to be our own champions for resilience and ensure the right projects are funded As we approach the tenth anniversary of Hurricane Katrina we have our work cut out for us to ensure that restoration which is vitally important to our region s future moves forward with urgency Visit restorethebayou org to learn how you can view the MRGO ecosystem impacts in person learn more about ongoing ecosystem restoration and how you can get involved Check out these albums from the MRGO Must Go Facebook page to see photos before and after the outlet s closure No Comments Golden Triangle Marsh Creation Project December 4 2014 Posted by lbourg in Community Resiliency Gulf Coast Ecosystem Restoration Council Mississippi River Gulf Outlet Restoration Projects Water Resources Development Act WRDA Louisiana recently proposed 5 projects to be funded by the initial round of funding from the RESTORE Act The Golden Triangle Marsh Creation project located in the Pontchartrain Maurepas Basin is designed to restore and protect wetland fish and wildlife habitat and help maintain landscape integrity and enhance community resilience Here s what we wrote to the Louisiana Coastal Protection and Restoration Authority in support of the Golden Triangle Marsh Creation project Dear Coastal Protection and Restoration Authority members The undersigned groups appreciate this opportunity to share our collective supporting comments on the Golden Triangle Marsh Creation Project submitted by the State of Louisiana for RESTORE Council consideration for the first Funded Priorities List of the RESTORE Pot 2 Council selected projects We represent a coalition of conservation interests that have worked for decades to restore a healthy Gulf of Mexico ecosystem starting with prompt restoration of the Mississippi River Delta reconnecting the Mississippi River to its delta to protect communities environment and economies Our groups continue to recommend urgent action on projects that will reduce land loss and restore wetlands in the Mississippi River Delta through comprehensive restoration actions that have the potential to provide multiple benefits and services over the long term to the entire Gulf of Mexico Most of the necessary restoration actions to be undertaken in Louisiana are already fully authorized under the Water Resources Development Act WRDA of 2007 were unanimously approved by the Louisiana legislature in the 2012 Coastal Master Plan enjoy broad public support and have been vetted by scientists and lawmakers for many years The Golden Triangle Marsh Creation Project located near the confluence of the Mississippi River Gulf Outlet shipping channel and the Gulf Intracoastal Waterway is in an area badly damaged by the saltwater intrusion and erosion that followed the dredging of the MRGO The restored marsh will work with a nearby shoreline protection and marsh creation funded by the Coastal Impact Assistance Program CIAP to help buffer the newly constructed IHNC Surge Barrier which is essential to the Greater New Orleans flood protection and will also provide important estuarine habitat for Lake Borgne and Mississippi Sound The project has undergone technical analysis completed by the Corps and the State of Louisiana through the MRGO Ecosystem Restoration Plan authorized in WRDA 2007 The project has a signed Chief s Report and a completed Programmatic EIS The project is important not only for its obvious marsh creation benefits but also for the citizens of the area who use the area located so close to the city of New Orleans This project enjoys much public support and will increase the resilience of surrounding communities We support the continued development of the Golden Triangle Marsh Creation Project and thank the Coastal Protection and Restoration Authority for submitting it to the RESTORE Council No Comments RESTORE Council Staff Brave the Cold to visit the Bayou Bienvenue Wetland Triangle November 20 2014 Posted by lbourg in Gulf Coast Ecosystem Restoration Council Mississippi River Gulf Outlet By Samantha Carter Restore the Mississippi River Delta National Wildlife Federation Wind Rain Record setting lows None of that stopped community members and conservation groups from welcoming members of a federal restoration council to a potential project site in the Lower Ninth Ward last Thursday morning Members of the MRGO Must Go Coalition met with Executive Director Justin Ehrenwerth and Environmental Compliance Director John Ettinger of the Gulf Coast Ecosystem Restoration Council at the Bayou Bienvenue Wetland Triangle platform in New Orleans Lower Ninth Ward Joined by representatives from the US Army Corps of Engineers and the City of New Orleans Office of Coastal and Environmental Affairs we had a robust discussion about the future of restoration in the Mississippi River Gulf Outlet MRGO ecosystem area The platform at the end of Caffin Avenue overlooks a 400 acre ghost swamp a remnant of a dense freshwater cypress tupelo forest that existed in the city boundaries until roughly 50 years ago Saltwater intrusion caused by the construction of the MRGO in the 1960s killed the cypress swamp in the Lower 9 th Ward and destroyed tens of thousands of acres of wetlands that once protected the Greater New Orleans area The MRGO channel and the loss of the surrounding wetlands are attributed to the catastrophic flooding that occurred in the Lower Ninth Ward and surrounding communities during Hurricane Katrina in 2005 The Bayou Bienvenue Wetland Triangle provides a unique opportunity for highly visible coastal restoration work Only five miles from the French Quarter the platform already attracts Orleans Parish locals and tourists alike who can learn about the history of the swamp and see an example of the coastal land loss problems that extend throughout southern Louisiana If the project is funded and constructed reintroducing Mississippi River sediment and freshwater into the Bayou Bienvenue Wetland Triangle could return the conditions in the area to a place where cypress swamp can once again survive In addition to restoring ecology and increasing quality of life for residents restoration work in this location would allow the public easy access to see the State s Coastal Master Plan in action and potentially RESTORE Act restoration funds at work Discussions with the MRGO coalition and the RESTORE Council staff focused on this possibility and the process by which restoration projects are going to be chosen The frigid weather kept the site visit short but conversations continued in the warmth of the Greater Little Zion Baptist Church just a few minutes away The RESTORE Council stressed the importance of coordination between different funding streams and leveraging completed work such the programmatic EIS already done by the US Army Corps of Engineers for the MRGO ecosystem restoration area MRGO Must Go coalition members shared their passion and vision for restoration and why they are engaged in the effort to see the MRGO ecosystem restored There are already plans to revisit the platform together on a sunnier day and take a flight over the MRGO ecosystem Interested in visiting the platform and learning more Check out http www restorethebayou org No Comments Guest Post Why New Orleanians should care about coastal restoration by Lynda Woolard August 4 2014 Posted by Delta Dispatches in 2012 Coastal Master Plan Hurricane Katrina Mississippi River Gulf Outlet People Guest post by Lynda Woolard New Orleans This post is the first in a two part guest series The simple truth is if we fail to restore our coast we fail to protect our city from future storms I was recently blessed with an opportunity to go along for a boat trip to see the Mississippi River Gulf Outlet MRGO and the Central Wetlands of southeast Louisiana with a delegation from the Mississippi River Delta Restoration Campaign I was initially a little anxious because despite having lived in New Orleans for 20 years this was new territory for me Although these wetlands are less than a 30 minute drive from my home I had never been out to see them New Orleans skyline from the Central Wetlands Credit Lynda Woolard I felt some relief upon reaching the marina as others on the boat were residents of St Bernard and Plaquemines Parishes and had made this trip many times for fishing work and recreation My fears were replaced by awe as we traveled into the wetlands The waterways and surrounding marshes were stunning and peaceful and seemed a world away from the city Yet amazingly we could still see the New Orleans skyline throughout much of our trip While New Orleanians identify ourselves as living in a port city we don t often think of ourselves as living in a coastal city But we do Memorial to St Bernard residents who lost their lives during Hurricane Katrina Credit Lynda Woolard Interspersed with the beautiful natural scenery of southeast Louisiana were stark reminders of how precarious our proximity to the coast is We saw an entire fishing village that had been wiped away by storm and remains a ghost town We saw the memorial and sculpture at Shell Beach placed in honor of the 163 St Bernard residents who lost their lives during Hurricane Katrina We saw the further peril we have put ourselves in by decades of carving up these coastal marshes and failing to protect them adequately The creation of the Mississippi River Gulf Outlet navigation channel which is a straight shot from the Gulf of Mexico to the Port of New Orleans has put our entire region at greater risk from hurricanes It s been called the Hurricane Highway because it led a surge of seawater in a direct path to cause catastrophic flooding of St Bernard Parish and the Lower Ninth Ward during Hurricane Katrina However its damage is more far reaching than that The construction of the MRGO has made our levees and surge barriers which were not engineered to withstand open water more vulnerable Our hurricane protection systems both manmade and natural require protection by freshwater wetlands and marsh Because of the MRGO our wetlands are disappearing at a more rapid pace The channel itself has eroded as well from a 650 foot wide waterway to 2 000 feet wide While traveling down the MRGO we could see cypress tree tombstones marking the spots where vibrant wetlands once flourished Our charter boat captain told stories about how more islands vanish with each passing year The introduction of salt water into the marshes has been disastrous Amanda Moore from the National Wildlife Federation identifies landmarks on a map of southeast Louisiana Credit Lynda Woolard The good news is that steps are being taken to restore the Mississippi River Delta There is a Coastal Master Plan in place to rebuild the wetlands barrier

    Original URL path: http://www.mississippiriverdelta.org/blog/category/mississippi-river-gulf-outlet-mrgo/ (2016-05-01)
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  • NOAA | Restore the Mississippi River Delta
    as part of the proposed third phase of early restoration The second half of the meeting will widen the focus to include Gulf wide coastal restoration plans and projects The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration NOAA and the Deepwater Horizon Natural Resource Damage Assessment NRDA Trustees will give a presentation on and listen to public comments regarding the Draft Programmatic and Phase III Early Restoration Plan and Draft Early Restoration Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement This meeting is an opportunity for the public to comment on the third and final set of projects proposed to address oil spill impacts under the Early Restoration Plan as well as the Environmental Impact Statement that assesses the projects themselves All meetings are public and will begin with an open house at 5 30 p m followed by presentations beginning at 6 00 p m Please consider joining us at one of the following meetings If you re interested in attending please contact our field director Stephanie Powell at powells nwf org Tuesday January 14 Belle Chasse Auditorium 8398 Louisiana 23 Belle Chasse Louisiana Get Directions Wednesday January 15 Warren J Harang Jr Municipal Auditorium Plantation Room 310 North Canal Boulevard Thibodaux Louisiana Get Directions Thursday January 16 Spring Hill Suites Lake Charles Pelican Room 1551 West Prien Lake Road Lake Charles Louisiana Get Directions For more information Coastal Protection and Restoration Authority coastal la gov Phase III of Early Restoration www gulfspillrestoration noaa gov restoration early restoration phase iii No Comments Louisiana Public Broadcasting Presents Louisiana Coastal Concerns BP Beyond April 23 2013 Posted by Elizabeth Van Cleve in 2012 Coastal Master Plan BP Oil Disaster Meetings Events NOAA From CWPPRA Newsflash What are viable strategies for addressing our coastal erosion in light of sea level rise subsidence hurricanes and oil spills Source Louisiana Public Broadcasting The Deepwater Horizon oil spill dumped nearly five million barrels of oil into the Gulf of Mexico with Louisiana s coast receiving the greatest percentage of direct ecological damage Three years later a civil trial is taking place to determine the financial liability of BP and three other companies for the impact to the five Gulf states Eighty percent of penalties paid by the responsible parties will go toward Gulf Coast restoration But will it be money well spent The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration NOAA recently predicted that Louisiana s southeastern coast is likely to be under at least 4 3 feet of water by the end of the century What does that mean for projects in Louisiana s Comprehensive Master Plan for a Sustainable Coast What are viable strategies for addressing the state s coastal erosion in light of sea level rise subsidence hurricanes and oil spills Louisiana Public Square explores these issues and more on Louisiana Coastal Concerns BP and Beyond Wednesday April 24th at 7 p m CT on LPB HD and at 9 p m on WLAE TV in New Orleans This week the La Public Broadcasting TV program Louisiana Public Square focuses

    Original URL path: http://www.mississippiriverdelta.org/blog/category/noaa/ (2016-05-01)
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  • People | Restore the Mississippi River Delta
    shared their experiences living in coastal Louisiana They told us how they would build a shoreline to make it safe for their families to continue living on Attendees including Plaquemines Parish Coastal Restoration Director Vincent Frelich left and Parish President Amos Cormier second from left speak with representatives from the organizations working to restore the coast By the end of the day full of fresh seafood and a reinvigorated commitment to restoring the coast the team headed back to New Orleans Boil for the Bayou was a success and we were thrilled to have so much interest in coastal restoration from Plaquemines residents elected officials and businesses Senior Outreach Coordinator Sam Carter helps a young Plaquemines resident build a coastline We would like to thank our sponsors Bubrig Insurance Agency the law offices of Cossich Sumich Parsiola Taylor Daybrook Fisheries and Whitney Bank without whom Boil for the Bayou would not have been possible No Comments We re Partnering with Dirty Coast to Feature YOUR Coastal Restoration Message July 13 2015 Posted by lbourg in Community Resiliency Economics Economy Hurricane Katrina Hurricanes K10 Meetings Events People Restoration Projects As we approach the 10 th anniversaries of Hurricanes Katrina and Rita a time when we all learned about the importance of the Louisiana coast as a first line of defense against storms Restore the Mississippi River Delta Coalition and Dirty Coast are partnering to feature YOUR coastal restoration messages on t shirts bags posters and other snazzy products that will be sold in Dirty Coast s New Orleans stores and across the web to help raise awareness and support for Louisiana coastal restoration Louisiana continues to lose a football field of land every hour and our state has lost 1 900 square miles of land since the 1930s These wetlands are crucial to protecting our homes and communities from the effects of hurricanes and storm surge Without action we stand to lose another 1 000 square miles by 2050 We want to engage people locally and nationally to understand just how important our coast is to the long term resiliency of southern Louisiana and the entire nation that depends on our region That s where YOU come in We want to hear YOUR ideas for coastal restoration slogans The creative wizzes at Dirty Coast are looking for slogans to use to create designs they ll place on products to educate people around the world about how badly we need our coast restored now How It s Going Down Submit as many ideas or slogans as you like here from now through July 23 2015 After July 23 we ll select the best THREE slogans that most closely align with the positive messages of coastal restoration and have the best potential to make rad t shirt designs We ll let YOU vote for the slogan you want to see designed into a t shirt and other products The first place slogan will be made into a design Dirty Coast will sell year round on t shirts and other products to raise funds for restoration efforts The person who submits the winning design will receive a 200 gift card to Dirty Coast second place will receive a 100 gift card and 3rd place a 50 gift card We ll announce the winning design at a launch party on August 20 at Dirty Coast s new Marigny location 2121 Chartres Street The winning design will be featured and sold in Dirty Coast stores and online over the next year with a portion of sale proceeds going to the Restore the Mississippi River Delta Coalition to help educate and engage people about the need for coastal restoration Some Tips to Help You Out Keep it positive Our situation is grave but we want to feature positive proactive messages that convey that solutions are possible Some questions to get your creative juices flowing What does the Louisiana coast mean to you Why is it important that the Louisiana coast be restored How would you explain coastal restoration to a kindergartener Why is it important that we act now to restore the coast Keep it simple The message needs to be easily understood engaging and memorable Keep it fun In case you re not familiar with Dirty Coast designs they re clever fun and captivating See some of their designs here for inspiration What s In It for You Prizes The person who submits the winning design will receive a 200 gift card to Dirty Coast second place will receive a 100 gift card and 3rd place a 50 gift card Glory Your winning message will be proudly worn by coastal warriors around the country for generations come to spread the message of Louisiana coastal restoration Pride You can tell your grandkids that you had a hand in the fight to save our coast What more reasons do you need Now get to work unleashing your creative genius to save the coast Submit your ideas here We can t wait to see the results Questions Email jhebert audubon org About Dirty Coast Dirty Coast began in 2004 as a response to what was passing for local apparel on Bourbon street a way to make cool designs for die hard New Orleanians Small batches of shirts and posters A fun side project In 2005 a Category 3 storm made its way through the area without causing too much damage Then the federal infrastructure meant to protect the city failed and filled New Orleans with water Soon after Blake found himself in Lafayette with all his plans placed on hold While in exile meditating on this fate of his beloved city Blake designed a bumper sticker that read Be a New Orleanian Wherever You Are He printed 5 000 and placed them all over New Orleans as soon as he could return The reaction to Blake s design was overwhelming and developing the Dirty Coast brand became a no brainer Why T shirts Because they are the great equalizer You can have a good design You can have fun cheeky copy But to create a shirt that exists on a level beyond your standard laundry that engages your friends and neighbors in conversation that starts debates that elicits laughter nostalgia and many Yea Ya Right That s what we re trying to do To be bold and to be real about our dirty marvelous city Everything we do everything we make is a proclamation of our love for New Orleans And when you truly love something you want to share it with as many people as possible So whether you re born here a transplant or simply passing through you can be a New Orleanian wherever you are About Restore the Mississippi River Delta Coalition The Restore the Mississippi River Delta Coalition is working to protect people wildlife and jobs by reconnecting the river with its wetlands As our region faces the crisis of threatening land loss we offer science based solutions through a comprehensive approach to restoration Composed of conservation policy science and outreach experts from Environmental Defense Fund National Audubon Society National Wildlife Federation Coalition to Restore Coastal Louisiana and Lake Pontchartrain Basin Foundation we are located in New Orleans and Baton Rouge Louisiana Washington D C and around the United States Learn more at www mississippiriverdelta org and connect with us on Facebook and Twitter No Comments A tradition worth building Collectively sustaining and stewarding our coast April 29 2015 Posted by lbourg in 5 Years Later BP Oil Disaster Community Resiliency People Voices of the Delta By Maura Wood Partnership Manager National Wildlife Federation On April 20 several members of the Restore the Mississippi River Delta campaign gathered with community members in Davant Louisiana to commemorate the 5 th anniversary since the BP oil spill with testimony and discussion about how the terrible oil unleashed on that day is still affecting us all Those gathered included representatives from NGOs fishermen residents of coastal communities business leaders employees of restoration agencies and others While there is widespread agreement that restoring our coast is a priority and that BP should pay to repair the damage it created we sometimes disagree on how best to achieve these goals Our collective situation is urgent Unfortunately our differences sometimes prevent us from making rapid progress When we let ourselves become attached to one idea or one way of doing things we may begin to see those with different ideas as one dimensional opponents making it less likely we ll be able to solve our land loss crisis To avoid this outcome I and my colleagues make contact with a variety of people concerned about restoration in as many ways and as often as possible The invitation to the workshop for Plaquemines Parish Fishermen and Fishing Communities five years after the BP oil disaster was a welcome opportunity to learn more from the first hand experiences of others The panels and discussions dealt with how BP had settled or not with fishermen the damage left behind from the oil and the dispersant and how the citizens of lower Plaquemines Parish were coping or not with the environmental financial and cultural losses forced upon them by the oil spill Testimony from fishermen shrimpers and oystermen clearly spelled out some of the obstacles they still face Prior to the spill many had served as deckhands on oyster boats or as small operators selling sack oysters from the public seed grounds For some troubles began even earlier with Hurricane Katrina Following the oil spill producing the necessary proof of loss of income was difficult for many of these fishermen resulting in their receiving little to no compensation from BP Other participants expressed concerns about the long term effects of dispersants sprayed during the oil spill the failure of oysters to recover on the east side of the river and how the oil spill was still unravelling the economic fabric of the lower parish The marina they said the heart of the community is now silent and without business Before Katrina and the spill this was a center for exchange within the community Families gathered here after school Young men earned spending money by unloading oysters Trucks came in and out loading and shipping seafood Without this center people feel the heart of their community is gone What is the price of a tradition one woman asked The participants in this workshop provided a glimpse into the real struggles they face in trying to recover from the impact of the BP oil spill Sharing individual stories helps us view each other as real people with good intentions seeking to make it right When we see each other as people with unique stories and valuable perspectives we can better empathize with and address each other s concerns about the uncertainties of coastal restoration The reward A new tradition of people from different walks of life working towards the same goal collectively sustaining and stewarding our coast and coastal communities for all Louisianans That is a tradition worth building No Comments Happy Halloween Beware of the Rougarou October 31 2014 Posted by edendavis in Meetings Events People This is a rougarou On Saturday October 25 th the Restore the Mississippi River Delta field team came together to recruit supporters for coastal restoration at Rougarou Fest in Houma Louisiana Rougarou Fest is a family friendly festival with a spooky flair that celebrates the rich folklore that exists along the bayous of Southeast Louisiana It is also the primary fundraiser supporting the South Louisiana Wetlands Discovery Center a nonprofit tax exempt organization that is working to educate individuals about Louisiana s disappearing coast If you are not a native to southern Louisiana you may be wondering What is a rougarou The rougarou legend has been spread for many generations directly from French settlers In the Cajun legends the rougarou is said to prowl the swamps around Acadiana and Greater New Orleans as well as the fields and forests of the regions The rougarou is a creature with a human body and the head of a wolf or dog similar to a werewolf Rougarou Fest was full of fun along with a few spooky scares Throughout the day the field team passed out educational materials and talked to festival goers about the importance of restoring Louisiana wetlands At the Restore the Mississippi River Delta table children got temporary tattoos of ghosts and monsters while they colored lively graphics of rougarous spiders and vampire bats that begged for their ecosystems to be protected The occasional zombie approached the table with a blank stare and slight growl The zombies seemed confused and angry that their Louisiana was underwater Their homes gone They could not believe that Louisiana is now losing a football field of land every hour Citizens participate in the Rougarou Parade in Houma Louisiana on October 25th 2014 At 6 p m four brave wetland warriors ran in the Rougarou Zombie Run They had to dodge dozens of zombies in order to survive the race Each warrior was given a belt with three flags Our team of wetland warriors made it out alive but was exhausted from sprinting from the enraged zombies At 7 p m the Krewe Ga Rou parade rolled with over thirty floats rolling through downtown Houma Children and adults alike lined the streets with jack o lanterns waiting for candy and the occasional spook The Restore the Mississippi River Delta campaign marched in the parade handing out nearly twenty pounds of candy and over 300 pledge cards which asked individuals to pledge to vote and to urge candidates to support coastal restoration Costumes were essential The Restore the Mississippi River Delta campaign marched as zombie football fans with signs reading Where s the Game Every Hour Louisiana Loses a Football Field of Land and Restore the Coast Protect Tradition These zombie football fans couldn t believe that one of Louisiana s greatest traditions football was being threatened The zombies seemed unable to find the Saints game as the football field had succumbed to the Gulf of Mexico Members of the Restore the Mississippi River Delta Campaign participate in the 2014 Rougarou Fest to raise awareness about Louisiana s disappearing wetlands These zombie football players are not happy about the disappearing wetlands Rougarou Fest was certainly a fun filled fall day in Houma I hope you all have a terrific Halloween and please be careful Avoid essential Rougarou habitat fields forests and swamps Happy Halloween No Comments The Beauty of the Louisiana Barrier Islands September 23 2014 Posted by Delta Dispatches in Hurricanes Meetings Events People Restoration Projects By Eden Davis Restore the Mississippi River Delta Campaign On September 12 I had the opportunity to travel to Raccoon Island one of the remaining barrier islands outside of Terrebonne Bay Raccoon Island was once part of the 25 mile long barrier island chain called Isles Dernieres or Last Islands Prior to the Last Island Hurricane of August 10 1856 Isles Dernieres was a famous resort destination When the Last Island Hurricane hit more than 200 people perished in the storm and the island was left void of vegetation The hurricane split the island into five smaller islands called East Trinity Whiskey Raccoon and Wine Islands On this beautiful summer day I traveled by boat with 18 other volunteers and employees from the Coalition to Restore Coastal Louisiana and the Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries 13 miles off the coast of Cocodrie to Raccoon Island As we left Terrebonne Bay we passed several shrimping boats and a distinctly large jack up rig that was heading offshore These were distinct reminders that Louisiana s coast is a working coast that provides our nation with oil and gas and some of the best seafood one can sink its teeth into Upon reaching the island we saw hundreds of pelicans Many were in the air some were in the water and others were on the island with their young whom were not yet able to fly As we trekked to the beach side of the island there were beautiful moon shells scattering the sand Our task was to install a one mile long sand fence This involved rolling out sections of the fence standing it up and nailing it to the already placed fence posts The sand fence will help to restore and protect 20 acres of the rapidly eroding shoreline of Raccoon Island The island chain used to be one large barrier island but years of erosion from hurricanes compounded with a loss of sediment from the Mississippi River have broken the island into the four that exist today The remaining islands continue to erode and without intervention like the sand fence project may wash away completely over the next several years The sand fence will directly protect critical nesting habitat for the pelicans and other seabirds that call these islands home The sand fence will also help to mitigate erosion Barrier islands are our communities first line of defense Storm surge during a hurricane will hit these islands before it hits our marshes and communities Barrier islands are beautiful but they are on the front lines of sea level rise and subsidence If we fail to restore them our grandchildren may never see their splendor Moreover the birds that call these islands home will be forced out of their habitat Brown pelicans the island s primary residents and our state bird are at great risk if these islands succumb to the Gulf s waters Brown pelicans do not migrate They stay in the mangroves the beaches and the shores As the Louisiana coast sinks into the Gulf the critical habitat for these beautiful birds is threatened If you have a Friday or Saturday free consider volunteering with the Coalition to Restore Coastal Louisiana They have regular marsh grass plantings dune restoration projects and other ecosystem protection and restoration projects available for volunteers Not only will you enjoy a beautiful

    Original URL path: http://www.mississippiriverdelta.org/blog/category/people/ (2016-05-01)
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  • Faces of the Delta | Restore the Mississippi River Delta
    connected to the land How has coastal land loss impacted your life We lost everything we had during Hurricane Katrina It was frightening to us We now realize that if we had the right protection the proper barriers wetlands we could protect our communities If nothing is done with the wetlands another Category Five will come and we ll be destroyed again While we rebuild our homes and our community we keep restoration at the forefront because it s all null and void if we don t restore our wetlands Why do you think coastal Louisiana restoration is important Sadly as someone who s organized for 40 some years I didn t understand the importance of coastal Louisiana land loss until Hurricane Katrina Then I began to understand what land loss means to us If nothing is done 40 years from now we won t have another Katrina because we won t even have land here to impact It s an integral part of everything we do not just for my own survival but for future generations What obstacles do you see hindering restoration Politics and policies Army Corps contracting for rebuilding and restoration is an obstacle We are networking with folks all around the area and the country to talk about coming together collectively to hold our government responsible and to advocate that the State takes out favoritism in contracting for restoration projects What do you fear losing if we don t restore the coast We lose our land We lose our homes We have a video about coastal restoration that we show to kids and one little girl is five years old and she said if we do nothing we will open our doors and we will walk in water We won t have a Plaquemines Parish if we don t restore the coast It will be underwater What do people around the country need to know about the Mississippi River Delta that they don t already know America needs to understand how vulnerable the Mississippi River and Gulf Coast are and the importance of this area The Gulf of Mexico is our nation s gateway to the world Seafood shipping energy it s very important to the country And it s not just Louisiana but the entire Gulf coast that needs to be restored because the whole country depends on the Gulf for our survival If we re going to have restoration we hope folks understand that it s important that people around the country get their representatives to support us We can t do it alone We need the help of the nation We need the whole Congress to support us Louisiana has a stigma It s not just let the good times roll it s much more than that We have some great people in Louisiana We want to change the image we are not all corrupt I feel good because I think we re getting a lot of support after Katrina and I think we are changing I want to build on the momentum to restore the coast No Comments Faces of the Delta Captain Ryan Lambert August 19 2011 Posted by Elizabeth Van Cleve in Faces of the Delta People By Amanda Moore National Wildlife Federation Next in our Faces of the Delta series you will meet Captain Lambert founder of Cajun Fishing Adventures charter boat captain lifetime South Louisiana resident and coastal restoration advocate Name Captain Ryan Lambert Location Buras Plaquemines Parish Louisiana Occupation Charter captain Board President Cajun Fishing Adventures Vice President Louisiana Charter Boat Association Tell me about your connection to south Louisiana I am South Louisiana I was born here I love the culture the people and the outdoors I live and breathe it I grew up in Luling and run Cajun Fishing Adventures one of the top five hunting and fishing lodges in North America Coastal restoration efforts are important because it can bring back a national treasure the richest fishing industry in North America It is a simple task Mother Nature made it you just have to release the Mississippi River back into the delta to restore the wetlands What does south Louisiana mean to you South Louisiana means a different way of life It is culture oriented People live off the land and make their living from their hands They share with others in the area It s unique What are your favorite things about the area My favorite thing is accessibility to an abundance of outdoor activities Nature is so vast here we have 41 of our nation s wetlands How has coastal land loss impacted your life When I think about it it brings a somber feeling to see what has happened to the richest estuary in North America It makes me sad that nothing has really started to fix it in 30 years We still have the top fishing in North America but I ve watched it decline over the years at a rapid rate It saddens me to know the next two or three generations won t be able to see what I ve seen Then there is Hurricane Katrina I had 24 feet of standing water in my fishing lodge It put me out of business for nine months The oil spill was a lot worse than Katrina for me I could rebuild after Katrina but the oil spill is impacting my business Business was down 94 last year and 75 this year I ve had to sue BP Really everyone had to sue in my industry No one was made whole Why do you think coastal restoration efforts are important Coastal restoration efforts are important because it can bring back a national treasure the richest fishing industry in North America It is a simple task Mother Nature made it you just have to release the Mississippi River back into the delta to restore the wetlands Doing this tackles the coastal land loss the dead zone and reduces greenhouse gases Losing the wetlands affects everything in the ecosystem Everyone is connected to this land For instance if you re hunting ducks in Canada you re impacted Without the wintering habitat it goes The shrimp the crabs the oysters they go What obstacles do you see hindering restoration The Army Corps of Engineers and oystermen What do you fear losing if we don t take action to restore coastal Louisiana I fear losing Louisiana We ve already lost one fourth of Southeast Louisiana It won t be long before we lose New Orleans because there are no wetlands left to protect us We ll lose a national treasure if they don t get going with it soon What should people around the country know about efforts to rebuild New Orleans and surrounding communities and protect this area from another powerful storm that they don t know right now People need to understand how they are connected to the Mississippi River Delta Most people don t realize that if we lose the navigation route along the river due to the coastal land loss everyone will be impacted because of the shipping implications It will cost the nation billions of dollars Our wetlands save the nation money in storm surge and infrastructure protection as well as wildlife habitat No Comments Faces of the Delta Father Vien August 9 2011 Posted by Elizabeth Van Cleve in Faces of the Delta People By Amanda Moore National Wildlife Federation Next in our Faces of the Delta series you will meet Father Vien Vietnam refugee New Orleans priest urban gardener and coastal restoration advocate Name Father Vien The Nguyen Location New Orleans East Occupation Chairman of the Board for Mary Queen of Viet Nam MQVN Community Development Corporation former priest at Mary Queen of Vietnam Church in New Orleans Father Vien talking about the MQVN Church I think we are probably the most international parish in New Orleans We have Caucasian Americans Latino Americans Vietnamese and African Americans in this parish It s trilingual Our masses are trilingual one in Vietnamese one in English and one in Spanish Tell me about your connection to south Louisiana What brought you to the area I was born in Vietnam I came here in 1975 with the fall of the south Vietnam First my family settled in southeast Missouri from 1975 to summer of 1977 Then we moved to New Orleans I was 11 years old when I first arrived in America so in many ways I grew up here I attended junior high high school college and graduate school here We came here because we were very isolated in Missouri We were the only Vietnamese family in probably a 30 mile radius We didn t know any English at all We had no transportation I think the important aspects of coastal restoration are the protection from storm surge habitat for wildlife and the livelihood of people We visited New Orleans in 1976 to visit the Vietnamese priest who was our chaplain in our refugee camp in Arkansas It was a very heart warming experience because there was a large number of Vietnamese in the area We felt very at home because of the language So we decided to move here in 1977 What does south Louisiana mean to you It s home in many ways It s home because as a priest with the Archdiocese of New Orleans I have a commitment to New Orleans and the church has a commitment to me We are committed to each other and I am bound to New Orleans for the rest of my life My family grew up here Part of the Vietnamese culture is that the land is very important because that is where we bury our loved ones I remember a story with respect to New Orleans East someone was talking about moving away and the response was you can t this is where we buried our dead What are your favorite things about the area The food is exciting I like the overall atmosphere It s very relaxed compared to other locations About half of my assignments have been in open areas I don t like the city I come from a farming family We like open areas New Orleans East Mary Queen of Vietnam s location is more open than the rest of the city East of this church is 28 acres We have an urban farming initiative The farms will go on the 28 acres One well known chef here John Besh is interested in buying from us Some others are interested as well How has coastal land loss impacted your life The wetlands weaken storm surges My understanding is that right now we are sitting next to Lake Borgne It used to be that wetlands were some 50 miles from here Now they re just a few miles 7 or 8 Also the community itself has changed We lost some people We lost only one to death We lost some people to evacuation There are people who have not returned a few hundred We have recovered about 95 of our homes As of now New Orleans East has no hospital We used to have two hospitals in New Orleans East We have none at this point So we really have to fend for ourselves It s easily an hour with typical traffic to be picked up and taken to the hospital in an ambulance That s why we ve established our own clinics And we rebuilt our own school In many ways what we ve been trying to do this to create a normalcy and a resiliency If in the future something like Katrina were to happen again we will be the ones that decide whether our clinics open or our schools open The mom and pop stores have returned quite quickly The nearest major grocery store is probably 10 miles from here and that didn t open until about two or three years after Katrina Why do you think coastal restoration efforts are important What do you think are the most crucial aspects of Mississippi River Delta restoration I think the important aspects are the protection from storm surge habitat for wildlife and the livelihood of people I m talking about oysters talking about shrimping talking about crabbing fishing etc Losing that is losing a major aspect of the food industry What obstacles do you see hindering restoration Two obstacles One Education So that people can learn more about it and know the dynamics The other obstacle is funding Since it costs a lot there has to be a passionate will to carry it out and to say This is important This is something we need to do What do you fear losing if we don t take action to restore coastal Louisiana Losing this place Cities people and all of that which has sustained people throughout the U S and New Orleans The land loss will continue The erosion will continue Where does it stop There has to be an agreement between the storms and the people or it will continue to carve into this nation No Comments Faces of the Delta Justin Mack July 28 2011 Posted by Elizabeth Van Cleve in Faces of the Delta By Amanda Moore National Wildlife Federation Next in our Faces of the Delta series you will meet Justin Mack New Orleans native environmental educator and restoration advocate Name Justin Mack Location Lower 9th Ward New Orleans Louisiana Occupation Science Coordinator at Martin Luther King Jr Charter School in the Lower 9th Ward Tell me about your connection to south Louisiana I was born in New Orleans and moved to Houston as a child I came back to New Orleans for grad school at LSU in February 2005 and I have family here Restoration is most important because it protects people and the community from future flooding and disaster It maintains human life What does south Louisiana mean to you South Louisiana is the cultural heart of the state It s a major economic and cultural heart of the south What are your favorite things about the area I enjoy the laid back lifestyle food and fun How has coastal land loss impacted your life The destruction of Hurricane Katrina I started grad school the month Hurricane Katrina came and I worked in the East Jefferson Hospital at night My school was uprooted and moved to Baton Rouge I lived in the hospital for a month sleeping in a hospital room I came to MLK School in the Spring of 2008 Today the students are more aware of their environment Why do you think coastal restoration efforts are important Restoration is most important because it protects people and the community from future flooding and disaster It maintains human life What obstacles do you see hindering restoration Lack of funding and mistrust of the Army Corps and government in New Orleans What do you fear losing if we don t take action to restore coastal Louisiana The ability to recover because people will lose their fight and the nation will lose interest What should people around the country know about efforts to rebuild New Orleans and surrounding communities and protect this area from another powerful storm that they don t know right now Where someone chooses to live somewhere it s their right to live there No one s home or community is more important than others How do you think restoring the wetlands will help the people and the economy of coastal Louisiana the state the nation The fishing industry would be helped because you restore ecosystems to bring back fish crustaceans and other wildlife Restoring the coast also creates green jobs It will also give people confidence in their home so they will feel comfortable and safe It will be good for people to see things getting done restore confidence in the government No Comments Faces of the Delta John Koeferl July 14 2011 Posted by Elizabeth Van Cleve in Faces of the Delta People In the fourth installment of our Faces of the Delta series you will meet John Koeferl retired carpenter and environmental advocate fighting to protect the wetland of our nation By Amanda Moore National Wildlife Federation Name John Koeferl Location Holy Cross Gentilly Terrace New Orleans Louisiana Occupation Retired carpenter environmental advocate Tell me about your connection to south Louisiana I came to New Orleans for graduate school at Tulane and stayed here from then on loved the city I raised my family for 20 years in Holy Cross a neighborhood in the Lower 9th Ward and moved to Gentilly Terrace 10 days before Hurricane Katrina John and his wife kept their home in Holy Cross and are still very active in the neighborhood association there John Koeferl Restoration is important because the Mississippi River Delta is the wetland of our nation What does south Louisiana mean to you South Louisiana means home New Orleans is a special place for me a unique place on earth It is not boring nothing is straightforward What are your favorite things about the area The trees streets houses neighborhoods I gradually grew to know and appreciate the culture and people I got involved in politics as a regional planner for historical and archeological sites and was so impressed with the detail and craftsmanship How has coastal land loss impacted your life It s been awful We lost our home in Lower Nine our neighborhood Almost everyone we knew was affected Every house was flooded We weren t protected We knew it was going to happen but no one would listen The Army Corps has an abusive process that favors special interests but that doesn t mean we re giving up Why do you think coastal restoration efforts are important Restoration is important because the Mississippi River Delta is the wetland of our nation The estuary is important People have lived here for generations making their living

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  • Profiles in Resilience | Restore the Mississippi River Delta
    by noon Sunday on Sept 25 th the 45 mph wind finally fell to a breeze and the water levels began to decrease If the storm had made landfall closer to Lafayette or any place east of Lafayette we may have had serious flooding in the South Lafourche system Aggressively building and raising the levee through the years allowed our area to work successfully with the 8 to 9 ft of water against the levee In fact the protected area of South Lafourche was one of the only areas to avoid flooding in 2005 Good levees and good luck South Lafourche needed both to survive 2005 Windell A Curole General Manager South Lafourche Levee District Join us tomorrow September 23 in Houma for an expert panel discussion with state and local leaders on restoration and recovery 10 years after Rita Details here You can also show your support for coastal restoration by taking the pledge to urge leaders to be a powerful voice for coastal restoration Take the pledge at RestoretheCoast org No Comments Profiles in Resilience ORA Estuaries wins 2014 Water Challenge business pitch at New Orleans Entrepreneur Week April 14 2014 Posted by Elizabeth Van Cleve in Economics People Profiles in Resilience Restoration Projects By Keenan Orfalea Communications Intern Environmental Defense Fund Last month ORA Estuaries took first place in the 2014 Water Challenge business pitch competition at New Orleans Entrepreneur Week The Baton Rouge based company beat out four other startups to claim the prize which included 50 000 in seed money as well as free office space and legal counsel for a year This support will help the company to expand the use of its innovative products and services in restoring Louisiana s wetlands Tyler Ortego president and founder of ORA Estuaries ORA Estuaries provides engineering scientific and regulatory consulting services as well as project implementation for clients including local state and federal governments The company s primary products are the patented OysterBreak and OysterKrete technologies The OysterBreak and OysterKrete technologies were originally developed in Louisiana to address Louisiana s coastal land loss said Tyler Ortego president and founder of the company This prize package combined with recent project successes is critical to allowing ORA Estuaries to export that success to other areas of the country and world ORA s innovative technologies are specifically designed to facilitate the protection restoration and healthy growth of coastal estuaries OysterBreak is designed to use the gregarious shell building nature to form a living coastal protection structure The system has proven more effective than alternative rock structures By employing these tools ORA Estuaries is able to accomplish its primary goals of stabilizing shoreline and enhancing marine ecosystems Small Oysterbreak Credit ORA Estuaries While ORA Estuaries may be a startup Ortego has years of experience working in coastal engineering and natural resource management He is a Graduate of Louisiana State University and holds B S and M S degrees in Biological Engineering as well as being both a professional engineer and a certified oyster biologist with the state s Oyster Lease Damage Evaluation Board He started his career consulting on wetland restoration flood protection and mitigation projects around Louisiana and the Gulf Coast before founding ORA Estuaries Since then the company has participated in a number of large scale plans involving the study and design of oyster reefs and various other aquatic environments Through the success of these projects Mr Ortego hopes they will become the new definition of a living shoreline Thanks to winning the Water Challenge business pitch ORA Estuaries plans to use its innovator prize monies to help market their OysterBreak technology as a solution to coastal restoration experts internationally No Comments Profiles in Coastal Restoration Allied Concrete Company August 5 2013 Posted by Rachel Schott in Economics Profiles in Resilience Restoration Projects Seafood By Will Lindsey Environmental Defense Fund Allied Concrete Company a 68 year old firm based in Charlottesville Va is creating new business opportunities by partnering with conservation groups to deploy miles of new oyster reefs along the Gulf Coast These reefs are composed of an innovative concrete product and create both a restored ecosystem habitat as well as a new business opportunity for Allied Concrete Allied Concrete builds Oyster Castles to battle declining oyster populations in coastal regions Photo Credit Allied Concrete Co In 2011 the 100 1000 Coalition began implementing a project to build 100 miles of oyster reefs in Alabama which would then support more than 1 000 acres of marshland Coalition member organizations include Mobile Baykeeper The Nature Conservancy The Alabama Coastal Foundation Weeks Bay Foundation Dauphin Island Sea Lab The Ocean Foundation Alabama Wildlife Foundation and Coastal Conservation Association A displaced Louisianan Allied Concrete company president Gus Lorber has a passion for saving the Gulf I grew up in Louisiana and worked played and fished in the Louisiana and Mississippi Gulf Coast area my entire life said Lorber I have seen firsthand the degradation of the coastal wetlands in that area my entire life Founded in 1945 Allied traditionally made concrete blocks but the company has since diversified its product range in response to ever changing markets and customer needs Notably in 2007 Allied joined forces with The Nature Conservancy and others to develop a solution to the declining oyster populations in coastal regions The result of this partnership was the Oyster Castle which is a concrete unit by Allied specially designed to build oyster reefs The unit is made of a certified blend of proprietary material conducive to attracting and fostering oyster settlement attachment and growth Oyster Castles create habitats and also help to slow coastline erosion Photo Credit Allied Concrete Co Significantly the Oyster Castle has received a gold Cradle to Cradle certification for its environmentally friendly design With Gulf Coast restoration projects likely to ramp up in response to potential monies flowing as a result of the Deepwater Horizon Disaster Allied s business is expected to increase I firmly believe that as the RESTORE Act monies become available the monies should be spent on creating economies in the home states and we are prepared to license local manufacturers to make our units to accomplish this goal says Lorber Allied is proud to be making a product that has a positive impact in the Gulf Coast Besides being my passion all of my employees love what we are doing with Oyster Castles said Lorber They feel good about this company for helping the environment they feel good about their part in making a product that plays a part in this and they always volunteer for whatever hair brained scheme I come up with to make products that do good things In addition to providing habitat oyster reef restoration projects provide numerous environmental benefits including water filtration habitat for other marine life storm surge attenuation and erosion control No Comments Profiles in Coastal Restoration HESCO Bastion July 18 2013 Posted by Delta Dispatches in BP Oil Disaster Profiles in Resilience Restoration Projects RESTORE Act By Will Lindsey Environmental Defense Fund Louisiana based company HESCO Bastion Environmental Inc is at the forefront of business innovations in response to the growing market for coastal restoration projects Finding new uses for established products the company is now involved in creating artificial oyster reefs and protective structures for wetlands This arena of work is expected to expand and create more jobs in coastal communities as the RESTORE Act funds and other monies from the BP oil spill begin to flow The Louisiana National Guard constructs a wall of sand filled Hesco Concertainer units in Cameron La to help keep oil tainted water in the Gulf of Mexico from moving inland June 22 2010 U S Army HESCO s original product the Concertainer is a barrier system that consists of galvanized welded mesh framed baskets complete with a non woven geotextile liner The product is offered in different dimensions and when properly assembled and filled with substrate such as sand creates a system of walls of exceptional strength and integrity In the past the Concertainer has been used primarily for flood protection and by the U S armed forces as a barrier against force Now in the face of coastal erosion in the Gulf Coast the Concertainer has been adapted to take on the challenge of coastal restoration The aptly named Concertainer Delta Unit maintains the original shape and design of the Concertainer but adds front unlined compartments These front compartments which alternate between rectangular and triangular shapes can be filled with materials such as oyster shells that provide habitat for aquatic organisms The lined section can be filled with other substrates that encourage coastal plant life to be established This allows for the restoration of coastal environments by creating a living shoreline Working with the University of New Orleans HESCO demonstrated that the Concertainer could be used as an effective coastal restoration tool by helping to rebuild degraded shoreline near New Orleans Currently with the potential for millions of dollars in funding to be directed to coastal restoration through the RESTORE Act and other payments from the BP oil spill coastal restoration companies like HESCO could see a significant growth in business Our products provide a low cost solution to a wide range of coastal restoration and protection challenges from oyster reef construction to flood protection said Stephanie Victory president of HESCO Bastion Environmental Inc We have completed projects all over the world from emergency flood responses in Thailand to building HESCO Delta Unit oyster reefs just north of Gulf Shores Ala We are thrilled that the RESTORE Act passage will create more opportunities for jobs and coastal restoration efforts back home in Louisiana and across the Gulf region 1 Comment Profiles in Resilience Royal Engineering Consultants LLC May 9 2013 Posted by Delta Dispatches in Profiles in Resilience By Kaitlin Brown Environmental Defense Fund We look at coastal restoration as the future of our company Dwayne Bernal CEO Royal Engineering Dwayne Bernal CEO Royal Engineering Royal Engineering Consultants LLC Royal a New Orleans based engineering and consulting firm is one of the many innovative businesses committed to rebuilding the Gulf Coast after the 2010 Gulf oil disaster Led by CEO Dwayne Bernal Royal is dedicated to serving the public in a way that focuses not only on individual projects but also on rebuilding strong local communities The company s 75 employees work in a variety of areas including civil engineering construction management program project management environmental services energy services and coastal engineering Passage of last year s RESTORE Act is expected to provide significant new funding for coastal restoration This infusion will in turn benefit local companies like Royal and provide opportunities for them to grow The RESTORE Act provides a catalytic opportunity for our nation to create and protect jobs not only along the Gulf Coast but in communities across the country that will provide materials technologies and services for ecosystem restoration says Dwayne We look at coastal restoration as the future of our company Royal s coastal engineering services include but are not limited to planning and design of ecosystem restoration projects hydraulic and hydrodynamic modeling shoreline protection beneficial use of dredged material marsh creation design and barrier island restoration As coastal restoration funding is allocated to the Gulf Coast states as directed through the RESTORE Act more projects like these will be approved creating job and business growth opportunities for companies like Royal Engineering Royal Engineering s office in New Orleans Bernal who was born and raised in New Orleans formed Royal in 2005 after witnessing the devastating effects of Hurricane Katrina on his hometown I worked in the engineering field for several local companies and then Hurricane Katrina hit and I saw that basically as an opportunity to take that entrepreneurial spirit that I had within me and start my own organization said Dwayne One week after Hurricane Katrina with 15 employees Dwayne created Royal Engineering Initially the company assisted with hurricane cleanup working on debris removal and quality assurance But as time went by Dwayne diversified Royal and added additional services and areas of expertise Following the devastation of Katrina Dwayne realized that restoration of the Gulf was going to take more time and effort than anyone had predicted and that everyone would need to play a role in order to restore the region and create a more sustainable environment for the future Like so many other people throughout the Gulf Coast Dwayne recognizes that the future of his beloved city and the Mississippi River Delta depends on the restoration efforts of companies like Royal Engineering And Royal isn t planning on leaving New Orleans or the business of coastal restoration any time soon No Comments Profiles in Resilience Ecology and Environment Inc July 10 2012 Posted by Elizabeth Van Cleve in BP Oil Disaster Hurricane Katrina Job Creation Profiles in Resilience Restoration Projects RESTORE Act This is the next in our Profiles in Resilience series highlighting companies that work on coastal restoration in the Mississippi River Delta and Gulf Coast By Audrey Payne Environmental Defense Fund Ecology and Environment Inc E E is an environmental consulting firm that was founded in 1970 and prides itself on its ability to get the most environmental bang for your buck A few of their projects include helping countries around the world write environmental policy working on environmental issues through social and political turmoil oil embargoes and environmental disasters and helping to restore the Gulf Coast Environmental restoration has become a major part of E E s work and the company has paired up with several non profit organizations on projects including The Nature Conservancy National Fish and Wildlife Foundation National Audubon Society Riverkeeper and a few land trust organizations The company s goal is to remain ahead of the curve in environmentally sustainable practices and it has been instrumental in not only carrying out restoration projects in the Gulf of Mexico but also in planning them The Gulf Coast is everyone s responsibility says Bill Hudson of Ecology and Environment We are particularly pleased that Congress has finally passed the RESTORE Act Beyond directing much needed funding to the gulf the legislation does a great job of integrating ecological and economic recovery and making sure that projects across the region are planned coordinated and managed using the best available science and ecosystem based and adaptive management approaches Ecology and Environment Inc A philosophy of sustainability Ecology and Environment Inc headquartered in Lancaster N Y has offices in 43 cities across the United States including one in Baton Rouge La as well as 17 more offices throughout the world The company has worked in just about every ecosystem imaginable from the arctic to the tropics and it employs over 1 150 experts in 85 different science and engineering disciplines contributing to its multidisciplinary approach to problem solving The company strives to promote economic and human development in an environmentally sustainable manner and says that sustainability is the culture in which we live work and conduct business it extends from our local neighborhoods to the global community Ecology and Environment Inc offers services in several markets including power government oil and natural gas renewable energy and mining One of its points of pride is its approach to ecological and ecosystem management Hudson says an example of E E s expertise in ecosystem management is its work with oyster beds Anybody could go out and build an oyster bed explains Hudson But you don t want to build an oyster bed in water that s not good for growing oysters If there s too much sediment or if the water s not right or you re destroying a bed of seagrass to put in the oysters then they re not going to grow like you want them to and it s not worth it That s why we do a lot of planning testing and assessing before we actually take action Ecology and Environment and the Gulf of Mexico Before Hurricane Katrina and the BP oil disaster of 2010 wetland restoration in the Gulf of Mexico had not been a main priority of the nation even though it is well documented that wetlands provide storm and flood protection to communities and natural areas as well as habitat for wildlife and seafood However those two disasters put restoring the gulf on the nation s radar and E E has been heavily involved post disaster Hudson points out that E E staff has attended almost every gulf restoration conference since the BP oil spill After Hurricanes Katrina and Rita E E worked with the U S Environmental Protection Agency the Army Corps of Engineers and the state of Louisiana to document damage to coastal wetlands They conducted habitat analyses to find out where the most damage had been done and they also helped develop restoration plans in several national wildlife refuges such as Sabine Cameron Prairie Big Branch Marsh and Bayou Sauvage to diminish the negative effects of storm damage The Mississippi River Delta acts as an incredibly important habitat for waterfowl and this habitat has been put at risk by damaged wetlands and strong storms In collaboration with Arcadis E E worked with the Louisiana Office of Coastal Protection and Restoration OCPR on the Innovative Dredging Initiative project The purpose of the project was to develop a plan to look at new contracting techniques and bidding methods that could reduce the cost and streamline the design of constructing restoration projects E E also led the development of the Inland Marsh Restoration Plan for Louisiana and investigated new dredging contracting techniques and bidding methods that could reduce costs while streamlining the design of dredging projects These projects included a study proposal on alternatives to dumping dredged soil into upland confined disposal facilities CDFs or into the Gulf of Mexico The U S Army Corps of Engineers is required to dispose of sediment dredged during the maintenance of waterways in the most cost effective way

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  • Tributes | Restore the Mississippi River Delta
    We Are What We Do Meet Our Experts Contact Upcoming Events Support Restoration Sign up Take Action Protect The Funding Volunteer RELATED SOURCES Archive for Tributes Tribute to Dr Gregory Stone February 23 2011 Posted by Delta Dispatches in Tributes By Angelina Freeman Environmental Defense Fund Dr Greg Stone Dr Greg Stone a highly valued professor in the Department of Oceanography and Coastal Sciences at Louisiana State University LSU and director of LSU s Coastal Studies Institute CSI passed away on Thursday Feb 17 at the age of 53 Dr Stone was an internationally respected coastal scientist whose research interests included waves coastal morphyodynamics and numerical modeling of sediment transport His interest in the oceanic processes that drive changes in coasts of different types made him a perfect fit for CSI and its 50 year history of similar research work wrote Dr Harry Roberts a friend and colleague of Dr Stone As part of his research he and the CSI Field Support Group developed a series of offshore instrumented stations to monitor wind waves and currents that impact the Louisiana coast These Wave Current Information System WAVCIS stations produce data that may be accessed on the Internet and used by

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  • Voices of the Delta | Restore the Mississippi River Delta
    and began charter fishing in 2002 After entering the charter fishing fleet I noticed that there were a lot of anglers who were overharvesting reef fish simply because they could I wanted to be different and develop my niche I began educating my customers about conservation and why it is important to release some of your catch I had already seen what overfishing had done to the resources since childhood so I decided to be part of the solution instead of being part of the problem I began marketing Keep the Best Release the Rest to help manage fish populations The effects of the BP oil spill have complicated our fishery rebuilding process It may be years before we know the full effects of what the oil and dispersants did to our reef fishery and the deep water marine ecosystem Why is it important to move quickly to restore all coastal wetlands and estuaries Over the years our pristine coastal areas have been depleted and are in jeopardy of being gone for good With natural events like hurricanes and manmade events like the BP oil spill it is extremely important that we all do our part and build buffers around and restore our marine resources The lessons I have learned in 40 years are valuable and I don t want to see future generations witness what we had a chance to correct How does the RESTORE Act fit into this process For the first time in our nation s history we have an opportunity to divert Clean Water Act fines without using taxpayer dollars toward projects that will protect our estuaries and marine resources from natural or manmade disasters The RESTORE Act gives hope to all of us who make our living by educating and being good stewards of such a great national resource It may be years before we know the full effects of what the BP oil spill did to our marine environment Only through a robust research and monitoring program will we be able to detect delayed or subtle impacts track the recovery of the injured species and implement appropriate restoration strategies One thing s for sure the seafood industry and recreational fishing are pillars of our coastal economy Neither can prosper without the natural resources that support them In the gulf environmental restoration is vital to economic restoration What we do today will have an effect on what happens tomorrow Your children and grandchildren will love you more because of it Restoration is the right thing to do No Comments Voices of the Delta Keith Blomstrom February 14 2012 Posted by Kevin Chandler in BP Oil Disaster Hunting and Fishing Hurricane Katrina RESTORE Act Voices of the Delta The Minnesota state bird the Common Loon spends two to three years maturing in the gulf To Minnesotans this bird represents wilderness and it also links us to the Mississippi River Delta Keith Blomstrom This is the second post of our Voices of the Delta series Name Keith

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  • Reports | Restore the Mississippi River Delta
    output economic activity at risk from land loss 10 133 billion Increase in storm damage to capital stock 5 51 billion Total output lost to increased storm damage Every dollar we spend today on coastal restoration and protection will save us many many more dollars in the future said CPRA Board Chairman Chip Kline in a press release But beyond being cost feasible we re talking about saving lives families homes business and our way of life This study by LSU and RAND is important in making our case to Congress and the nation that it is better for many reasons to spend now rather than later Read the full report on CPRA s website here The Times Picayune video Coastal erosion hurricane could cost Louisiana 133 billion Learn more about how coastal restoration is important to the economy at OurCoastOurEconomy org No Comments A Decade after Katrina Groups Issue Recommendations for Community Protection Restoration August 11 2015 Posted by lbourg in Community Resiliency Media Resources Mississippi River Gulf Outlet Reports Restoration Projects Science FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Contact Samantha Carter National Wildlife Federation 504 264 6831 carters nwf org Emily Guidry Schatzel National Wildlife Federation 225 253 9781 schatzele nwf org Raleigh Hoke Gulf Restoration Network 573 795 1916 raleigh healthygulf org A Resilient Sustainable New Orleans A Decade after Katrina Groups Issue Recommendations for Community Protection Restoration New Orleans August 11 2015 To commemorate the upcoming 10 th anniversary of Hurricane Katrina a coalition of local community and conservation advocacy groups working to restore wetlands around the Mississippi River Gulf Outlet MRGO released a new report today The MRGO Must Go Coalition s report titled 10 th Anniversary of Katrina Making New Orleans a Sustainable Delta City for the Next Century reflects on the progress that has been made since Hurricane Katrina and offers recommendations for ensuring the full protection and long term resiliency of the Greater New Orleans communities including implementing a Multiple Lines of Defense Strategy to protect coastal communities and wetland habitat In conjunction with the report release members of the MRGO Must Go Coalition released the following statement today Hurricane Katrina brought to the forefront the dire need to improve the resilience of New Orleans and its coastal neighbors Katrina barreled onshore churned through MRGO and wreaked havoc in the Greater New Orleans area showing us that levees alone are not enough to protect our people natural resources and economy Today our coastline continues to disappear at the alarming rate of a football field every hour As coastal wetlands wash away with them go our natural defenses Healthy wetlands and barrier islands serve as natural buffers defending us against storms Without slowing down this land loss crisis we will continue to be vulnerable to storms sea level rise and the growing risks of climate change Ten years later we have made great strides toward both restoration and protection The closure of MRGO the passing of the 2012 Louisiana Coastal Master Plan the adoption of an Urban Water Plan and major upgrades to structural protections like levees and storm surge barriers are all true marks of progress for our region However the critical work to achieve protection and resiliency is really just beginning We must continue to implement a Multiple Lines of Defense Strategy against storms including community level planning and preparedness urban storm water management and protecting and restoring our coastal wetlands We must build on the momentum of the last decade and continue to work to make New Orleans a model city for restoration resiliency and sustainability The MRGO Must Go Coalition was founded in 2006 in response to Hurricanes Katrina and Rita The Co alition s mission is to ensure that the wetlands affected by the MRGO are carefully restored in a timely manner As of August 2015 the MRGO Must Go Coalition included 17 local and national environmental social justice and community organizations Since its inception the Coalition has served as a liaison between the communities in Orleans and St Bernard parishes and the US Army Corps of Engineers and other government agencies The vast orga nizational resources and expertise provided by the member organizations allow the Coalition to make informed policy and scientific recommendations on the restoration of the ecosystem impacted by the MRGO More information can be found at www MRGOmustGO org Central Wetlands No Comments LPBF Assesses Upgraded Hurricane Protection System for Greater New Orleans Eastbank June 18 2015 Posted by lbourg in Hurricane Katrina Hurricanes K10 Reports Science By Ezra Boyd PhD Disastermap net LLC The Hurricane Surge Risk Reduction System As we approach the 10 th anniversary of Hurricane Katrina and the associated levee failures the people of the Greater New Orleans GNO region face constant reminders that our safety and viability depend on a complex system made of numerous elements that together mitigate risks from hurricane induced tidal floods The near constant construction of levees pumps and floodgates over the last decade provides the most visible evidence of this system Together these components are termed the structural lines of defense In addition work on other important but less visible components have also reduced our flood risk Broadly speaking the other two major components are the coastal lines of defense and the community lines of defense Together these three components comprise the Multiple Lines of Defense Strategy for Sustaining Coastal Louisiana MLODS Beyond a list of 12 separate lines of defense see figure below MLODS represents a system that allows us to use the professional tools and standards of systems engineering to assess the current status of storm surge risk reduction Within the field of systems engineering a system is defined as an integrated set of elements segments and or subsystems that accomplish a defined objective The 12 lines of defense make up the elements of the system and systems engineering helps us figure out if they function in an integrated fashion to accomplish the objective of managing storm surge risk A recent report from the Lake Pontchartrain Basin Foundation called A Systems Engineering Based Assessment of The Greater New Orleans Hurricane Surge Defense System Using the Multiple Lines of Defense Framework provides a detailed assessment of the current system of levees pumps gates coastal landscape features and community resilience steps that the region depends upon to manage storm surge flooding risk System Interactions and Factors of Concern Once the Hurricane Surge Defense System HSDS has been specified as a system the tools of systems engineering then allow us to identify system interactions that create major factors of concern A system interaction refers to when the performance of one system element is impacted by the other elements while a factor of concern is an element or interaction between elements that could potentially reduce the system performance The report identified and described a number of system interactions and factors of concern Two of the major concerns are with the Foot of the Twin Spans bridge and the IHNC GIWW navigation canal shown here Both result from interactions between systems elements that affect evacuation effectiveness I 10 East Evacuation Route Chandeleur Islands Interstate 10 is a major evacuation route During peak evacuation an estimated 2 000 vehicles per hour utilize its eastbound lanes to escape GNO These eastbound lanes cross Lake Pontchartrain on the edge of New Orleans Since Hurricane Katrina the bridge locally known as the Twin Spans has been rebuilt in an 800 million project that raised the bridge to 30 feet above sea level Not far from the bridge is the rebuilt levee system that provides perimeter protection for GNO Between the levee and foot of the bridge is an approximately 1 mile section of interstate that is at ground level and outside the levee system Most of this section of highway is 7 8 feet above sea level However just before the foot of the bridge atop of narrow peninsula that has experienced landloss on all three sides the highway dips to around 6 7 feet above sea level This low unprotected section of a major evacuation route is prone to flooding early during storm surge events thus blocking any further evacuation The Chandeleur Islands a rapidly eroding barrier island chain are located some 60 miles from the foot of the Twin Spans bridge Yet how they perform as a coastal line of defense affects the performance of the I 10 East evacuation route Hydrological studies have determined that the elevation and integrity of the Chandeleurs influences the timing and height of the peak surge with the surge peaking 1 5 feet higher and 1 hour sooner if the islands continue to erode Exemplifying the concept of system interactions the Chandeleur s ability to mitigate storm surge impacts the available window of time to evacuate people using the eastbound I 10 IHNC GIWW Closure Operations Vessel Evacuation and Vehicular Evacuation The Inner Harbor Navigation Canal IHNC and Gulf Intracoastal Watery GIWW are two manmade navigation canals within the eastern half of GNO During Hurricane Katrina they were major conveyance pathways for storm surge and also the location of numerous levee breeches Since Hurricane Katrina the area has been subject to major levee upgrades along with newly constructed floodwalls and floodgates While these structural improvements provide a potentially much improved level of protection the gates in particular create a new set of concerns related to system behavior They also provide another example of asystem interaction that also affects evacuation effectiveness Simply put closing the gates in anticipation of a tropical system is a complicated procedure that must be coordinated with navigational interests railroads and the Port of New Orleans Most navigational vessels are required to evacuate the IHNC GIWW before a hurricane This in turn requires that the vessels pass under a number of drawbridges Since the drawbridges must be opened to let vessels pass they then hinder vehicular evacuation of the general population Here the operations of these structural components the flood gates along these two canals impact the performance of the evacuation component another example of a system interaction that creates a major factor of concern Conclusion These are just two of many factors of concern with the current HSDS Our report documents others some small and others major Maintenance long term funding coordination and public risk communication were the major themes uncovered in our study Because it is important for the public and policymakers to understand the true level of protection LPBF continues to build on the momentum create by this report As step toward addressing some of the issues identified in the report we have recently launched the Pontchartrain Maurepas Surge Consortium to facilitate regional collaboration between levees boards floodplains managers coastal scientists and others engaged in storm surge management and risk reduction The report along with LPBF s continuing efforts at implementing MLODS for coastal flood protection has been funded by the Kresge Foundation Additional resources LPBF MLODS Reports LPBF s Systems Engineering Report Systems Engineering Presentation to Southeast Louisiana Flood Protection Authority East International Council on System Engineering INCOSE 2012 State Master Plan Hydrological Study of Chandeleur Islands Impact of Storm Surge Interaction of Barrier Islands and Storms Implications for Flood Risk Reduction in Louisiana and Mississippi No Comments Hydrocoast Maps Monitor Changes in Mississippi River Estuaries June 4 2015 Posted by lbourg in Reports Science By John Lopez Ph D Coastal Sustainability Program Director Lake Pontchartrain Basin Foundation The Lake Pontchartain Basin Foundation LPBF is releasing a report describing the methodology of its Hydrocoast Maps program a research effort that began in 2012 and monitors water flow salinity and other factors to better understand the Mississippi River estuary in the Pontchartrain Basin What are the Hydrocoast Maps Hydrocoast Map The Hydrocoast Maps monitor the distribution of salinity changes in water quality and other pertinent information across the Pontchartrain Basin to provide an ongoing relevant and accurate assessment of basin conditions LPBF produces a biweekly map series that displays information on salinity freshwater discharge water quality impairments fisheries activity and a variety of estuarine related information The Hydrocoast Maps provide a snapshot of the condition of the estuary such as the distribution of saline to fresh water and other relevant factors LPBF s goal is for the maps to be useful to a diverse audience including the general public but more specifically commercial and recreational fishers state and federal agency personnel making restoration decisions scientists and academics The biweekly Hydrocoast Map products and what they analyze include Salinity Map isohalines lines on maps connecting points of equal salinity and freshwater inflows Biological Map fisheries fleets and closures Habitat Map wetland classification and soil salinity Water Quality Map water quality impairments and fecal coliform counts Weather Map cumulative rainfall wind and tide data Current and archived Hydrocoast Maps can be found here The Mississippi River Estuary On the Louisiana coast fresh water from rainfall and rivers flows seaward and mixes with salt water from the Gulf of Mexico resulting in a coastal zone called an estuary This estuarine system also coincides with the extensive deltaic wetland plain of the Mississippi River and gives rise to Louisiana s valuable and productive working coast There are many factors that affect this estuary such as pollution fisheries hydrologic alterations wetland loss and freshwater inflows These influences are dynamic and the estuary is shifting daily but it is also undergoing long term changes For example since 1932 these wetlands have been converting to open water at an unnatural and alarming rate giving rise to Louisiana s coastal wetland crisis Understanding all of these natural and manmade influences on the estuary is important for local recreational and commercial fisheries as well as for restoration scientists who may gain a deeper understanding of how the estuary functions and its trajectory of change Change is inevitable but we should use the best available data to work with the deltaic system and bring about comprehensive restoration of the Mississippi River Delta No Comments NOAA Study Confirms BP Oil Spill Led to Dolphin Deaths in Northern Gulf of Mexico May 20 2015 Posted by lbourg in 5 Years Later BP Oil Disaster Media Resources NOAA Reports Science FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Contact Emily Guidry Schatzel National Wildlife Federation 225 253 9781 schatzele nwf org Jacques Hebert National Audubon Society 504 264 6849 jhebert audubon org Elizabeth Van Cleve Environmental Defense Fund 202 553 2543 evancleve edf org NOAA Study Confirms BP Oil Spill Led to Dolphin Deaths in Northern Gulf of Mexico Leading Conservation Groups Call on BP to Accept Responsibility for Continued Environmental Damage New Orleans LA May 20 2015 Today the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration NOAA released a peer reviewed study confirming that the 2010 Gulf oil disaster contributed to an increase in dolphin deaths in the northern Gulf of Mexico Examining dolphins including those in Barataria Bay La an area hit particularly hard with heavy oil in 2010 scientists found that contaminants from petroleum in BP oil caused lung and adrenal lesions that led to death in these dolphins In response national and local conservation groups working on Mississippi River Delta and Gulf Coast restoration including Environmental Defense Fund National Audubon Society National Wildlife Federation and the Lake Pontchartrain Basin Foundation issued the following statement BP has spent millions of dollars trying to dodge responsibility and convince the American public that wildlife and habitat in the Gulf were minimally impacted by its hundreds of millions of gallons of oil spilled in 2010 Just two months ago BP marked the fifth anniversary of the Gulf oil disaster by releasing a report claiming the Gulf had largely recovered from the spill Despite BP s best claims this new NOAA study definitively links the increased dolphin deaths in Barataria Bay with the 2010 Gulf oil disaster and is yet another example of the extensive and destructive impact that BP s oil unleashed on the people wildlife and environment of the Gulf Additional scientific research conducted through the Natural Resource Damage Assessment indicates that dolphins a top predator are experiencing impacts from BP s oil and are still dying at higher than normal rates due to oil exposure in the Gulf ecosystem Last fall BP was found to be grossly negligent for its actions in the Gulf oil disaster This study is a stark reminder that the oil is still in the Gulf it s still causing sickness and death in some species and it s still affecting the entire ecosystem It s time for BP to stop denying the true impacts of the spill and accept responsibility for its actions so that meaningful restoration can proceed Background Since the BP oil disaster five years ago ongoing findings deliver truths omitted by BP s ads the oil disaster s negative effects are increasingly clear present and far from resolved A recent infographic depicts ongoing impacts of the Gulf oil disaster five years later And over the past year alone new scientific research has surfaced A 2014 study found evidence of a 1 250 square mile area of oil contamination on the ocean floor around the Macondo wellhead in deep Gulf sediments A previous NOAA study found a large number of dead dolphins in heavily oiled places including Barataria Bay La Recent studies estimate 1 000 000 birds died as a result of being exposed to BP oil Modeling for a recent stock assessment projected that between 20 000 and 60 000 Kemp s ridley sea turtles died in 2010 as a result of the spill A 2014 study found concentrations of PAH polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon which can cause harmful effects in many birds fish and wildlife in Barataria and Terrebonne marshes which may persist for decades A 2012 study found that oiled marshes in Barataria Bay eroded at double the rate of non oiled marshes A recent survey found that 70 percent of Americans believe BP should pay maximum fines under the Clean Water Act for its role in the 2010 Gulf oil spill No Comments Using adaptive management to help

    Original URL path: http://www.mississippiriverdelta.org/blog/category/reports/ (2016-05-01)
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