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  • Museum of Making Music - Distribution
    12 MusicVentures Title One Fieldtrips S T E A M Guitar Lab Families Kids Programs for Adults New Horizons Band North Coast Strings Outreach Partnerships Music Teachers Support Become a Member Become a Volunteer Special Funds Donor Recognition Donate to MoMM News Press Room Media Coverage Notes Newsletter Shop Browse Store Policies Privacy Policy Distribution Taxing Changes The McKinley Tariff Act of 1890 created problems for musical instrument importers because it raised the tax on foreign made instruments Large New York importers such as C Bruno Son and August Pollman saw their profits drop from over 250 000 a year to 100 000 in 1892 Many smaller companies went out of business Others began distributing instruments made by a fast growing number of American manufacturers Distributors often stenciled their own better known name on the smaller maker s products These were called stencil brands The business of importing and distributing musical instruments was centered in New York during this period Companies used letters small catalogs and traveling salesmen to sell their products Some salesmen had such bad reputations that the industry issued policies of conduct to halt the loose methods of roadmen Overview Gallery 1 Overview Popular Music Innovations Music

    Original URL path: http://www.museumofmakingmusic.org/gallery1/distribution (2016-02-18)
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  • Museum of Making Music - Manufacturing
    E A M Guitar Lab Families Kids Programs for Adults New Horizons Band North Coast Strings Outreach Partnerships Music Teachers Support Become a Member Become a Volunteer Special Funds Donor Recognition Donate to MoMM News Press Room Media Coverage Notes Newsletter Shop Browse Store Policies Privacy Policy Manufacturing An Innovative Industry By 1890 the music industry was one of the largest and most innovative in America Two hundred fifty piano makers produced over 90 000 pianos a year Many built state of the art factories to meet demand Profits were high but wages were low and the workday long When varnishers at 28 piano factories went on strike in 1891 57 factory owners organized the American Piano Manufacturers Association of New York to break the strike Their efforts failed due to a nationwide shift to a shorter work day but the association continued to address industry issues Two federal laws had an impact on music manufacturers The McKinley Tariff Act of 1890 protected U S makers from imports prompting dozens of fretted and band instrument makers to open for business Then in 1909 the corporate income tax forced manufacturers to change from a cash to a double entry accounting system

    Original URL path: http://www.museumofmakingmusic.org/gallery1/manufacturing (2016-02-18)
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  • Museum of Making Music - NAMM History
    12 MusicVentures Title One Fieldtrips S T E A M Guitar Lab Families Kids Programs for Adults New Horizons Band North Coast Strings Outreach Partnerships Music Teachers Support Become a Member Become a Volunteer Special Funds Donor Recognition Donate to MoMM News Press Room Media Coverage Notes Newsletter Shop Browse Store Policies Privacy Policy NAMM History Founding Fathers Chandler W Smith 1901 Chandler W Smith a Boston piano dealer was the first president of the National Association of Piano Dealers of America What did a piano cost in 1901 That might depend on the customer because some dealers charged what the traffic would bear Fraudulent advertising was rampant To correct these evils the 10 year old American Piano Manufacturers Association invited reputable dealers to its 1901 convention in New York From that meeting grew the National Association of Piano Dealers of America NAPDA forerunner of today s National Association of Music Merchants NAMM NAPDA committee members met many times during the first year to tackle trade problems and organize the association s first convention Traveling as far as 2 500 miles by railroad to attend meetings they were successful at improving conditions nationwide Overview Gallery 1 Overview Popular Music Innovations

    Original URL path: http://www.museumofmakingmusic.org/gallery1/nammhistory (2016-02-18)
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  • Museum of Making Music - Gallery Sponsor
    employed by the Chicago Music Instrument Company to be in charge of the Maestro division where he became one of the first players to demonstrate the amplified clarinet He was also in charge of CMI s Reynold Band Instrument division In 1971 at the invitation of NAMM s Executive Vice President the legendary William R Gard Link joined NAMM and became head of the trade show division and was shortly thereafter promoted to Staff Vice President In 1977 he left NAMM to join Slingerland Deagan as President of this leading drum manufacturer Under his leadership the company flourished expanding their market and their product line He later served as Vice President of C G Conn Ltd Link rejoined NAMM in 1980 as Bill Gard s protégé taking over the helm as President CEO in 1981 upon Gard s retirement During Linkin s tenure NAMM expanded its membership and diversified its outreach to embrace manufacturers retailers wholesalers and distributors in the worldwide music products industry To reflect this enhanced direction the Association changed its name from the National Association of Music Merchants to NAMM International Music Products Association A much sought after performer Linkin retired from NAMM in May of 2001 to tour the world doing what he loves most making music with his clarinet His enthusiasm and positive energy helped encourage camaraderie within the industry and promoted the benefits of music making to the world These achievements along with receiving an Honorary Doctor of Music Education degree from Duquesne University and an Honorary Doctor of Music degree from the Berklee College of Music are evidence of Link s far reaching impact within the world of music and his undying passion for making music Gallery Donors Through the generosity of Link s friends and associates this gallery is named in his

    Original URL path: http://www.museumofmakingmusic.org/gallery1/sponsor (2016-02-18)
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  • Museum of Making Music - Popular Music
    Jazz Band Between 1910 and 1920 jazz and the syncopated beat of ragtime fueled the dance craze Women were cautioned that too much dancing would ruin their reputations but few listened Tin Pan Alley cranked out thousands of new popular tunes The demand for bands and orchestras to fill ballrooms across America led to better organized more professional groups and huge instrument sales Records and later the radio helped such bands as the Paul Whiteman Orchestra achieve national acclaim New Orleans with its black and white musical traditions gave birth to jazz Unlike the strict structures of ragtime jazz meant improvisation The New Orleans sound traveled up the Mississippi to such places as St Louis Missouri and Davenport Iowa eventually crossing over to Chicago In the Roaring Twenties white audiences flocked to Negro nightclubs in Chicago and New York to catch the latest jazz Castle Walk performed by James Reese Europe s Society Orchestra Alexander s Ragtime Band by Irving Berlin Over There by George M Cohan performed by Enrico Caruso Rock A Bye Your Baby with a Dixie Melody performed by Al Jolson Black and Tan Fantasy performed by Duke Ellington Orchestra Snake Rag performed by King Oliver s

    Original URL path: http://www.museumofmakingmusic.org/gallery2/popularmusic (2016-02-18)
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  • Museum of Making Music - Innovations
    News Press Room Media Coverage Notes Newsletter Shop Browse Store Policies Privacy Policy Innovations 1910 1929 The music products industry has produced many technical innovations over the years It has also been influenced by innovations created outside the industry Sample sounds of some key innovations from 1910 to 1929 Reproducing Piano American made version introduced in 1913 Theremin Developed by Russian scientist Léon Theremin in 1920 Gibson L 5 Guitar

    Original URL path: http://www.museumofmakingmusic.org/gallery2/innovations (2016-02-18)
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  • Museum of Making Music - Music Retail
    Privacy Policy Retail Sales on a High Note Small music dealer in upstate New York 1920 Unlike large full line stores many smaller merchants focused their inventory on popular talking machines and player pianos The success of department stores caught the attention of music retailers who opened full line stores stocked with everything musical They were rewarded with eager customers Booming sales encouraged music teachers and band leaders to open hundreds of smaller music stores in towns across America Articles in the trade press gave new dealers advice on accounting procedures marketing tactics and sales techniques Some retailers still worried that the new Parcel Post system encouraged too much competition from mail order houses Others were troubled by poorly written rental and installment contracts that sometimes led to lawsuits But for most there was little to dampen the effects of surging sales until the late 1920s Listening to the phonograph c 1910 The phonograph was a popular form of home entertainment both indoors and out Talking Machines Leading retailers installed listening booths with talking machines also called phonographs and gramophones so customers could hear the latest records For dealers who wanted the popular and lucrative Edison and RCA franchises comfortable

    Original URL path: http://www.museumofmakingmusic.org/gallery2/retail (2016-02-18)
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  • Museum of Making Music - Marketing
    WGY Radio Station Lyon Healy was one of the first retailers to use the radio for advertising The idea of marketing music cooperatively emerged in 1916 when twelve industry associations formed the Music Industries Chamber of Commerce Its goals were to foster and promote the development of music improve business practices in the industry and eliminate the excise tax on musical instruments The Piano Promotion Plan created by the National Piano Manufacturers Association in 1926 was another major marketing development To boost declining piano sales brought on by the popularity of the electric radio the association spent 200 000 to advertise in nine national magazines The plan met with limited success Instead of regarding the radio as a rival some music merchants put it to work as an ally for advertising The employees of J W Jenkins Sons Music Co in Wichita Kansas promoted their store by organizing a six piece orchestra to play over station WEAH in 1925 Tuning up with Music Education The national school band movement was the most important marketing development of the time Several associations and individuals helped in its development In 1917 The Music Trades Magazine editor John C Freund founded The Musical Alliance to lobby for music education in public schools The Music Educators National Conference MENC also actively encouraged school music programs during this period Lincoln Grammar School Band 1929 In 1923 C D Greenleaf owner of C G Conn vowed to make music a part of children s basic education He organized the first National Band Contests to draw attention to school music and established the Conn National School of Music in Chicago to train band directors He also commissioned studies on the benefits of music and obtained publicity for model school music programs with the help of famed conductor John

    Original URL path: http://www.museumofmakingmusic.org/gallery2/marketing (2016-02-18)
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