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  • Meet Stephanie Powell | Restore the Mississippi River Delta
    Years Later Two Years Later Climate Coastal Protection and Restoration Authority CPRA coastal restoration Community Resiliency Congress Senator David Vitter Senator Mary Landrieu Economics Job Creation Wildlife tourism Economy Federal Policy Clean Water Act Natural Resource Damage Assessment NRDA RESTORE Act Water Resources Development Act WRDA Gulf Coast Ecosystem Restoration Council Gulf Coast Ecosystem Restoration Task Force Hunting and Fishing Hurricanes Hurricane Isaac Hurricane Katrina Hurricane Rita K10 Job openings Latest News Louisiana Coastal Area LCA Whites Ditch Mardi Gras Pass Media Resources Meetings Events Mississippi River Gulf Outlet NOAA People Faces of the Delta Profiles in Resilience Staff Profiles Tributes Voices of the Delta Reports Restoration Projects 19 Priority Projects Diversions Mid Barataria Sediment Diversion Restore the Coast Science Science and Engineering Special Team SEST Seafood State Legislature The Netherlands Uncategorized Videos Wax Lake Delta Wildlife Meet Stephanie Powell June 7 2011 Posted by Elizabeth Van Cleve in Staff Profiles Stephanie is the field director for the joint Mississippi River Delta restoration campaign She is responsible for running the field operations of the campaign including writing and implementing a national field plan contributing strategic and political analysis and working with staff to build grassroots support for restoration efforts Before joining the campaign Stephanie was the executive director of the Southern Energy Network a regional organization dedicated to working with youth to combat climate change advance renewable energy and promote a smart just energy economy Previously she worked for the Gulf Restoration Network where she organized community members to help protect wetlands stop water pollution and minimize the Gulf of Mexico dead zone Growing up in north Florida my family spent a lot of time outdoors says Stephanie Whether fishing with my uncles along black bottom creeks boating on the coast or sitting on cypress knees water and wetlands were

    Original URL path: http://www.mississippiriverdelta.org/blog/2011/06/07/meet-stephanie-powell/ (2016-05-01)
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  • Meet David Muth | Restore the Mississippi River Delta
    Flood 2012 Coastal Master Plan Coastal Master Plan series Army Corps of Engineers Birds BP Oil Disaster 5 Years Later Two Years Later Climate Coastal Protection and Restoration Authority CPRA coastal restoration Community Resiliency Congress Senator David Vitter Senator Mary Landrieu Economics Job Creation Wildlife tourism Economy Federal Policy Clean Water Act Natural Resource Damage Assessment NRDA RESTORE Act Water Resources Development Act WRDA Gulf Coast Ecosystem Restoration Council Gulf Coast Ecosystem Restoration Task Force Hunting and Fishing Hurricanes Hurricane Isaac Hurricane Katrina Hurricane Rita K10 Job openings Latest News Louisiana Coastal Area LCA Whites Ditch Mardi Gras Pass Media Resources Meetings Events Mississippi River Gulf Outlet NOAA People Faces of the Delta Profiles in Resilience Staff Profiles Tributes Voices of the Delta Reports Restoration Projects 19 Priority Projects Diversions Mid Barataria Sediment Diversion Restore the Coast Science Science and Engineering Special Team SEST Seafood State Legislature The Netherlands Uncategorized Videos Wax Lake Delta Wildlife Meet David Muth March 2 2011 Posted by Delta Dispatches in Staff Profiles David Muth National Wildlife Federation David Muth joined the National Wildlife Federation at the beginning of 2011 after working for the National Park Service at Jean Lafitte National Historical Park and Preserve since 1980 At Jean Lafitte he managed the park s natural and cultural resources including the Barataria Preserve a wetland in the upper basin on the outskirts of New Orleans that Congress set aside as a representative example of the delta ecosystem A native of New Orleans David has had a lifelong love of the delta including its landscapes history culture and wildlife He is an avid birder and has served as past President of the Louisiana Ornithological Society an officer of Orleans Audubon Society an advisor to Woodlands Trail and Park and a regional editor covering Louisiana for North

    Original URL path: http://www.mississippiriverdelta.org/blog/2011/03/02/meet-david-muth/ (2016-05-01)
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  • Sentiment counter calculations | Restore the Mississippi River Delta
    Latest Delta News Fact Sheets Press Releases Reports and Resources Videos About Who We Are What We Do Meet Our Experts Contact Upcoming Events Support Restoration Sign up Take Action Protect The Funding Volunteer RELATED SOURCES How the uncaptured sediment was calculated The uncaptured sediment was calculated using the sediment ratings curve developed by Allison et al 2012 Allison et a developed the sediment ratings curve for years 2008 to 2010 using the USGS operated monitoring station near Belle Chasse LA and a turbidity sensor measurements that were calibrated using boat based suspended sediment measurements The best fit relationship between water discharge measured at the USGS Belle Chasse station and total suspended sediment load in the river for years 2008 2009 and 2010 was Total Load tons d Y0 a cfs b Y0 1 361E 4 a 2 874E 4 cfs daily discharge at Belle Chasse b 1 553 Sediment Ratings Curve at Belle Chasse La for River Discharge versus boat based total sediment load measurements Credit Allison et al 2012 Sediment ratings curves describe a general relationship between water discharge and sediment that is useful over annual timescales However it should be noted that there is variability in the

    Original URL path: http://www.mississippiriverdelta.org/sentiment-counter-calculations/ (2016-05-01)
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  • New sediment counter shows amount of uncaptured sediment passing through LA every second | Restore the Mississippi River Delta
    Gras Pass Media Resources Meetings Events Mississippi River Gulf Outlet NOAA People Faces of the Delta Profiles in Resilience Staff Profiles Tributes Voices of the Delta Reports Restoration Projects 19 Priority Projects Diversions Mid Barataria Sediment Diversion Restore the Coast Science Science and Engineering Special Team SEST Seafood State Legislature The Netherlands Uncategorized Videos Wax Lake Delta Wildlife New sediment counter shows amount of uncaptured sediment passing through LA every second December 2 2015 Posted by lbourg in coastal restoration Restoration Projects Science By Alisha Renfro Staff Scientist Restore the Mississippi River Delta Coalition National Wildlife Federation There s less sediment moving down the Mississippi River than there used to be Much of that missing material is trapped behind dams built upriver of Louisiana Despite the reduction in sediment it carries the Mississippi is still mighty with approximately 90 million tons of sediment passing the city of Belle Chasse La each year 1 Tragically much of that mud and sand will be carried past the sediment starved wetlands and barrier islands of the delta where it could have great benefits and out into the Gulf leaving us with a missed opportunity to restore health and resiliency to our coast Photo CPRA The new sediment counter published on the homepage of our website shows the tons of sand and mud in the water that moves pass the USGS gage in Belle Chasse La every second For this counter the sediment is estimated using the relationship between sediment and the flow of the Mississippi River at Belle Chasse for years 2008 to 2010 as described by Mead Allison Ph D and others in the appendix of their 2012 paper A water and sediment budget for the lower Mississippi Atchafalaya River in flood years 2008 2010 Implications for sediment discharge to the oceans

    Original URL path: http://www.mississippiriverdelta.org/blog/2015/12/02/new-sediment-counter-shows-amount-of-uncaptured-sediment-passing-through-la-every-second/ (2016-05-01)
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  • Remembering Rita: Ten Years Later | Restore the Mississippi River Delta
    NOAA People Faces of the Delta Profiles in Resilience Staff Profiles Tributes Voices of the Delta Reports Restoration Projects 19 Priority Projects Diversions Mid Barataria Sediment Diversion Restore the Coast Science Science and Engineering Special Team SEST Seafood State Legislature The Netherlands Uncategorized Videos Wax Lake Delta Wildlife Remembering Rita Ten Years Later September 22 2015 Posted by lbourg in coastal restoration Community Resiliency Hurricane Rita Hurricanes People Profiles in Resilience September 24 marks 10 years since Hurricane Rita the strongest hurricane ever recorded in the Gulf of Mexico slammed ashore sending a storm surge up to 18 feet in some locations killing 120 people damaging areas stretching from Plaquemines to Cameron Parish and into Texas and causing over 10 billion in damages Rita demonstrated that the best offense against future storms is strong Multiple Lines of Defense that begins with restoring and preserving the wetlands that buffer wind and waves working in conjunction will structural risk reduction measures and non structural measures such as levees and home elevation This week Restore the Mississippi River Delta Coalition welcomes guest authors to our Delta Dispatches blog to share their perspectives of Rita and where things stand ten years later In The Eye of the Storm A Personal Account of Rita by Windell Curole September 20 2005 In the wake of Hurricane Katrina a congressional hearing was held concerning improving the way we warn and prepare for hurricanes One of the panel members with me is Dr Max Mayfield Director of the National Hurricane Center We testify to the Senate Commerce Science and Transportation Committee s Disaster Prevention and Prediction Subcommittee We both discuss and are concerned about Hurricane Rita and the probability of it following in Hurricane Katrina s footstep After the hearing we wish each other good luck as he hurries out of Washington to get to the National Hurricane Center in Coral Gables and I hurry back to South Lafourche In the next two days Rita becomes what everyone fears another monster hurricane heading for the northern Gulf of Mexico coast Like Katrina it becomes a Category 5 hurricane and like Katrina it drops in wind intensity to a Category 3 by landfall on the 23 rd of September In South Lafourche the tide is already rising on the morning of September 22 nd when we have to close the Leon Theriot floodgate two miles south of Golden Meadow The storm is many miles to the south in the middle of the gulf but pushes a large tide because of its size and power We close the Ted Gisclair floodgate in Larose We are managing both floodgates trying to allow boats to enter the system while keeping as much water out of Bayou Lafourche as possible Hurricane Rita makes landfall on Friday morning on the LA Texas border and pushes a 17 ft storm surge near the eye of the storm The storm was so big that water kept rising for a day and a half after landfall in

    Original URL path: http://www.mississippiriverdelta.org/blog/2015/09/22/remembering-rita-ten-years-later/ (2016-05-01)
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  • Profiles in Resilience: ORA Estuaries wins 2014 Water Challenge business pitch at New Orleans Entrepreneur Week | Restore the Mississippi River Delta
    Ditch Mardi Gras Pass Media Resources Meetings Events Mississippi River Gulf Outlet NOAA People Faces of the Delta Profiles in Resilience Staff Profiles Tributes Voices of the Delta Reports Restoration Projects 19 Priority Projects Diversions Mid Barataria Sediment Diversion Restore the Coast Science Science and Engineering Special Team SEST Seafood State Legislature The Netherlands Uncategorized Videos Wax Lake Delta Wildlife Profiles in Resilience ORA Estuaries wins 2014 Water Challenge business pitch at New Orleans Entrepreneur Week April 14 2014 Posted by Elizabeth Van Cleve in Economics People Profiles in Resilience Restoration Projects By Keenan Orfalea Communications Intern Environmental Defense Fund Last month ORA Estuaries took first place in the 2014 Water Challenge business pitch competition at New Orleans Entrepreneur Week The Baton Rouge based company beat out four other startups to claim the prize which included 50 000 in seed money as well as free office space and legal counsel for a year This support will help the company to expand the use of its innovative products and services in restoring Louisiana s wetlands Tyler Ortego president and founder of ORA Estuaries ORA Estuaries provides engineering scientific and regulatory consulting services as well as project implementation for clients including local state and federal governments The company s primary products are the patented OysterBreak and OysterKrete technologies The OysterBreak and OysterKrete technologies were originally developed in Louisiana to address Louisiana s coastal land loss said Tyler Ortego president and founder of the company This prize package combined with recent project successes is critical to allowing ORA Estuaries to export that success to other areas of the country and world ORA s innovative technologies are specifically designed to facilitate the protection restoration and healthy growth of coastal estuaries OysterBreak is designed to use the gregarious shell building nature to form a living

    Original URL path: http://www.mississippiriverdelta.org/blog/2014/04/14/profiles-in-resilience-ora-estuaries-wins-2014-water-challenge-at-new-orleans-entrepreneur-week/ (2016-05-01)
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  • Profiles in Coastal Restoration: Allied Concrete Company | Restore the Mississippi River Delta
    Special Team SEST Seafood State Legislature The Netherlands Uncategorized Videos Wax Lake Delta Wildlife Profiles in Coastal Restoration Allied Concrete Company August 5 2013 Posted by Rachel Schott in Economics Profiles in Resilience Restoration Projects Seafood By Will Lindsey Environmental Defense Fund Allied Concrete Company a 68 year old firm based in Charlottesville Va is creating new business opportunities by partnering with conservation groups to deploy miles of new oyster reefs along the Gulf Coast These reefs are composed of an innovative concrete product and create both a restored ecosystem habitat as well as a new business opportunity for Allied Concrete Allied Concrete builds Oyster Castles to battle declining oyster populations in coastal regions Photo Credit Allied Concrete Co In 2011 the 100 1000 Coalition began implementing a project to build 100 miles of oyster reefs in Alabama which would then support more than 1 000 acres of marshland Coalition member organizations include Mobile Baykeeper The Nature Conservancy The Alabama Coastal Foundation Weeks Bay Foundation Dauphin Island Sea Lab The Ocean Foundation Alabama Wildlife Foundation and Coastal Conservation Association A displaced Louisianan Allied Concrete company president Gus Lorber has a passion for saving the Gulf I grew up in Louisiana and worked played and fished in the Louisiana and Mississippi Gulf Coast area my entire life said Lorber I have seen firsthand the degradation of the coastal wetlands in that area my entire life Founded in 1945 Allied traditionally made concrete blocks but the company has since diversified its product range in response to ever changing markets and customer needs Notably in 2007 Allied joined forces with The Nature Conservancy and others to develop a solution to the declining oyster populations in coastal regions The result of this partnership was the Oyster Castle which is a concrete unit by Allied

    Original URL path: http://www.mississippiriverdelta.org/blog/2013/08/05/profiles-in-coastal-restoration-allied-concrete-company/ (2016-05-01)
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  • How much is a Louisiana oyster worth? | Restore the Mississippi River Delta
    America and the northern Gulf of Mexico 2 In Louisiana restoration of oyster reefs has been proposed to both mitigate the decline in stocks and to secure a number of co benefits which oysters provide Such restoration has an associated cost which has some asking How much is an oyster worth Oyster reef restoration in Alabama Source NOAA Fisheries Restoration of oyster reefs in the gulf would impart several benefits to the region including increases in oyster and fish stocks improved water quality erosion control storm attenuation and economic stimulus for local businesses Each of these benefits has an associated economic value and should be factored into the decision to bring oyster reef restoration to scale The most readily apparent economic benefit of oyster reef restoration is an increase in or maintenance of primary oyster productivity Louisiana is the leading oyster producing state in the U S supporting an oyster industry that generates 35 million in dockside value annually 3 Additionally oyster reefs serve as refuge and feeding ground for many estuarine species including fish mobile crustaceans and invertebrates This ecosystem benefit is especially pertinent along the Louisiana coast where oyster reefs are the primary three dimensional habitats available In Louisiana 23 percent of annual marine fishing occurs over oyster beds and these areas provide approximately 2 million 2003 dollars in fisheries value annually for coastal Louisiana 4 Oysters are filter feeders and this filtration notably reduces the turbidity and nitrogen loading of their surrounding water Reduction of turbidity the removal of suspended solids has been shown to have a significant recreational value for boating and beach swimming The willingness to pay for reduction in bacteria and oil as well as improvement in water color for beach goers was estimated to be 23 39 per person per year 5 In a study of the Choptank River in Maryland the economic value of the nitrogen removed by an oyster over a ten year interval was found to be greater than the dockside value of the oyster 6 In a separate analysis an acre of healthy oyster reef was estimated to yield 3 000 in de nitrification value annually 7 Oyster ecosystem impacts Source NOAA Additionally the three dimensional oyster reef structure attenuates wave energy which can reduce erosion rates Oyster reefs are generally understood to dampen wave energy by creating frictional energy between their rough outer surfaces and the wave The associated economic value of wave attenuation is hard to determine as it varies based on location One factor to consider however is that the Gulf of Mexico has over 8 000 miles of shoreline that are at risk for erosion 8 Erosion rates and risk of flooding due to storm surge will continue to increase over time with global climate change environmental degradation and subsidence of the area If we choose to armor these shorelines the current option is to install a bulkhead Bulkheads can cost up to 1 million per mile while oyster cultch placement a common method for

    Original URL path: http://www.mississippiriverdelta.org/blog/2012/08/01/how-much-is-a-louisiana-oyster-worth/ (2016-05-01)
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