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  • Street of Paris - Maximilien Luce | Museo Thyssen
    clearly not remain indifferent to the experience of colour division he never assimilated without restriction the neo Impressionist influence His independent character could not accept without reticence a theory with such clearly defined limits Let us say that he remained with regard to the neo impressionists a sympathiser who knew how to assimilate their experiments and their use of pure colour But this did not prevent him from having his own views Luce let himself more willingly be guided by his instinct than by theory following in this regard the example of Pissarro who only experimented with Pointillism for a short period This explains the fact that Luce alternated between the divisionist technique which marked most of his works between 1888 and 1897 and a freer style with a wider brushstroke Clearly the divided stroke slows down the process of painting and this became an annoying curb for such a spontaneous painter as Luce proved to be Between 1888 and 1892 he exhibited every year in the Salon des Indépendants where he presented mainly views of Paris and of its suburbs This Street of Paris composed entirely in perspective dates from this period It is one of the many paintings in which Luce bearing witness to his time enjoyed showing the bustling streets and river banks where each character of the crowd is not only present but alive After studying them through many sketches Luce painted them with a few quick brushstrokes In his preface to the catalogue of the 1958 retrospective at the Maison de la Pensée Française Georges Besson wrote about Luce in the following terms What other contemporary painter was such a penetrating portraitist Who evoked with such power of means the misery of the soldiers on leave at the Gare de l Est in 1916 the

    Original URL path: http://www.museothyssen.org/en/thyssen/ficha_obra/612 (2016-02-13)
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  • Banks of the RIver Marne near Montévrain - Henri Lebasque | Museo Thyssen
    Divisionism had just appeared and like Cross and Van Rysselberghe Lebasque could not totally escape the influence of Seurat s technique But very soon Lebasque abandoned this school whose limits were too narrow and restrictive for an artist who liked above all to show in his paintings his own vision of nature Similarly his friendship with the Fauves and with Manguin never prevailed over his slightly introvert but also tenacious personality Married and with children Lebasque moved to the east of Paris in 1900 and remained there until 1906 he took up residence first in Pierrefonds and Montévrain where the neo Impressionists met up Lebasque was using some Pointillism when he moved with his family to Lagny on the banks of the Marne where he stayed for about five years This was one of the most fruitful periods of his life There still under the influence of Impressionism he was overcome by the joy of painting outside his pictures already reflected his joie de vivre His landscapes bright or delicately coloured are full of freshness while at the same time they convey the soft light of the Île de France In the Marne valley he found a myriad of simple and pretty landscapes and a river running quietly between grassy verges often lined with trees the light is slightly filtered almost damp and gives his paintings a charming delicacy In the area of Lagny Lebasque had also met Pissarro and his luminosity influenced him more than the remembrance of Bonnat s teaching Here the artist led a simple life contemplating nature and its changes with the passing of hours and days In such quiet surroundings his talent gradually developed and asserted itself It was during these laborious years that Lebasque painted many times the banks of the Marne under a sky tinted with subtle hues in which he expressed the deep emotions conveyed by the delicate light of the Île de France which reminds us of Sisley s paintings The rustling trees whose branches filter the light frame the scenery with bright meadows spreading in perspective Nobody has summed up better Lebasque and his art than Louis Vauxcelles in the catalogue of the exhibition held at the Galerie Pétridès in 1938 Lebasque was as intelligent as he was sensitive impulsive with his own personal culture and he never ceased to reflect upon the principles and conditions of his art Technique the study of form the concern for balance and rhythm obsessed him Nevertheless he had kept the divine gift of childhood marvelling at the vast spectacle of Nature and he knew that according to Nietzsche s words for a poet to say no to nature is madness He painted as a bird sings when it sings well a smooth and expressive drawing elegance of lines freshness and haziness transparency of shadows But Lebasque soon grew tired of systematic monotonous impersonal Pointillism as fantasy and the painter s own temperament did not counterbalance the strictness of the theory It was precisely

    Original URL path: http://www.museothyssen.org/en/thyssen/ficha_obra/666 (2016-02-13)
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  • Saint-Palais-la-Pierrière. Low Tide - Armand Guillaumin | Museo Thyssen
    two short visits one to Jullouville Manche in 1873 the other picture dated in 1882 shows the Outer Harbour in Dieppe But it was in 1892 and 1893 that he painted various series of sea views at Saint Palais and in the Midi at Agay Saint Palais a small seaside resort near Royan on the Atlantic coast was the subject of about twenty paintings and a number of studies with charcoal and pastels The inscription at the back of the Thyssen Bornemisza painting shows how the artist worked from this period onward he scrupulously noted down on the back of the canvas or on the stretcher the year the season the time and even sometimes the weather TG means temps gris grey weather in order to take up the painting again under the same weather conditions and the same light He would take with him two canvases usually of different sizes and when he judged that the light had changed he turned his easel round to face the opposite side and started working on the other canvas The representation of a subject under all weather conditions and his concern for painting a picture always under the same light motivated him all his life As an old man he would still set off at 5 o clock in the morning to catch the effects of the mist on the Sédelle one kilometre away from Crozan having hired the services of a boy from the village to carry his materials by them too heavy for him Guillaumin worked without pause and his studio filled up with paintings he would take to exhibitions Three canvases of Saint Palais were shown in the retrospective exhibition which the Galeries Durand Ruel dedicated to him in Paris at the beginning of 1894 among which was the one from the Personnaz collection donated to the Musée de Bayonne Inv Pers n 73 Guillaumin found inspiration in simple compositions showing a strong and innate ability to see things from the inside a characteristic which reveals the man from Central France solid with a tempered though occasionally rough character La Pierrière the Platin rock the cliff the low tide the rising tide are some of the subjects represented in this series of paintings about Saint Palais The Low Tide of August 1892 presented in 1913 at the Salon de la Libre Esthétique in Brussels and even more the Rising Tide of September 92 sold in Paris Espace Cardin 18 June 1973 represent less static and more interesting compositions The Saint Palais from the Carmen Thyssen Bornemisza Collection is built around two sections of the same importance linked by a few elements like the top of the rocks and the sails of the boats The wide but short brushstrokes sculpt the rock and the darker areas applying a thicker coat of paint in stronger browns and reds which totally contrast with the areas hit by the light In the foreground a few touches of blue and pale green serve as

    Original URL path: http://www.museothyssen.org/en/thyssen/ficha_obra/698 (2016-02-13)
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  • The Orchard at Éragny - Camille Pissarro | Museo Thyssen
    effect of brilliant sunlight on green grass Pissarro made the space and character of the sun struck green field in Éragny interesting by positioning himself so that the varyingly curved trunks of the fruit trees within it played rhythmic visual games with the shadows cast by the trees on the field This chess set of positions is animated by Pissarro s careful placement of two rural workers a female carrying a basket in the middle ground and another further back who seems to have some laundry over her shoulder We feel the heat of this Norman day as the individually painted leaves of near and distant trees seem to tremble in a gentle breeze Pissarro had tired of the meticulously rendered dotted surfaces of Scientific Impressionism at least years before loosening his facture while adhering to the chromatic lessons of simultaneous contrast and chromatic intensity he practised with more theoretical acumen in the latter 1880s The Carmen Thyssen Bornemisza painting seems almost to be a pair of another of the four canvases Soleil Couchant a Éragny 1896 PV 974 which is of identical dimensions and represent precisely the same field with the same haystack observed from a different vantage point at a different time In fact the group of four paintings were made throughout several similar summer days one begun in the morning La Grange matin Éragny c 1896 PV 975 two at mid day Le Clos a Éragny 1896 and Sous le noyer a Éragny 1896 PV 976 and the fourth at sunset Soleil Couchant a Éragny 1896 PV 974 Pissarro complained of the uncertain weather in the same letter using it as an explanation for the fact that he ventured only slightly outside the compound of his house and studio into the adjacent field Interestingly this small group

    Original URL path: http://www.museothyssen.org/en/thyssen/ficha_obra/798 (2016-02-13)
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  • Women Sewing - Albert André | Museo Thyssen
    of painting the titles of his works testify to it Woman in Blue 1894 Woman with Peacocks 1895 he turned to indoor scenes where the artificial light of a lamp reveals the charm of everyday middle class objects and the protagonists with simplified outlines read day dream chat or drowse Women Sewing is the open air version of the indoor scenes of families gathered under the lamplight The painting is composed like an indoor scene but the sunlight replaces the lamplight It is a warm light that of the south of France of the village of Laudun Gard where the artist had spent his holidays since his childhood When Albert André painted Women Sewing he had already been noticed by Thadée Nathanson the founder of the Revue Blanche who wrote about him His compositions show a pleasant style and an easy boldness Skillfully composed joyously coloured these works are those of a painter smitten with light and modern life who takes his subjects from everyday life He is the painter of simple happiness In the foreground three women sew in the shade of eucalyptus or plane trees There everything is roundness roundness of the skirts roundness of the movements of a back of a hat and of a garden table which contrasts with the three rigidly vertical lines of the trees The faces and the movements are concentrated on the work They are not portraits Each face is barely suggested by a simple point which marks the eye Who these women are is not important they are part of the house of the landscape and contribute to the harmony of the painting to its colourful and bright composition The eye attracted by the whiteness of the work which contrasts with the red dress then moves to the path lined with

    Original URL path: http://www.museothyssen.org/en/thyssen/ficha_obra/643 (2016-02-13)
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  • Untitled (Green on Maroon) - Mark Rothko | Museo Thyssen
    subject to the terms of use Use for educational purposes is defined as the non commercial use of images in presentations lectures school or university projects and academic or research publications of which no more than 1 000 not for profit copies are printed Inquiries regarding other uses should be directed to the Museum s Picture Library For other uses of the images please contact the Picture Library where you can purchase or lease photographic material of works from the Collection that can be used in publications available for commercial use Terms of use 1 The Thyssen Bornemisza Collection Foundation shall not be held liable for any third party use of images on the website that fails to comply with these terms of use 2 If the image is to be reproduced the work must be reproduced in full Users may only reproduce a detail or cropped section of the work after obtaining written permission from the Fundación Colección Thyssen Bornemisza In such cases the image credits must clearly indicate the word detail 3 The image may not be manipulated changed modified or altered in any way In particular the reproduction may not be superimposed with any other images or text 4 Permission to reproduce an image is granted solely for private or educational purposes Use for educational purposes is defined as the non commercial use of images in presentations lectures school or university projects and academic or research publications of which no more than 1 000 not for profit copies are printed The material may not be reproduced without first obtaining a licence from VEGAP described in paragraph 6 5 If the images are being used for purposes other than those described above prior written permission from the Fundación Colección Thyssen Bornemisza is required 6 The reproduction of the

    Original URL path: http://www.museothyssen.org/en/thyssen/zoom_obra/839 (2016-02-13)
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  • Museo Thyssen-Bornemisza. Inicio
    painting By the early 1950s Rothko had developed a personal abstract language which he continued to refine and simplify throughout the following twenty years His canvases which are generally large as he believed they would inspire greater intimacy when viewed are divided into several rectangular more or less horizontal open and vibrant fields of colour which bear no relationship to geometry and appear to float in an indeterminate space The paint applied in a series of thin layers as if it were watercolour instead of oil never reveals the brushstrokes and texture is reduced to its minimum expression Rothko conceived his works as dramas as the performance of a timeless tragedy His paintings infused with great spiritual intensity engage the viewer with great emotional force inspiring contemplation and meditation Robert Rosenblum described Rothko s painting as abstraction of the sublime and related it to the Romantic tradition of the northern European countries According to this author Rothko s paintings like those of Friedrich a century before him look for the sublime in a profane world Rothko considered pure colour to be the best means of expressing emotions and in this respect he can be linked to Kandinsky s mystic theories of abstraction Like Kandinsky Rothko believed that colour acted directly on the human soul and was capable of eliciting deep emotions in the viewer During the early 1960s the bright powerful tones of his earlier paintings which have a sort of expansive radiating effect were replaced by dull shades of maroon grey dark green and brown resulting in more hermetic and even more awe inspiring works In 1961 the same year Rothko painted the Green on Maroon belonging to the Museo Thyssen Bornemisza The Museum of Modern Art held a major exhibition of his works the first one man show

    Original URL path: http://www.museothyssen.org/en/thyssen/imprimirFicha/839 (2016-02-13)
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  • Pillars of Hercules - Morris Louis | Museo Thyssen
    of his generation Louis was concerned with material processes and optical problems but evolved towards a less heroic and more lyrical style of painting which made him one of the favourite artists of the formalist critics Clement Greenberg and Michael Fried His personal style began to take shape in 1953 when he travelled from Washington to New York where he not only saw Pollock s first paintings for himself but also together with Greenberg and his painter friend Kenneth Noland visited Helen Frankenthaler The sight of Mountains and Sea on her studio easel was a sort of apparition that would mark his subsequent artistic development Pillars of Hercules belongs to a set of Pillars painted in summer 1960 in which Louis refined the technique of spilling thin layers of paint onto the canvas which he had begun in the cycle of Veils in previous years In the large works belonging to this series the artist poured on the paint in parallel bands of opaque colours that ran across the canvas In this technique the acrylic colours greatly diluted with turpentine very quickly soaked the canvas staining it and becoming an irreversible part of it Jackson Pollock s drip technique eliminated the painter s contact with the canvas surface and Louis also abstained from intervening in the execution process by allowing the colours to follow their own logic driven by the force of gravity resulting in compositions with a highly spontaneous appearance However this spontaneity is offset by the ordered symmetrical compositional scheme that is fully under the artist s control In the composition of Pillars of Hercules the bands of colour leave the canvas bare in the centre creating the sensation of a void The same metaphor of emptiness is found in the last series Louis produced the so called

    Original URL path: http://www.museothyssen.org/en/thyssen/ficha_obra/338 (2016-02-13)
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