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  • MBC's Palm Walk
    vista into a grove of silver blue leaved Bismarckia nobilis palms with a backdrop of taller dark green Washingtonia filifera palms At the Bismarckia terminus one can gaze further south down a second vista into a group of blue green leaved Serenoa repens with a backdrop of dark green Arenga microcarpa At the Serenoa the path turns into and terminates in the formal Palm Circle composed of two rows of thick trunked Sabal causiarum palms Only wild collected material is allowed in the Palm Walk and an accession must contain at least seven plants Accessions containing fewer than seven plants are planted elsewhere at MBC It is estimated that the Palm Walk will contain over 5 000 specimens when the walk is fully planted The Walk is divided into nine parts defined by the main vista path and various east west roads on the property with additional paths allowing easy access to the collection The main path is close to 1 740 feet in length 1 3 mile or 1 2 kilometer Montgomery Botanical Center s Palm Walk covers approximately 19 acres In the center foreground is Corypha taliera which is now extinct in the wild and was collected from India by Shri Dhar in 1996 To the back left are Livistona muelleri and to the back right are Livistona lanuginosa both collected from Australia by John Dowe in 1996 Ridge Road is a part of the Palm Walk On the left is Livistona saribus collected in Vietnam by Si Lin Yang in 1994 and Livistona decipiens collected from Australia by John Dowe in 1996 On the right are Caryota rumphiana collected from the Papua New Guinea by Rolf Kyburz in 1996 and Dictyosperma album collected from Reunion Island in 1995 by Montgomery Botanical Center s palm biologist Dr Larry

    Original URL path: http://www.montgomerybotanical.org/Pages/Collection_Palm_Walk.htm (2016-02-10)
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  • MBC's Palm Collection Today
    Montgomery Botanical Center s living palm collection one of the most scientifically valuable collections in the United States today and valuable for scientific research Most of these trees came from nurseries and were planted in 1932 On the left is Phoenix canariensis behind it are two Phoenix reclinata in the center is a Chinese fan palm Livistona chinensis to the right is Attalea butyracea and on the extreme right is Caryota mitis In 1933 Dr David Fairchild collected this particular Attalea butyracea from a garden in Trinidad The mother plant was reported to have come from Brazil Nypa fruticans are thought to be the most primitive of the palms Dr P B Tomlinson a recognized authority on palm anatomy and morphology collected these from Malaysia in 1982 The Arthur Montgomery Guesthouse is available for scientists conducting research at Montgomery Botanical Center MBC s collections development department is available to support scientific research with current maps of the property and an extensive database of information on the collections MBC can offer security for the scientist to mount long term experiments with the confidence that experiments will not be disturbed The quality of MBC s palm collection is becoming internationally known and

    Original URL path: http://www.montgomerybotanical.org/Pages/Collection_Palm_Collection.htm (2016-02-10)
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  • MBC's Cycad Walk
    completed in 2003 and now consists of 15 Asia beds 2 Africa beds 6 America beds and 3 Australia beds Shortly thereafter the area was re named the Cycad Geographic Collection In 2001 due in part to the success of the numerous international expeditions MBC has undertaken contributions from individuals and other institutions throughout the world and the large number of new cycad populations and taxa being discovered and described Sasaki Associates critically evaluated the 1995 Cycad Walk design with respect to available planting space Based on their evaluation the Cycad Walk area was doubled to include over 13 acres of the 120 acre property The 1995 design plan by Sasaki Associates for MBC s Cycad Walk At the top is Nell s House where the Cycad Walk begins We estimate the area will ultimately contain approximately 5 000 cycads when completed Instead of moving east to west the main path of the Cycad Walk now runs north to south to take advantage of the full length of the property This new addition to the Cycad Walk has been named the Cycad Ecologic Collection Sasaki Associates conceptual drawing of the 2002 Cycad Walk expansion The planting design within Cycad Ecologic

    Original URL path: http://www.montgomerybotanical.org/Pages/Collection_Cycad_Walk.htm (2016-02-10)
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  • History of the Cycad Collection at Montgomery Botanical Center
    Palmetum until his death in 1953 In 1959 Nell Montgomery Robert s wife created The Montgomery Foundation now Montgomery Botanical Center to support research on tropical plants and to promote her husband s name Through the 1960s 1970s and 1980s the cycad collection on the property continued to slowly expand In 1990 Nell Montgomery passed away leaving the buildings the 120 acre property and the plant collections to Montgomery Botanical Center s Board of Directors oversight Today the purpose of Montgomery Botanical Center s cycad collection is to offer the horticulture scientific and educational communities scientifically useful population based samples of cycads for research and educational purposes The same 1932 plant of Microcycas calocoma RM384 in 1993 With that in mind Montgomery Botanical Center s main focus is to develop its collections with as many wild collected documented population samples as possible Montgomery Botanical Center s cycad collection will therefore differ from most botanical gardens since the emphasis is on maximizing the morphologic and genetic diversity among populations within a taxon and not taxon diversity Montgomery Botanical Center s first sponsored cycad expedition was to southern China in 1992 Since then Montgomery Botanical Center MBC has executed an average of two expeditions each year to continue the development of a population based cycad collection In 2001 MBC completed expeditions to Belize Ecuador Mexico and Panama to support the expansion of its New World cycad collection A wonderful article by Virginia Hayes and Jeff Chemnick on the Mexico 2001 Expedition can be found in Volume 10 Number 2 of the Lotusland Newsletter Former Executive Director Dr Terrence Walters with MBC s Stangeria collection Data from new collections are continually being recorded in MBC s plant database MBC documents its collections from the time seed is collected from a plant in the

    Original URL path: http://www.montgomerybotanical.org/Pages/Collection_Cycad_History.htm (2016-02-10)
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  • History of the Palm Collection at Montgomery Botanical Center
    Brazil Tanzania and Malaysia Arthur C Langlois Madagascar Dr Harold E Moore Malaysia Australia Comoros Vanuatu Costa Rica and Mexico Dr Richard Moyroud USA Dr Robert Read Hispaniola and Jamaica Dr P B Tomlinson Trinidad and Tobago and Malaysia Nina Woessner Costa Rica After Nell Montgomery s death in 1990 The Montgomery Foundation became active and began rebuilding the collections with wild well documented material Rebuilding the Collections 1992 through 2001 In 1992 The Montgomery Foundation supported its first expeditions The first expedition was to Brazil and was organized and conducted by Dr Larry Noblick Later in 1992 Dr Terrence Walters conducted an expedition to China In 1998 the Foundation voted to change its name to Montgomery Botanical Center MBC MBC s focus on building high quality collections for scientific research continued There were 41 expeditions from 1992 through 2001 All were supported by MBC see Expeditions Some people who participated in the planning and mounting of these palm and cycad collecting expeditions include Russell Adams James Cornett Hazel Cropper Dr John Donaldson Dr John Dowe Nancy Edmondson George Eiton Don Evans Bernard Fisher Dr William Hahn Blas Hermaez Dr John Janovec Rolf Kyburz Tom Milledge Victor Miller Dr Larry

    Original URL path: http://www.montgomerybotanical.org/Pages/Collection_Palm_History2.htm (2016-02-10)
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  • Hurricane Katrina Damage Photos MBC
    bed This gumbo limbo that fell down narrowly missed several cycads Zamia inermis plants barely escaped damage from a snapped tree A large uprooted tree went down in an area where it did no damage Gumbo limbo tree landed on the crown of a Cycas tansachana Closeup of gumbo limbo branch on the crown of a Cycas tansachana Cycas thouarsii uprooted by the wind Encephalartos lehmanii escaped damage from a

    Original URL path: http://www.montgomerybotanical.org/Pages/Katrina_Damage_Photos.htm (2016-02-10)
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  • Hurricane Katrina Cleanup Photos at MBC
    the Loop Road Patrick Christina and Ericka assess the best way to remove an oak tree Christina prepares to start cutting an oak tree that can t be saved Christine clears tree limbs from on top of Cycas micronesica plants Charles cuts up a black olive tree that fell in a tropical Zamia bed Abbey and Charles clear a downed black olive with several species of tropical zamias in the

    Original URL path: http://www.montgomerybotanical.org/Pages/Katrina_Cleanup_Photos.htm (2016-02-10)
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  • Hurricane Wilma Damage Photos at MBC (p. 1)
    100 feet away the photo on the right shows how this branch matches up with the place where it broke off The large banyan tree Ficus benghalensis in the Cycad Walk suffered some serious damage this time this tree weathered Hurricane Andrew Hurricane Katrina and other storms without receiving this much damage All of the sausage like fruit dropped off of this African sausage tree Kigelia africana This sausage tree lost a huge branch in the employee parking lot Not a good parking place This large oak tree is dwarfed by the giant gumbo limbo trees in the background that were almost completely untouched This Bulnesia arborea snapped while others on the property were blown down the foliage is so dense in these trees they act like umbrellas in the wind The Cycad Collection As with Katrina most of the cycads fared quite well during Wilma this Cycas litoralis lost most of its leaves but it will recover completely Many of the bamboo cycads in the Asia 4 bed e g Cycas bifida C micholitzii C multipinnata also lost leaves but should recover fully Even though it looks like it took a direct hit from a large oak tree the

    Original URL path: http://www.montgomerybotanical.org/Pages/Wilma_Damage_Photos1.htm (2016-02-10)
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