archive-org.com » ORG » M » MISSISSIPPIRIVERDELTA.ORG

Total: 311

Choose link from "Titles, links and description words view":

Or switch to "Titles and links view".
  • Restore the Mississippi River Delta | Restore the Mississippi River Delta
    Science 10 Questions About the Mississippi River Delta Public Policy 2012 Coastal Master Plan The Natural Resource Damage Assessment Process Clean Water Act Penalties The RESTORE Act Building a Restoration Economy Tourism and Fishing Jobs Infrastructure Related Jobs Restoration Jobs Export Driven Jobs RELATED SOURCES Related Restore the Delta Answering 10 Fundamental Questions About the Mississippi River Delta Map 100 Years of Mismanagement Recommended Projects and Priorities Fact Sheet Pulsed sediment diversions Louisiana Office of Coastal Restoration and Protection Solutions for the Delta For thousands of years sediment carried by the Mississippi River sustained the delta and wetlands of coastal Louisiana Today levees and other man made structures have brought these processes to a virtual halt The river s powerful land building force must be allowed to rebuild and restore the Mississippi River Delta This reconnecting of the river to its delta requires a scientifically grounded package of federal and state policies and restoration projects Why is the Mississippi River Delta important Reconnecting the River to its Delta Reintroducing freshwater and sediment to the coastal system and restoring natural water flows is critical to restoring the Mississippi River Delta Whether through diversions like mid Barataria and White Ditch non structural flood protection barrier island restoration oyster reef restoration or beneficial use of sediment dredged from the mouth of the Mississippi River restoring the delta will take more than just moving dirt and planting marsh grasses What does large scale restoration look like Sound Science Understanding how best to restore the world s seventh largest delta is a work in progress Monitoring the flow and hydrodynamics of the Atchafalaya River and Basin and calibrating land growth at the Wax Lake Delta show the possibilities of delta formation in this system Tracking the hydrodynamics and sedimentation from existing diversions such as Caernarvon

    Original URL path: http://www.mississippiriverdelta.org/our-work/overview/ (2016-05-01)
    Open archived version from archive


  • 10 Questions about Mississippi River Delta Restoration | Restore the Mississippi River Delta
    summaries are below and the full report is linked here Question 1 Is there enough sediment to restore the delta The Mississippi River Delta is a dynamic place where water and wetlands are constantly shifting with natural patterns of erosion and growth Because of this there has never been enough sediment to sustain the entire delta at one time There have always been areas that are actively growing while other areas disappear Recent decades have also seen the sediment supply of the Mississippi River cut in half by dams upriver Still the amount of available sediment is large enough to build and sustain wetlands in targeted areas of the coast Read more Question 2 Are diversions useful tools for building land Large scale problems require large scale solutions By using the river s sediment to mimic natural deltaic patterns properly designed diversions have the potential to build and sustain substantial amounts of land Read more Question 3 Will diversions introduce nutrients that harm wetland vegetation Although nutrients introduced by diversions will have some impacts on vegetation particularly on the distribution of certain plant species the cost of inaction is higher Without large scale restoration that provides a source of sediment and fresh water the delta s wetlands will continue to degrade into open water Thus any negative effects of higher nutrient input are outweighed by the larger benefits for the entire coast Read more Question 4 Will diversions harm fisheries Species will react in different ways to changes in the coastal landscape but research indicates that large scale sediment diversions can support the overall health of fisheries by returning the system to a more sustainable baseline Without action the status quo will prove ruinous for fisheries and the communities dependent on them Read more The history or perhaps future of fisheries productivity in Louisiana and presumed causes for change Panel A assumes fisheries remain intact but that we may be heading towards a steep decline Panel B assumes that Louisiana fisheries have already declined because of overfishing Cowan et al Life history history hysteresis habitat changes in Louisiana s Coastal ecosystem Bulletin of Marine Sciences volume 83 1 p 197 215 July 2008 Question 5 How will restoration affect navigation Ongoing land loss in the Mississippi River Delta threatens the long term viability of Louisiana s navigation system Since the 1920s the river has been straitjacketed by a levee system known as the Mississippi River and Tributaries Project which is responsible for a large amount of land loss in the region Revising the current management scheme and conducting large scale restoration is the best way to protect this vital navigation system over the long term Read more Question 6 Can levees alone provide enough flood protection As recent disasters have shown levees alone cannot be relied on to provide all the protection needed for coastal communities and infrastructure In some cases by damaging wetlands and encouraging unwise development levees actually increase exposure to flood and storm risks Though a valuable

    Original URL path: http://www.mississippiriverdelta.org/our-work/overview/science/answering-10-fundamental-questions-about-the-mississippi-river-delta/ (2016-05-01)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Science of the Mississippi River Delta | Restore the Mississippi River Delta
    Us in the News Latest Delta News Fact Sheets Press Releases Reports and Resources Videos About Who We Are What We Do Meet Our Experts Contact Upcoming Events Support Restoration Sign up Take Action Protect The Funding Volunteer Our Work Restore the Delta Science 10 Questions About the Mississippi River Delta Public Policy 2012 Coastal Master Plan The Natural Resource Damage Assessment Process Clean Water Act Penalties The RESTORE Act Building a Restoration Economy Tourism and Fishing Jobs Infrastructure Related Jobs Restoration Jobs Export Driven Jobs RELATED SOURCES Related Restore the Delta Answering 10 Fundamental Questions About the Mississippi River Delta Map 100 Years of Mismanagement Recommended Projects and Priorities Fact Sheet Pulsed sediment diversions Louisiana Office of Coastal Restoration and Protection Science To restore the Mississippi River Delta scientists and engineers must design and support effective means of deltaic land building The Mississippi has not been connected with its delta for generations and so key questions of physical processes biology and scale must be addressed with solutions that Are sustainable in the face of continued subsidence rising sea levels and more intense or frequent storms Incorporate answers to multiple environmental and socioeconomic problems Are readily seen as realistic and subject to implementation through creative public private partnerships Success depends on a strategy that points the way towards system level restoration projects and leads by example through a high standard of scientific and engineering excellence in the planning construction and operation of large scale restoration projects Without this focus smaller scale less controversial projects will prevail These projects may provide some benefits but are not enough to address the core dynamic of widespread deltaic collapse Activities scientists use to pursue large scale restoration include Using applied science and demonstration example projects to answer questions that pose barriers to restoration at

    Original URL path: http://www.mississippiriverdelta.org/our-work/overview/science/ (2016-05-01)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Public Policy - What It Looks Like For The Delta | Restore the Mississippi River Delta
    a threshold of collapse Restoration Plan To address the enormity of the challenge of restoring the Mississippi River Delta the state of Louisiana and the federal government need to work jointly to develop and then implement a comprehensive restoration plan addressing the systemic causes of delta collapse and outlining specific actions for restoration Some of the current comprehensive planning efforts include the following State Master Plan Every five years the state of Louisiana writes a plan recommending specific action to protect and restore the coast The 2012 Coastal Master Plan is most comprehensive action plan to date for restoring the Mississippi River Delta and all of coastal Louisiana Federal Planning Louisiana s Master Plan will need to be integrated with federal plans to restore both the delta and the full Gulf Coast The interagency Gulf Coast Ecosystem Restoration Task Force is developing a road map for Gulf of Mexico restoration that will include actions that federal agencies can immediately implement to promote restoration and outline what s needed for long term restoration The 2007 Water Resources Development Act WRDA also authorized a comprehensive federal restoration plan in Section 7002 Governance for Delta While the land subsiding in Louisiana is a mixture of public and private property the management of the Mississippi River is largely under federal control To actually implement a comprehensive restoration plan a governance structure for the Mississippi River Delta will need to be established that includes both state and federal agencies with the authority to manage the river and delta to meet restoration goals Federal Governance Many federal agencies have a role in managing the delta including the Departments of Interior and Agriculture but the management of the Mississippi River and therefore the delta is mostly left to the U S Army Corps of Engineers the Corps which manages the river for both flood control and to support navigation The development and operation of diversions spillways dredging and any potential changes to the flows of the Mississippi and Atchafalaya are under the jurisdiction of the Corps Louisiana State Governance Louisiana s Coastal Protection and Restoration Authority is responsible for the State Master Plan and the annual coastal restoration plan CPRA is also responsible for all for overseeing all projects and coastal protection under state jurisdiction including oil spill response and land loss Funding Large scale restoration and re engineering of the Mississippi River Delta will not be cheap Individual projects can run into the hundreds of millions and even billions of dollars However the cost of inaction when community impacts the value of lost ecosystem services and the loss of storm protection are combined will be far higher Initial funding for restoration will need to come from a variety of sources Some available or potential sources of funding include Natural Resource Damage Assessment NRDA Following the Deepwater Horizon oil disaster BP was ordered to pay for restoration to parts of the ecosystem directly impacted by the spill according to a Natural Resource Damage Assessment BP has already

    Original URL path: http://www.mississippiriverdelta.org/our-work/overview/public-policy/ (2016-05-01)
    Open archived version from archive

  • 2012 Louisiana Coastal Master Plan | Restore the Mississippi River Delta
    Master Plan The Natural Resource Damage Assessment Process Clean Water Act Penalties The RESTORE Act Building a Restoration Economy Tourism and Fishing Jobs Infrastructure Related Jobs Restoration Jobs Export Driven Jobs RELATED SOURCES Related Public Policy Common Ground 2012 Coastal Master Plan Offers Long Term Vision Flexibility for Louisiana The 2012 Coastal Master Plan A vision to restore and protect Louisiana s coastal resources and communities Louisiana s 2012 Coastal Master Plan is a landmark 50 year 50 billion blueprint for a revived coast and secure future This plan drafted by the Coastal Protection and Restoration Authority CPRA was released in draft form in January 2012 and passed unanimously by the Louisiana legislature in April 2012 The 2012 Coastal Master Plan builds off previous plans but is the most comprehensive attempt yet at putting forth solutions to coastal Louisiana s myriad environmental and engineering challenges Check out our coalition comments on the 2012 Coastal Master Plan The science based process used to develop the 2012 plan was designed to evaluate the range of possibilities for restoring and protecting Louisiana s coast and wetlands Relying on coastal experts and the best available science to select prioritize and implement projects the plan puts forth an efficient realistic course forward in coastal restoration Examples of protection and restoration projects Courtesy of Dan Swenson The Times Picayune The key to this process lies in recognizing that Louisiana s coast is changing and will continue to change while also realizing that accepting the status quo will invariably lead to continued ecological collapse and erosion of Louisiana s barrier islands and wetlands The question facing Louisiana and the nation is whether to accept a future of continued loss and retreat or whether to build a Louisiana coast that though different from that of the past is

    Original URL path: http://www.mississippiriverdelta.org/our-work/overview/public-policy/2012-coastal-master-plan/ (2016-05-01)
    Open archived version from archive

  • The RESTORE Act | Restore the Mississippi River Delta
    for the Gulf Coast Now that the RESTORE Act is signed into law communities and ecosystems along the Gulf Coast are guaranteed funding to assist with recovery from one of the worst environmental disasters of our time How did the RESTORE Act come about The RESTORE Act was introduced in July 2011 by a bipartisan coalition of nine Gulf Coast senators The legislation was prompted in part by two official reports on the spill one by Navy Secretary and former Governor of Mississippi Ray Mabus and another from the bipartisan National Commission on the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill and Offshore Drilling Both reports recommended that Clean Water Act penalties from the spill be dedicated to Gulf Coast restoration Given the devastation the spill caused in the Gulf this was the only fair thing to do On July 6 2012 after more than two years of work by legislators and advocates the RESTORE Act was signed into law by the President The law creates an essential framework for managing and financing the Gulf Coast s recovery and establishes a trust account that will receive 80 percent of Clean Water Act penalties from the spill for Gulf Coast restoration Breakdown of RESTORE Act funding As BP and other responsible parties pay fines under the Clean Water Act the money will first be transferred to a trust fund The money in this Gulf Coast Restoration Trust Fund will be allocated to the Gulf Coast states and Gulf Coast Ecosystem Restoration Council according to the following guidelines 30 percent for environmental restoration projects in the comprehensive plan as determined by the Gulf Coast Ecosystem Restoration Council 30 percent divided among the five Gulf states based on the Oil Spill Impact Allocation Formula 35 percent divided equally between the five Gulf states 7 percent to each to be used for eligible restoration activities 2 5 percent dedicated to a Gulf Coast fisheries monitoring program 2 5 percent to establish Gulf Coast Centers of Excellence research centers Breakdown of RESTORE Act funding Click to enlarge How does the RESTORE Act work Establishes the Gulf Coast Ecosystem Restoration Council The RESTORE Act established the Gulf Coast Ecosystem Restoration Council RESTORE Council which is comprised of governors from the five affected Gulf states the Secretaries from the U S Departments of the Interior Commerce Agriculture and Homeland Security as well as the Secretary of the Army and the Administrator of the U S Environmental Protection Agency The Gulf states recommended and President Obama appointed the Secretary of Commerce as the Council s Chair Mandates a Gulf Coast Comprehensive Restoration Plan One of the RESTORE Council s primary responsibilities is to develop a Comprehensive Plan to restore the ecosystem and the economy of the Gulf Coast region The Council approved the Initial Comprehensive Plan in August 2013 The RESTORE Act mandates that the restoration plan Restore and protect natural resources ecosystems fisheries marine and wildlife habitats beaches and wetlands of the Gulf Coast Prioritize large scale projects that make

    Original URL path: http://www.mississippiriverdelta.org/our-work/overview/public-policy/clean-water-act-penalties/restore-act/ (2016-05-01)
    Open archived version from archive

  • The Natural Resource Damage Assessment Process | Restore the Mississippi River Delta
    to wildlife coastal wetlands and the deepwater ocean environment In April 2011 a year after the disaster BP set aside 1 billion to help fund the NRDA process The 1 billion agreement guarantees 100 million for restoration in Louisiana with the state eligible to apply for an additional 500 million in federal funds Money received by the state will fund projects that restore resources to their pre oil spill condition Each project is selected jointly by a group of trustees representing the five Gulf Coast states impacted by the spill the three federal agencies overseeing the restoration process and BP On Dec 14 2011 the trustees released a Draft Environmental Restoration Plan and Environmental Assessment DERP EA to begin the first phase of restoration projects The DERP EA contains two projects for Louisiana that will be funded by the state s 100 million allotment These Louisiana projects call for 850 acres of cultch placement on public oyster seed grounds and 140 acres of marsh recreation in the Lake Hermitage area of St Bernard Parish More information about the projects can be found on NOAA s Early Restoration page The public may review and comment on these and other projects selected by the trustees through the government s official Gulf Restoration website Our coalition has developed principles and criteria to govern project selection throughout the NRDA process and recommends that the trustees consider the following Core Principles and Project Selection Criteria to guide their decisions on both early and long term restoration Core Principles Restoration will contribute to a healthy productive and biologically diverse coastal and marine ecosystem that is the backbone of the economic and cultural well being of the gulf region Restoration uses an ecosystem approach based on an understanding of factors that control the populations of species or condition of habitats found in coastal and marine areas Restoration priorities and activities will be re evaluated as information on the extent and significance of injury to natural resources is obtained from the Natural Resource Damage Assessment and from other scientific sources Restoration activities will be subject to independent scientific review within the time frame required by other evaluations and decision making processes Restoration must include meaningful public participation and NEPA compliance at all levels throughout the process Restoration should facilitate accountability and reflect public ownership of the process by timely release and reasonable access to information and data Long term scientific monitoring programs and decision support tools shall be established to assess performance of restoration activities allow for adaptive management and measure the health of the Gulf ecosystem on a continuing basis Project Selection Criteria Priority will be given to restoration projects that facilitate recovery of injured natural resources and lost services by addressing systemic problems facing the ecosystem including historical degradation Priority will be given to restoration of natural resources and ecosystem services that have economic cultural and subsistence value to people living and working along the Gulf Coast Extra consideration should be given to projects that increase

    Original URL path: http://www.mississippiriverdelta.org/our-work/overview/public-policy/natural-resource-damage-assessment/ (2016-05-01)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Building a Restoration Economy for Louisiana | Restore the Mississippi River Delta
    the News Latest Delta News Fact Sheets Press Releases Reports and Resources Videos About Who We Are What We Do Meet Our Experts Contact Upcoming Events Support Restoration Sign up Take Action Protect The Funding Volunteer Our Work Restore the Delta Science 10 Questions About the Mississippi River Delta Public Policy 2012 Coastal Master Plan The Natural Resource Damage Assessment Process Clean Water Act Penalties The RESTORE Act Building a Restoration Economy Tourism and Fishing Jobs Infrastructure Related Jobs Restoration Jobs Export Driven Jobs RELATED SOURCES Related Restoration Economy Restoring the Gulf Coast fact sheet PDF Datu Research Wildlife Tourism and the Gulf Coast Economy PDF Duke University report Restoring the Gulf Coast New Markets for Established Firms PDF Duke University report Restoring Gulf Oyster Reefs Opportunities for Innovation PDF Duke University report Geosynthetics Coastal Management Applications in the Gulf of Mexico PDF Mather Economics report Job Creation from Gulf Coast Wetlands Restoration PDF Building a Restoration Economy Environmental Restoration Economic Restoration Tourism and fishing jobs Restoration jobs Infrastructure related jobs Export driven jobs Investing in coastal restoration in the Mississippi River Delta and Gulf Coast provides quadruple returns by supporting jobs in multiple sectors Tourism and fishing jobs Infrastructure

    Original URL path: http://www.mississippiriverdelta.org/our-work/overview/economics/ (2016-05-01)
    Open archived version from archive



  •