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  • Missouri Herpetological Atlas Project
    nothing less than a clearinghouse for all information related to Missouri s native amphibians and reptiles Project Immerse yourself in the background and history of the project Missouri Learn why Missouri is a great state for herps Species Find maps and photographs of your favorite species Publications Download and print the latest version of the atlas Links Browse more great sites on the net FAQ Got questions We have answers

    Original URL path: http://atlas.moherp.org/ (2016-02-01)
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  • MOHAP - Publications
    Supplement duplex Checklist Daniel R E B S Edmond and J T Briggler 2014 Checklists for Missouri Amphibians and Reptiles for 2013 http atlas moherp org pubs checklist13 pdf simplex Daniel R E B S Edmond and J T Briggler 2014 Checklists for Missouri Amphibians and Reptiles for 2013 http atlas moherp org pubs checklist13 pdf duplex Presentations Edmond B S and R E Daniel 2007 Herpetology Halloween Unnatural Occurrences at the Missouri Kansas Border or Why We Should Be Working with Other States to Understand Species Distributions in Missouri http atlas moherp org pubs mha07 pdf 1 Edmond B S and R E Daniel 2006 Herpetology Halloween Unnatural Occurrences at the Missouri Kansas Border http atlas moherp org pubs khs06 pdf 2 Edmond B S and R E Daniel 2002 The Missouri Herpetological Atlas Project MOHAP An Introduction http atlas moherp org pubs mohap02 pdf 3 Web Site Edmond B S and R E Daniel 2016 Missouri Herpetological Atlas Project http atlas moherp org Accessed 01 February 2016 4 Previous Publications Daniel R E and B S Edmond 2013 Atlas of Missouri Amphibians and Reptiles for 2012 http atlas moherp org pubs atlas12 pdf Daniel R E and B S Edmond 2012 Atlas of Missouri Amphibians and Reptiles for 2011 http atlas moherp org pubs atlas11 pdf Daniel R E and B S Edmond 2010 Atlas of Missouri Amphibians and Reptiles for 2009 http atlas moherp org pubs atlas09 pdf Daniel R E and B S Edmond 2008 Atlas of Missouri Amphibians and Reptiles for 2007 http atlas moherp org pubs atlas07 pdf Daniel R E and B S Edmond 2006 Atlas of Missouri Amphibians and Reptiles for 2005 http atlas moherp org pubs atlas05 pdf Daniel R E and B S Edmond 2005 Atlas of Missouri Amphibians and

    Original URL path: http://atlas.moherp.org/pubs/ (2016-02-01)
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  • MOHAP - Project
    rivers lakes natural divisions sections and an acknowledgements list created for the upcoming atlas update February 2004 A printed atlas update Daniel and Edmond 2004 is released December 2004 Records from the 2004 collecting season added to the database New county records from the database are published Daniel et al 2004 May 2005 A printed atlas update Daniel and Edmond 2005 is released June 2005 Records from the Fort Hays State University Sternberg Museum of Natural HIstory added to the database December 2005 Records from the 2005 collecting season added to the database New county records from the database are published Daniel et al 2005 February 2006 A printed atlas update Daniel and Edmond 2006 is released October 2006 A detailed dataset is obtained for the three tiers of Kansas counties that border Missouri November 2006 An analysis is performed using the Kansas dataset culminating in a presentation at the Symposium on the Peripheral Distribution of the Kansas Herpetofauna at the Thirty Third Annual Meeting of the Kansas Herpetological Society December 2006 An ecoregion section for Missouri and surrounding states is compiled for the upcoming atlas update Records from the 2006 collecting season added to the database New county records from the database are published Daniel et al 2006 January 2007 The project web site is introduced A detailed site history is kept as a separate list September 2007 A second analysis using the Kansas dataset is presented to the Missouri Herpetological Association at its twentieth annual meeting December 2007 Records from the 2007 collecting season added to the database New county records from the database are published Daniel et al 2007 April 2008 A major overhaul of the web site is completed with several new sections created or completed A printed atlas update Daniel and Edmond 2008 is released December 2008 Records from the 2008 collecting season added to the database Atlas database converted to PostgreSQL New atlas database loading and maintenance procedures documented New county records from the database are published Daniel et al 2008 October 2009 Created new tables to store data warehouse information including county and taxon collection summaries posted on the web site December 2009 Records from the 2009 collecting season added to the database Created plug in for Quantum GIS QGIS to export individual maps for use in the printed atlas and on the web site Created new method to produce printed atlas using the Python programming language and an API from ReportLab to produce the final PDF The new document contains many new features including a clickable table of contents new base maps page headers and footers and the ability to print page numbers based on simplex or duplex printing Documented all new procedures using a series of PHP pages Declared entire project free from all proprietary software Anyone using a standard Kubuntu Linux machine should be able to pick up the project using the documented procedures with zero start up cost for software New county records from the database are published Daniel

    Original URL path: http://atlas.moherp.org/project/ (2016-02-01)
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  • MOHAP - Missouri
    the conterminous United States as a hierarchical scheme with Level I corresponding to large regions and Level II and Level III representing successively smaller and more precisely described regions The Environmental Protection Agency 2003 is coordinating an effort to further subdivide Level III regions into Level IV regions Nigh and Schroeder 2002 published Level III and Level IV ecoregions for Missouri Some amphibian and reptile species follow defined ecoregions closely For example the Cave Salamander Eurycea lucifuga is neatly confined to the Ozark Highlands Level III and found throughout the ecoregion with the exception of most of the Springfield Plateau Level IV Several species found in the southeastern alluvial plain are particularly characteristic and also confined to that area e g Three toed Amphiuma Amphiuma tridactylum and Southern Watersnake Nerodia fasciata Many species however seem to be abundant throughout Missouri regardless of the region or natural community The Bullfrog Lithobates catesbeianus Eastern Snapping Turtle Chelydra serpentina and Western Ratsnake Pantherophis obsoletus among several others fall into this category Finally many species are more closely associated with a particular natural community or habitat than with a particular ecoregion or natural division For example The Flat headed Snake Tantilla gracilis can be found in the Ozark Highlands Osage Prairie and Interior River Valleys and Hills but it is restricted to rocky glades In general Level IV ecoregions are too granular to be useful in describing the distributions of Missouri amphibians and reptiles several Ozark salamander species and many of the coastal plains species being notable exceptions However this level of detail is useful to understand natural community distributions on which some species are dependent It also underscores the importance of looking at border states and across artificial political boundaries to understand distributions within Missouri Level I Figure 2 Level II Figure 3 Level III Figure 4 and Level IV Figure 5 ecoregion maps for Missouri and surrounding states based on Omernik 1987 and Nigh and Schroeder 2002 are included here The hierarchy for all levels are included in Table 2 below Unfortunately the authors coding scheme for Level III is inconsistent though the names do match Both authors codes for Level III are included as a cross reference For example Omernik coded the Ozark Highlands as 8 4 5 but Nigh and Schroeder used 39 for the same region Table 2 Ecoregion hierarchy for Missouri based on Omernik 1987 and Nigh and Schroeder 2002 Those regions marked with an asterisk do not occur in Missouri but are sufficiently close to be of interest to Missouri biologists Those regions marked with a caret are contained entirely within the state s borders 8 Eastern Temperate Forests 8 3 Southeastern USA Plains 8 3 3 Interior Plateau 71 71m Northern Shawnee Hills 71n Southern Shawnee Hills 8 3 6 Mississippi Valley Loess Plains 74 74a Bluff Hills 74b Loess Plains 8 3 2 Interior River Valleys and Hills 72 72a Wabash Ohio Bottomlands 72d Upper Mississippi Alluvial Plain 72e Middle Mississippi Alluvial Plain 72f River Hills 72g Southern Ozarkian River Bluffs 72i Western Dissected Illinoian Till Plain 72j Southern Illinoian Till Plain 72k Cretaceous Hills 72l Karstic Northern Ozarkian River Bluffs 8 4 Ozark Ouachita Appalachian Forests 8 4 5 Ozark Highlands 39 39a Springfield Plateau 39b Elk River Hills 39c White River Hills 39d Central Plateau 39e Osage Gasconade River Hills 39f Saint Francois Knobs Basins 39g Meramec River Hills 39h Current River Hills 39i Eastern Ozark Border 39j Black River Hills Border 39k Prairie Ozark Border 8 4 6 Boston Mountains 38 38a Upper Boston Mountains 38b Lower Boston Mountains 8 5 Southeast US Coastal Plain 8 5 2 Mississippi Alluvial Plain 73 73a Northern Holocene Meander Belts 73b Northern Pleistocene Valley Trains 73c Saint Francis Lowlands 73f Western Lowlands Holocene Meander Belts 73g Western Lowlands Pleistocene Valley Trains 9 Great Plains 9 2 Temperate Prairies 9 2 3 Western Corn Belt Plains 47 47d Missouri Alluvial Plain 47e Steeply Rolling Loess Prairies 47f Rolling Loess Prairies 47h Nebraska Kansas Loess Hills 47i Loess and Glacial Drift Hills 47m Western Loess Hills 9 2 4 Central Irregular Plains 40 40a Loess Flats and Till Plains 40b Osage Cuestas 40c Wooded Osage Plains 40d Cherokee Plains 40e Claypan Prairie Prior to Omernik s ecoregion classification scheme Thom and Wilson 1980 divided Missouri into natural divisions and sections Figure 6 roughly corresponding to Level III and Level IV ecoregions respectively Although the boundaries are a bit different in some cases most regions are easily recognized between the two schemes Thom and Wilson s work is included here particularly since they used historical names e g Crowley s Ridge for some regions rather than the more generic terms used by the ecoregion authors A complete list of Missour s natural division and sections can be found in Table 3 Figure 6 Natural divisions and sections of Missouri Key to natural divisions and sections is contained within the main text Click on the map to see a larger version Modified from Thom and Wilson 1980 Base map from MSDIS 2009 and MDC 2007 Table 3 List of Missouri Natural Divisions and Sections Glaciated Plains Western Grand River Eastern Lincoln Hills Ozark Border Missouri River Mississippi River Big Rivers Upper Missouri within Glaciated Plains Lower Missouri within Ozark Border Upper Mississippi north of Saint Louis Lower Mississippi south of Saint Louis Osage Plains Ozark Highlands Springfield Plateau Upper Ozark Saint Francois Mountains Elk River White River Lower Ozark Mississippi Lowlands Crowley s Ridge Lowlands Rivers and Watersheds Figure 7 Major rivers and streams in Missouri Click to see a labelled map Modified from MDC 2007 and USGS 1994 Figure 8 Major Missouri watersheds Click to see a labelled map Based on data from NRCS 2002 Base map from MSDIS 2009 Missouri is home to four major river drainages a Mississippi River b Missouri River c Arkansas River and d White River with the latter three ultimately flowing into the Mississippi Included within these drainages are dozens of larger

    Original URL path: http://atlas.moherp.org/missouri/ (2016-02-01)
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  • MOHAP - Species List (Group)
    Lithobates catesbeianus Shaw 1802 American Bullfrog Lithobates clamitans Latreille 1801 Green Frog Lithobates palustris LeConte 1825 Pickerel Frog Lithobates pipiens Schreber 1782 Northern Leopard Frog Lithobates sphenocephalus Cope 1886 Southern Leopard Frog Lithobates sylvaticus LeConte 1825 Wood Frog Gastrophryne carolinensis Holbrook 1835 Eastern Narrow mouthed Toad Gastrophryne olivacea Hallowell 1856 Western Narrow mouthed Toad Lizards Lacertilia Crotaphytus collaris Say 1823 Eastern Collared Lizard Phrynosoma cornutum Harlan 1825 Texas Horned Lizard Sceloporus consobrinus Baird and Girard 1853 Prairie Lizard Aspidoscelis sexlineata Linnaeus 1766 Six lined Racerunner Plestiodon anthracinus Baird 1850 Southern Coal Skink Plestiodon fasciatus Linnaeus 1758 Common Five lined Skink Plestiodon laticeps Schneider 1801 Broad headed Skink Plestiodon obsoletus Baird and Girard 1852 Great Plains Skink Plestiodon septentrionalis Baird 1859 Prairie Skink Scincella lateralis Say in James 1823 Little Brown Skink Ophisaurus attenuatus Cope 1880 Western Slender Glass Lizard Snakes Serpentes Carphophis vermis Kennicott 1859 Western Wormsnake Cemophora coccinea Blumenbach 1788 Northern Scarletsnake Clonophis kirtlandii Kennicott 1856 Kirtland s Snake Coluber constrictor Linnaeus 1758 North American Racer Coluber flagellum Shaw 1802 Eastern Coachwhip Diadophis punctatus Linnaeus 1766 Ring necked Snake Farancia abacura Holbrook 1836 Western Mudsnake Heterodon gloydi Edgren 1952 Dusty Hog nosed Snake Heterodon nasicus Baird and Girard 1852 Plains Hog nosed Snake Heterodon platirhinos Latreille 1801 Eastern Hog nosed Snake Lampropeltis calligaster Harlan 1827 Prairie Kingsnake Lampropeltis holbrooki Stejneger 1903 Speckled Kingsnake Lampropeltis triangulum Lacépède 1789 Red Milksnake Nerodia cyclopion Duméril Bibron and Dumeril 1854 Mississippi Green Watersnake Nerodia erythrogaster Forster 1771 Plain bellied Watersnake Nerodia fasciata Linnaeus 1766 Broad banded Watersnake Nerodia rhombifer Hallowell 1852 Diamond backed Water Snake Nerodia sipedon Linnaeus 1758 Common Watersnake Opheodrys aestivus Linnaeus 1766 Northern Rough Greensnake Opheodrys vernalis Harlan 1827 Smooth Greensnake Pantherophis emoryi Baird and Girard 1853 Great Plains Ratsnake Pantherophis obsoletus Say 1823 Western Ratsnake Pantherophis ramspotti Crother White

    Original URL path: http://atlas.moherp.org/species/ (2016-02-01)
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  • MOHAP - Links
    downloaded gratis from the Missouri Spatial Data Information Service MSDIS There are many sources of consumer grade mapping products available from dedicated GPS units to smartphone applications or simply the web GRASS is professional grade open source GIS package QGIS is a user friendly GIS viewer that integrates tightly with PostGIS a spatial extension for the open source database PostgreSQL Other gratis packages and data for GIS applications can be found at the FreeGIS site Finally GeoCommunity is an on line community of GIS CAD GPS and other mapping professionals Many links that were previously listed on the links page at the Missouri Herpetological Association site were moved here In general sites concerned with distribution or species accounts were moved here and those concerned with conservation education or other organizations were left there Missouri Center for Agricultural Resource and Environmental Services CARES Missouri Department of Conservation Amphibians and Reptiles of Missouri frogs hellbenders herps lizards snakes turtles Missouri Herpetological Association Missouri Spatial Data Information Service MSDIS Missouri State University Biology Bull Shoals Field Station University of Missouri Columbia Biological Sciences Fisheries and Wildlife Border states Atlas of Amphibians in Tennessee Atlas of Reptiles in Tennessee Herps of Arkansas Illinois Natural

    Original URL path: http://atlas.moherp.org/links/ (2016-02-01)
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  • MOHAP - Frequently Asked Questions
    because early collectors or museums did not record them Also localities were not considered as important as they are today and some localities might have been the origin of specimens collected e g a package that arrives from Saint Louis or even the town where the collecter lived regardless of the actual collection site Most of these we tried to accommodate if they were at all reasonable Many records were labelled with a locality of simply Saint Louis or Kansas City and they got plotted accordingly It s difficult to justify removing a record even as we realize that some are probably erroneous Which ones are the result of poor by our standards record keeping It s impossible to tell from just the sparse collection data If we thought a record was completely unreasonable for an area we simply omitted the record from the atlas On the other hand large urban areas were very well collected due to their proximity to a greater number of collectors than rural areas It s not unreasonable to believe that the Saint Louis or Kansas City areas have valid records for a large number of species some of which might no longer be found easily or at all It should be mentioned that some collections were more likely actually made in the vicinity of a large urban area rather than downtown However we would have no way of really guessing from which direction we should plot a locality so we deemed it preferable to just pick the central location On the other hand older collections made in the immediate vicinity of urban areas might actually be valid since much of the urbanization and resulting habitat destruction occurred well within the time frame of historical collections How did you determine the coordinates for localities A combination of techniques were used to plot localities If a locality was a known geological geographical or cultural feature in the GNIS database or a reference thereof those coordinates were used to estimate a location For example Saint Louis was plotted as the actual GNIS location for Saint Louis even though this could mean Saint Louis vicinity Forest Park or even Saint Louis County If a distance reference was made that was taken into consideration For example Kansas City 10 mi E was literally plotted as 10 air miles east of downtown Kansas City Much of this was done programmatically since an estimate of location was sufficient for our purposes The GNIS database is very comprehensive but many localities could not be determined In those cases we consulted old maps searched for on line references and even found a few places by travelling through an area As a general rule a specified county took priority over a locality Thus if a record had a locality of Jackson Co Kansas City 20 mi E and the literal point 20 miles east of Kansas City put the locality in Lafayette Co MO the locality was backed off to be included in Jackson

    Original URL path: http://atlas.moherp.org/faq/ (2016-02-01)
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  • MOHAP - Central Newt (Notophthalmus viridescens) photo
    any browser or Internet device Missouri Herpetological Atlas Project Skip site navigation Home Project Missouri Species Publications Links FAQ Central Newt Notophthalmus viridescens This Central Newt Notophthalmus viridescens was observed in Taney County Missouri To view a list of all Missouri salamanders click over to the species page Copyright 1997 2016 Brian S Edmond and Richard E Daniel All rights reserved About this site Current 01 Feb 2016 8 21am

    Original URL path: http://atlas.moherp.org/photo/?novi (2016-02-01)
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