archive-org.com » ORG » M » MISSISSIPPIRIVERDELTA.ORG

Total: 311

Choose link from "Titles, links and description words view":

Or switch to "Titles and links view".
  • Waterfowl finding new homes in thriving Mississippi River wetlands restoration project | Restore the Mississippi River Delta
    the Caernarvon freshwater diversion known as Big Mar Big Sea Situated in the last big bend of the Mississippi River about a half an hour drive south of New Orleans this failed agricultural enterprise of the past shows up on satellite photos as a big square lake Recent imagery had suggested that perhaps some mud shoals had developed as a result of the diversion But today I wasn t looking at mud shoals I was looking at acres of bushy green growing happy vegetation This couldn t be Big Mar This was Big Mar sh Caernarvon is the diversion everybody loves to hate It doesn t work they say It hasn t built land What good is it I always sigh when I hear that Diversions should be a way of reconnecting the water and sediment of the Mississippi River constrained within levees with the nearby marshes which pre levee were built and sustained by annual flooding of the river Caernarvon is not that kind of sediment diversion it is a freshwater diversion only designed to lower salinities in an area where saltwater had intruded Although the water of the Mississippi River contains lots of mud and sand this diversion project didn t focus on land building and was built instead to provide fresh water to a basin being inundated with salt But sitting in the boat in an area that could no longer be referred to as a sea but rather a sea of plants we were stunned at what the river had wrought This is more than I ever expected said John Lopez a seasoned wetland scientist and executive director of the Lake Pontchartrain Basin Foundation This is phenomenal David Muth the National Wildlife Federation s Louisiana state director reached into the shallow water and grabbed a handful from the bottom It is mixed sand and silt Once these plants become established this marsh will not be washing away in the next hurricane the way nearby organic soils did in Katrina This is solid ground So even though the design and intention of this particular diversion hadn t encouraged it to the Mississippi River had done what it does build land Caernarvon was opened in 1990 and over the years it s transported and deposited sand and mud into Big Mar a little at a time year after year Small areas of land began emerging after Hurricane Katrina Big flood years on the river in spring 2008 and 2010 provided extra amounts of sediment and the extended opening of the diversion during the oil spill a year ago might have contributed additional sediment as well so that when the water receded more land emerged And in south Louisiana it doesn t take long for plants to take root grow and enhance land building by trapping and holding even more sediment The spring and summer of 2011 did the trick and what looked promising a year ago looked spectacular today Our boat captains and Chris Macaluso of the Louisiana

    Original URL path: http://www.mississippiriverdelta.org/blog/2011/09/02/waterfowl-finding-new-homes-in-thriving-mississippi-river-wetlands-restoration-project/ (2016-05-01)
    Open archived version from archive


  • As Flood Waters Recede, New Land Appears in West Bay | Restore the Mississippi River Delta
    K10 Job openings Latest News Louisiana Coastal Area LCA Whites Ditch Mardi Gras Pass Media Resources Meetings Events Mississippi River Gulf Outlet NOAA People Faces of the Delta Profiles in Resilience Staff Profiles Tributes Voices of the Delta Reports Restoration Projects 19 Priority Projects Diversions Mid Barataria Sediment Diversion Restore the Coast Science Science and Engineering Special Team SEST Seafood State Legislature The Netherlands Uncategorized Videos Wax Lake Delta Wildlife As Flood Waters Recede New Land Appears in West Bay July 7 2011 Posted by Elizabeth Van Cleve in 2011 Mississippi River Flood Diversions Restoration Projects By David Muth National Wildlife Federation Alisha Renfro Coastal Scientist National Wildlife Federation and Jim Tripp Senior Counsel Environmental Defense Fund standing on newly built land in West Bay On June 22 members of the Mississippi River Delta Restoration Campaign visited the West Bay Sediment Diversion site to make a preliminary assessment of effects of the great Mississippi River flood of 2011 What they found exceeded expectations Standing where flood water had risen to waist deep level or even deeper they now stood in ankle deep water on a hard sand bottom Based on this observation there is every expectation that when the Mississippi flood waters completely recede new land will emerge in the delta and marsh plants will begin to colonize it The West Bay Sediment Diversion Project which began as one of the great early hopes of the Coastal Wetland Planning Protection and Restoration Authority CWPPRA program recently has become a problem child derided as a failure and blamed on dubious evidence for causing shoaling in an anchorage downriver The concept was simple to build a bigger version of the many uncontrolled artificial crevasses that have been used quite successfully 50 000 cubic feet per second equal to the volume of several

    Original URL path: http://www.mississippiriverdelta.org/blog/2011/07/07/as-flood-waters-recede-new-land-appears-in-west-bay/ (2016-05-01)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Hurricane Season Starts Today: A Renewed Call for Restoration | Restore the Mississippi River Delta
    Ecosystem Restoration Task Force Hunting and Fishing Hurricanes Hurricane Isaac Hurricane Katrina Hurricane Rita K10 Job openings Latest News Louisiana Coastal Area LCA Whites Ditch Mardi Gras Pass Media Resources Meetings Events Mississippi River Gulf Outlet NOAA People Faces of the Delta Profiles in Resilience Staff Profiles Tributes Voices of the Delta Reports Restoration Projects 19 Priority Projects Diversions Mid Barataria Sediment Diversion Restore the Coast Science Science and Engineering Special Team SEST Seafood State Legislature The Netherlands Uncategorized Videos Wax Lake Delta Wildlife Hurricane Season Starts Today A Renewed Call for Restoration June 1 2011 Posted by Elizabeth Van Cleve in 2011 Mississippi River Flood BP Oil Disaster Congress Hurricanes Hurricane Katrina in the Gulf of Mexico August 29 2005 Credit GOES 12 Satellite NASA NOAA By Elizabeth Skree Environmental Defense Fund The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Association NOAA is predicting an above average hurricane season which starts today so communities along Louisiana s coast are bracing for yet another possible disaster The historic Mississippi River floodwaters have barely begun to recede Additionally the Gulf is still recovering from last summer s devastating BP oil disaster These tragic events in addition to the ongoing rapid land loss along Louisiana s coast during the last eight decades continue making the state s coastal communities and cities vulnerable to disaster Every hour more than a football field s worth of Louisiana s wetlands disappear These wetlands act as a natural storm surge barrier protecting Louisiana s coast As land loss caused by sinking land increases these vital wetlands disappear leaving people and infrastructure exposed and vulnerable Numerous industries communities and wildlife depend on the Mississippi River Delta for survival and it is imperative that the region be revitalized and restored for the future of the region and the nation One way

    Original URL path: http://www.mississippiriverdelta.org/blog/2011/06/01/hurricane-season-starts-today-a-renewed-call-for-restoration/ (2016-05-01)
    Open archived version from archive

  • This Tool Lets You See Flood Risk to Your Own Home | Restore the Mississippi River Delta
    Lake Delta Wildlife This Tool Lets You See Flood Risk to Your Own Home March 2 2016 Posted by Emily McCalla in 2012 Coastal Master Plan Coastal Protection and Restoration Authority CPRA Community Resiliency By Simone Maloz Executive Director Restore or Retreat smaloz Want to know more about flood risk in your own backyard zeroing in on your very address Want to know more about Louisiana Coastal Master Plan projects that will help reduce that risk Then check out the best kept secret in coastal Louisiana the Flood Risk and Resilience Viewer launched by the Coastal Protection and Restoration Authority Watch this quick video tutorial and introduction The easy to use viewer displays information on coastal land change flood risk and impacts to communities This innovative online tool provides residents with access to the state s best information about how Louisiana s coast may change in the future as well as resources to make communities and properties safer The viewer uses data produced for the 2012 Coastal Master Plan and shows current land loss and flood risk as well as projections 50 years into the future Also displayed are the 2012 Coastal Master Plan protection and restoration projects that offer land building and risk reduction benefits across Louisiana s coast Flood risk in 50 years without the Coastal Master Plan On the homepage of the website you can enter a specific address or view the entire Louisiana coast Through an easy to navigate toolbar you can click on land change flood risk socio economic factors impacts from flooding and other resources You can delve into different sea level rise scenarios flood events 50 100 or 500 year and impacts with or without the implementation of master plan projects There is information explaining what a 100 or 500 year flood event

    Original URL path: http://www.mississippiriverdelta.org/blog/2016/03/02/flood-risk-and-resilience-viewer/ (2016-05-01)
    Open archived version from archive

  • New study: Cost of not pursuing significant coastal restoration could reach $133 billion | Restore the Mississippi River Delta
    Profiles Tributes Voices of the Delta Reports Restoration Projects 19 Priority Projects Diversions Mid Barataria Sediment Diversion Restore the Coast Science Science and Engineering Special Team SEST Seafood State Legislature The Netherlands Uncategorized Videos Wax Lake Delta Wildlife New study Cost of not pursuing significant coastal restoration could reach 133 billion December 21 2015 Posted by jhebert in 2012 Coastal Master Plan Army Corps of Engineers Coastal Protection and Restoration Authority CPRA coastal restoration Community Resiliency Economics Federal Policy Hurricanes Reports Restore the Coast Science By Elizabeth Van Cleve Communications Manager Environmental Defense Fund Louisiana has lost nearly 1 900 squares miles of land since the 1930s Without future action to restore the coast and reverse this trend the state stands to lose another 1 750 square miles of land by 2060 This land loss crisis not only impacts the communities wildlife and ecology of south Louisiana but it also puts cities homes infrastructure and industries at risk Coastal wetlands serve as a buffer against the effects of waves storms and sea level rise The continued loss of wetlands jeopardizes Louisiana s diverse economy as well as the entire nation that depends on the Mississippi River Delta for shipping oil and gas fisheries tourism and other industries A recent study conducted by the Louisiana State University LSU and the RAND Corporation aims to measure the future economic impacts of continued coastal land loss Commissioned by the Louisiana Coastal Protection and Restoration Authority CPRA Economic Evaluation of Coastal Land Loss in Louisiana provides a quantitative understanding of the economic damages caused by wetlands loss if we don t take action now to restore the coast The two year study measures the projected economic costs associated with continued land loss under future with no action scenario including projected damages to capital stock

    Original URL path: http://www.mississippiriverdelta.org/blog/2015/12/21/new-study-cost-of-not-pursuing-significant-coastal-restoration-could-reach-133-billion/ (2016-05-01)
    Open archived version from archive

  • $52.2m for restoration | Restore the Mississippi River Delta
    of the Delta Reports Restoration Projects 19 Priority Projects Diversions Mid Barataria Sediment Diversion Restore the Coast Science Science and Engineering Special Team SEST Seafood State Legislature The Netherlands Uncategorized Videos Wax Lake Delta Wildlife 52 2 million in oil spill funds approved for Louisiana coastal restoration December 15 2015 Posted by Delta Dispatches in 2012 Coastal Master Plan BP Oil Disaster coastal restoration Gulf Coast Ecosystem Restoration Council Natural Resource Damage Assessment NRDA Restoration Projects RESTORE Act By Elizabeth Weiner Senior Policy Manager Environmental Defense Fund Penny Pritzker Secretary of Commerce and Chair of the RESTORE Council Dec 9 2015 Credit Robert Smith Wildlife Mississippi Last week the Gulf Coast Ecosystem Restoration RESTORE Council approved its first Funded Priorities List FPL of projects and programs to fund with civil penalties available from the Deepwater Horizon oil spill Transocean settlement This is an important step forward for the entire Gulf Coast that is still recovering from the spill In particular for the Mississippi River Delta the FPL demonstrates both the state of Louisiana s commitment to funding Coastal Master Plan projects with RESTORE dollars and progress in implementing the master plan Louisiana submitted five project proposals all of which are projects from the Coastal Master Plan While these projects are still in planning phases they represent critical near term opportunities to keep the Mississippi River Delta on its path to recovery and sustainability The Louisiana master plan projects receiving funding include Golden Triangle Marsh Creation Project 4 3 million planning Mississippi River Reintroduction into Maurepas Swamp Project 14 2 million planning Biloxi Marsh Living Shoreline Project 3 2 million planning West Grand Terre Beach Nourishment and Stabilization Project 7 3 million planning Lowermost Mississippi River Management Program 9 3 million planning Two additional projects Jean Lafitte Canal Backfilling 8 7

    Original URL path: http://www.mississippiriverdelta.org/blog/2015/12/15/52-2-million-in-oil-spill-funds-approved-for-louisiana-coastal-restoration/ (2016-05-01)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Coast 2050's Lasting Impacts on Coastal Restoration | Restore the Mississippi River Delta
    Mid Barataria Sediment Diversion Restore the Coast Science Science and Engineering Special Team SEST Seafood State Legislature The Netherlands Uncategorized Videos Wax Lake Delta Wildlife Coast 2050 s Lasting Impacts on Coastal Restoration November 5 2015 Posted by Elizabeth Van Cleve in 2012 Coastal Master Plan Coastal Protection and Restoration Authority CPRA Louisiana Coastal Area LCA Restoration Projects Water Resources Development Act WRDA By Estelle Robichaux Restoration Project Analyst Environmental Defense Fund and Gaby Garcia Science Intern Environmental Defense Fund This post is part of a series on early restoration planning in Louisiana Be sure to check out our previous posts part one part two and part three Since the early 1990 s the Coastal Wetlands Planning Preservation and Restoration Act CWPPRA has been providing a steady funding stream for Louisiana coastal restoration averaging about 45 million per year Yet despite this funding commitment at the time there was still a void in actionable systematic restoration planning for coastal Louisiana Seeing a need the Louisiana State Wetlands Authority and the CWPRRA Task Force collaborated to develop Coast 2050 a strategic plan for creating an enduring and sustainable Louisiana coast Approved in 1998 the plan was a consensus based stakeholder informed initiative that received explicit support from all 20 coastal parishes Louisiana s coastal parishes This comprehensive plan takes a regional perspective on restoration based on three strategic goals To create and sustain marsh by accumulating sediment and plant matter To maintain habitat diversity by varying salinities and protecting key land forms and To maintain ecosystem connections so there is exchange of energy plants and animals By focusing on these guiding principles the participants in this collaborative effort were able to generate a plan that relies on a variety of restoration tools from shoreline protection and marsh creation to the reintroduction of fresh water and sediment to deteriorating wetlands From Coast 2050 to LCA Study The Louisiana Coastal Area LCA Ecosystem Restoration Study was an outgrowth of Coast 2050 that took the plan s restoration concepts and strategies and formulated them into more specific project ideas that could be analyzed and studied The overall goal of the LCA study was to reverse the trend of coastal ecosystem degradation with a specific focus on using restoration strategies that would reintroduce historic flows of river water nutrients and sediment to the coastal wetlands The results of the study which were finalized and published in 2004 identify 15 projects categorized as critical near term features This means that the project or action addresses essential ecological needs of coastal Louisiana in areas where delaying action would result in greater future restoration costs and possibly a loss of opportunity for restoration Although the approved LCA plan and these 15 critical near term projects were included in the 2007 Water Resources Development Act no funds were actually appropriated for this work Meaning that while the U S Congress authorized the Army Corps of Engineers to work on these coastal restoration projects they did not give them any

    Original URL path: http://www.mississippiriverdelta.org/blog/2015/11/05/coast-2050s-lasting-impacts-on-coastal-restoration/ (2016-05-01)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Bold Recommendations & Early Citizen Support for Diversions as a Key to Coastal Restoration | Restore the Mississippi River Delta
    on early restoration planning in Louisiana Be sure to check out part one for a look back to 1973 In 1988 the Coalition to Restoration Coastal Louisiana CRCL released a plan titled Coastal Louisiana Here today and gone tomorrow The plan which was a joint effort by stakeholders and scientists focuses on the Mississippi River Delta region and is framed as a citizens program for protecting Louisiana s environment economy and heritage The plan provides nearly 20 recommendations including a restoration action program suggestions for how to finance the program as well as specific institutional and legislative recommendations designed to galvanize restoration Among the most notable elements is the assertion that sediment diversions would be the most beneficial method of wetland restoration and that several of them should be constructed along the Mississippi and Atchafalaya Rivers This was also one of the first plans to advise against any new levee construction Many of the plan s most significant propositions those focused on restoration action have yet to be realized though the science behind sediment diversions is well developed and we continue to advocate for them as a sustainable restoration tool A bold but realistic plan of action CRCL s plan has two specific resource goals that are still strongly advocated for To utilize freshwater and sediment diversions along the Mississippi River and Atchafalaya Rivers to sustain and restore coastal wetlands To beneficially use dredged material from channel maintenance and existing spoil banks to backfill canals and nourish created wetlands and barrier islands Restoring natural processes Mississippi River water sediment diversions The Caernarvon and Davis Pond diversions were still being designed at the time this plan was published Although there were expectations these structures would help control saltwater intrusion and reduce wetland loss the plan underscores their limitations in active wetland restoration and land building Despite the fact these diversions were designed for salinity and flood control both areas have seen new land growth though not at the scale or rate anticipated for sediment diversions The action program calls for the construction of a suite of freshwater and sediment diversions to restore hydrologic connections and halt wetland loss The essence of many of these restoration ideas can be found in Louisiana s 2012 Coastal Master Plan CMP Some of the restoration actions proposed in the 1988 plan include One or two diversions from the Atchafalaya River into the Lake Verret Basin and Western Terrebonne marshes 2012 CMP Two diversions from the Atchafalaya will increase freshwater and sediment flows into Terrebonne marshes from Bayou Penchant westward including our of our coalition s 19 priority projects Increase Atchafalaya Flow into Terrebonne Marshes Restoration of Bayou Lafourche into a distributary of the Mississippi River with a diversion into Timbalier Bay 2012 CMP Small scale freshwater diversion from the river into Bayou Lafourche Freshwater and sediment diversions at Bayou Manchac and Blind River to bring Mississippi River water into the degraded swamps south of Lake Maurepas 2012 CMP Two freshwater diversions at Blind River and

    Original URL path: http://www.mississippiriverdelta.org/blog/2015/09/16/bold-recommendations-early-citizen-support-for-diversions-as-a-key-to-coastal-restoration/ (2016-05-01)
    Open archived version from archive



  •