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  • Museum of Making Music - Distribution
    Newsletter Shop Browse Store Policies Privacy Policy Distribution A Taxing Enterprise George Bundy in Paris 1929 In 1918 George Bundy negotiated the exclusive distribution rights to sell Selmer wind instruments in the United States At the time most of the wind instruments and violins used in America were made by manufacturers in Germany and France Bundy is shown here with the Selmer brothers Henri right and Alexandre left President Woodrow Wilson cut import tariffs from 40 to 10 after his election in 1912 U S distributors who imported musical instruments from Europe made huge profits Their rapid rise in sales caught the attention of the U S Tariff Commission who undertook an early government sting operation The result was that eight leading importers were collectively fined 90 000 in unpaid tariffs World War I affected wholesalers in two ways musical instruments were taxed at 8 to help the war effort and the loss of German suppliers led some distributors to import violins from Japan for the first time As many piano retailers became full line merchants the number of distributors grew to meet the increasing demand for musical instruments and accessories Between 1920 and 1925 their ranks swelled from twenty

    Original URL path: http://www.museumofmakingmusic.org/gallery2/distribution (2016-02-18)
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  • Museum of Making Music - Manufacturing
    a Volunteer Special Funds Donor Recognition Donate to MoMM News Press Room Media Coverage Notes Newsletter Shop Browse Store Policies Privacy Policy Manufacturing Geared for Profit Interior of C F Martin Co factory 1925 The popularity of the ukulele encouraged C F Martin Co to produce the instruments in the 1920s Ukulele bodies ready for assembly are shown on the right of this photograph Martin gained a large share of the market which outsold their guitars two to one Musical instruments were among the first trademarked products sold in the U S An industry dispute between the American Piano Company and Knabe Sons helped create America s Trademark Law in 1912 Coal and wood shortages during World War I had a profound effect on the piano industry forcing manufacturers to cut production in half But as one manufacturer noted The strife of war has greatly enhanced the appreciation of music creating a robust trade After the war production moved into high gear to meet demand All segments of the industry prospered Although the postwar piano industry wrestled with the strongest labor unrest since the Chicago strikes of 1901 huge player piano sales made up for losses Then changing technology and

    Original URL path: http://www.museumofmakingmusic.org/gallery2/manufacturing (2016-02-18)
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  • Museum of Making Music - NAMM History
    Become a Volunteer Special Funds Donor Recognition Donate to MoMM News Press Room Media Coverage Notes Newsletter Shop Browse Store Policies Privacy Policy NAMM History Anchoring the Trade Chicago Coliseum c 1910 The 1911 Convention and Trade Exhibition was held at the Chicago Coliseum and was opened by President William Howard Taft The event drew an estimated 6 000 people who flocked to the exhibits to see the player piano demonstrations As a reflection of the times the National Association of Piano Merchants of America NAPMA called its 1916 gathering the Prosperity Convention Activities included the most popular entertainments of the time motion pictures an automobile ride for the ladies and dancing The convention and trade show were combined for the first time in 1918 In a patriotic gesture gate receipts were donated to buy instruments and music for the army and navy fighting in Europe NAPMA changed its name to the National Association of Music Merchants in 1919 Between 1910 and 1929 the association accomplishments included Establishing uniform trade practices Joining the Music Industry Chamber of Commerce Adopting a Code of Ethics to eliminate fraud Monitoring railroad freight rates for members Helping to eliminate the war excise tax on

    Original URL path: http://www.museumofmakingmusic.org/gallery2/nammhistory (2016-02-18)
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  • Museum of Making Music - Gallery Sponsor
    a successful candy manufacturer learned he was next in line to take over the family craft Already a U S citizen Avedis was reluctant to return to Turkey and only agreed to run the family business if he could stay in America A foundry was thus set up in Quincy MA where Avedis mastered every aspect of the detailed art of cymbal making under the guidance of his Uncle Aram Anxious to tap into the burgeoning swing music market Avedis hit the road in 1929 with his American made Zildjian cymbals Meetings with drummers such as Chick Webb Gene Krupa Buddy Rich and Jo Jones led him to create paper thin cymbals that produced a sharp brilliant tone Soon thereafter he introduced the innovative Hi Hat as well as large cymbals called Bounces or Rides that produced the distinctive pingy tones associated with modern jazz drumming Zildjian cymbals also helped shape the sounds of rock The massive popularity of rock n roll ushered in the need for medium and medium heavy weight cymbals that could cut through the roar of loud amplifiers Zildjian responded in the late 1960s by introducing its rock cymbals and New Beat Hi Hats for drummers looking for a bigger sound In 1977 Avedis passed his title of President to Armand Zildjian 1921 2002 his eldest son who had worked by his father s side for over 40 years During that time period Armand had become friends with many of the great jazz drummers and was a pioneer in the area of artist relations now standard practice in the music products industry A musician himself Armand continuously explored new sounds which set off a period of innovations in cymbal making He modernized production methods by reinvesting profits into customized equipment such as the rotary hearth oven

    Original URL path: http://www.museumofmakingmusic.org/gallery2/sponsor (2016-02-18)
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  • Museum of Making Music - Popular Music
    kid named Benny Goodman formed a band to bring real jazz back to the public On the last set of a disappointing cross country tour a frustrated Goodman told his sidemen to let it swing His audience at the Palomar Ballroom in Hollywood went wild ushering in the swing era and big bands Swing was a variation on the traditional Dixieland two beat staccato jazz style It had four smoothed out even beats to a measure Swing was pioneered by Fletcher Henderson who also created the five piece saxophone section the heart of the big band sound Big bands became big business The radio popularized them by broadcasting weekly performances from hotel ballrooms Millions tuned in to chase away Depression era blues Names like Duke Ellington Tommy and Jimmy Dorsey Lionel Hampton and Gene Krupa became household words Their fame encouraged thousands of young people to play an instrument King Porter Stomp performed by Benny Goodman Orchestra One O Clock Jump performed by Count Basie Orchestra A Tisket A Tasket performed by Ella Fitzgerald and the Chick Webb Orchestra I ll Never Smile Again performed by Frank Sinatra and the Tommy Dorsey Orchestra White Christmas by Irving Berlin performed by

    Original URL path: http://www.museumofmakingmusic.org/gallery3/popularmusic (2016-02-18)
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  • Museum of Making Music - Innovations
    Fieldtrips K 12 MusicVentures Title One Fieldtrips S T E A M Guitar Lab Families Kids Programs for Adults New Horizons Band North Coast Strings Outreach Partnerships Music Teachers Support Become a Member Become a Volunteer Special Funds Donor Recognition Donate to MoMM News Press Room Media Coverage Notes Newsletter Shop Browse Store Policies Privacy Policy Innovations 1930 1949 The music products industry has produced many technical innovations over the years It has also been influenced by innovations created outside the industry Sample sounds of some key innovations from 1910 to 1929 Rickenbacker Electro Hawaiian Guitar introduced in 1932 Martin D 28 Dreadnought Guitar introduced in 1934 music I Am A Pilgrim performed by David Grisman and Tony Rice Rickenbacker Electro Spanish Guitar introduced in 1935 first commercial solidbody guitar Hammond Organ introduced in 1935 Spinet Piano introduced by Haddorf Piano Company in 1935 Streamlined Accordion produced by several manufacturers c 1935 Gibson ES 150 Guitar introduced in 1936 Gibson s first commercial electric guitar Ludwig Speed King Bass Drum Pedal introduced in 1937 Bundy Resonite Model 1400 Clarinet introduced by Selmer in 1948 one of first commercially successful molded clarinets Overview Gallery 1 Gallery 2 Gallery 3 Overview Popular

    Original URL path: http://www.museumofmakingmusic.org/gallery3/innovations (2016-02-18)
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  • Museum of Making Music - Music Retail
    Band North Coast Strings Outreach Partnerships Music Teachers Support Become a Member Become a Volunteer Special Funds Donor Recognition Donate to MoMM News Press Room Media Coverage Notes Newsletter Shop Browse Store Policies Privacy Policy Retail Roller Coaster Ride Paige s Music in Terre Haute Indiana 1937 Easy credit vanished with the 1929 stock market crash Out of work customers had no cash and thousands of retailers declared bankruptcy Resourcefulness was the only way to beat the economic odds in the early 1930s Retailers diversified their inventory Jenkins Music Company of Kansas City turned their seven story building into a flea market where pianos harmonized with washing machines and lawn furniture Lyon Healy found that paintings of Mozart sold well and many dealers included free music lessons with the sale of inexpensive or used instruments World War II presented new problems for music retailers As war production cut availability of product dealers responded by rationing or only offering rentals of scarce big ticket items To create an instrument and record inventory they purchased used product After the war hundreds of returning GIs got into the music business Most had a background in music worked hard and gave large chain stores

    Original URL path: http://www.museumofmakingmusic.org/gallery3/retail (2016-02-18)
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  • Museum of Making Music - Marketing
    Privacy Policy Marketing Creative Marketing National Music Week Inauguration 1937 Clever sales and promotion techniques were industry hallmarks as manufacturers and retailers struggled to survive The Grinnell Brothers of Detroit pioneered one of the most novel concepts mass piano concerts that featured up to 300 pianos all played at once They later sold the instruments at a favorable price Accordion dealers were also ambitious They developed accordion bands and pushed the step up plan to encourage students to buy the next bigger sized instrument Aggressive door to door sales techniques coupled with new streamlined accordion styling boosted profits and the popularity of the instrument Guitars also became a focus for advertising during World War II because they were slightly more available on dealers shelves than war restricted brass instruments Retailers started giving guitar lessons and making use of aggressive radio advertising The new International Guitar League sparked interest in the guitar by promoting nationwide contests Music versus Delinquency was the theme of the League s 1945 convention Learning the Joys of Making Music Little Billy Barty with his Band 1930s Little Billy Barty s band had 35 members none of whom were over the age of six Baby orchestras sprung up in the 1930s to encourage parents to provide music lessons for their children Wanted Professional musician familiar with all instruments to establish youth band in West Frankfort Illinois Applicants should contact Sherman Alemanrode Manager C G Conn Musical Instrument Co C G Conn placed the above ad in Billboard magazine in 1930 Like other companies Conn promoted its instruments by sending salesmen into small towns to rent instruments to the parents of school children The rental fee was ten dollars Seven dollars was applied to the purchase price at the end of four weeks The students were promised a

    Original URL path: http://www.museumofmakingmusic.org/gallery3/marketing (2016-02-18)
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