archive-org.com » ORG » M » MUSEUMOFMAKINGMUSIC.ORG

Total: 419

Choose link from "Titles, links and description words view":

Or switch to "Titles and links view".
  • Museum of Making Music - Distribution
    Coverage Notes Newsletter Shop Browse Store Policies Privacy Policy Distribution The Times They Are A Changin UPS Trucks at West Music Company 1969 The advent of United Parcel Service UPS in the late 1960s meant that dealers no longer depended on large orders to get low freight rates Instead they could place smaller orders more often Large distributors with slow fill rates lost market share to more efficient competitors Dozens of established distributors handled product for American manufacturers in the early 1950s and played a key role in the music industry Distributors carried a wide variety of instruments gave liberal credit terms took small orders and advised young dealers on everything from store layout to promotional ideas Their road reps were generally friendly and helpful Then a booming market and changes in technology thinned the ranks United Postal Service UPS and Wide Area Telephone Service WATS lines accelerated processing and left some distributors in the dust Catalog houses and big volume retailers started buying direct from manufacturers Some manufacturers had grown so large they created their own cost effective distribution systems Many wholesalers were left with only accessories and some European imports The most ambitious such as MIDCO International St

    Original URL path: http://www.museumofmakingmusic.org/gallery4/distribution (2016-02-18)
    Open archived version from archive


  • Museum of Making Music - Manufacturing
    Special Funds Donor Recognition Donate to MoMM News Press Room Media Coverage Notes Newsletter Shop Browse Store Policies Privacy Policy Manufacturing Making Millions Making student flutes at Gemeinhardt Band recruitment programs greatly increased the size of bands and brought thousands of girls into the program many of whom chose to play the flute After the Korean War ended and the fear of price controls eased in 1953 industry sales skyrocketed Manufacturers provided financing to dealers in support of school band instrument rental programs which increased the volume of sales The effective marketing of new easy play chord organs pushed the wholesale organ business to 100 million in 1960 representing thirty five percent of total industry sales The volume also went to high on sales of electric guitars in response to rock and roll Twenty new makers of amplifiers entered the market between 1964 and 1966 Demand for guitars outpaced supply and foreign competition moved in from Japan Plant expansions and new factories sprouted in every branch of the industry Capacity doubled and tripled Profits followed Corporate giants went on acquisition sprees attracted by the huge profits of companies such as Chicago Musical Instruments CMI and others Conglomerate CBS led the

    Original URL path: http://www.museumofmakingmusic.org/gallery4/manufacturing (2016-02-18)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Museum of Making Music - NAMM History
    M Guitar Lab Families Kids Programs for Adults New Horizons Band North Coast Strings Outreach Partnerships Music Teachers Support Become a Member Become a Volunteer Special Funds Donor Recognition Donate to MoMM News Press Room Media Coverage Notes Newsletter Shop Browse Store Policies Privacy Policy NAMM History Beyond a Golden Anniversary NAMM celebrated its 50th Anniversary in 1951 having grown from 52 charter members to more than 1 500 A staff of seven headed by Executive Secretary William R Gard manned NAMM s headquarters in Chicago Their accomplishments included Group health insurance for members Annual Music in the Home features in House Beautiful Promotion of National Music Week Help for members with sales and income tax laws Creation of NAYMM for young music merchants Publication of everything from Business Forms for the Music Store to Riot Survival and Insurance for members Funding of the American Music Conference s AMC promotional film projects By the late 1960s almost half of the exhibitors at NAMM s trade shows were consumer electronic manufacturers making televisions and hi fi systems In 1968 it was mutually agreed that those exhibitors would start their own trade show Today music related electronics is again a major component

    Original URL path: http://www.museumofmakingmusic.org/gallery4/nammhistory (2016-02-18)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Museum of Making Music - Gallery Sponsor
    the founding president of the Board of Trustees of the Museum of Making Music With his charm wit integrity common sense and lifetime of unequaled experience he played a principle role in laying the foundation of this institution Henry Ziegler Steinway was born on August 23 1915 in New York City Although one might assume that Henry who is the great grandson of Henry Engelhard Steinway the founder of Steinway Sons would have been carefully groomed from an early age to enter the family business he actually was not And as to how it actually happened Henry himself explains I graduated from Harvard College in 1937 with a degree in History I had no particular talent or interest but thought maybe my old man will let me start in the piano business Henry spent the first years of his career as an apprentice in the Steinway factory yard the machine shop and various other departments This time spent with skilled workers made a tremendous impact on Henry and he has often said that working with them taught him more about the piano business than years of extra study could ever have accomplished By the time WWII hit Henry had become factory manager His career was put on hold in 1942 when he was drafted and assigned to work out of the Army s Counter Intelligence Corps headquarters on Governor s Island It was during this time that he met his wife Polly Knowlton Zinsser whom he married in 1944 After the war Henry returned to the family business and by 1955 had been appointed company president a position he retained until 1977 Even after Steinway Sons was no longer a family run business Henry remained active in the company In fact until shortly before his passing in 2008 he would

    Original URL path: http://www.museumofmakingmusic.org/gallery4/sponsor (2016-02-18)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Museum of Making Music - Popular Music
    Press Room Media Coverage Notes Newsletter Shop Browse Store Policies Privacy Policy Popular Music Rock Rolls in the Profits Eric Clapton playing acoustic guitar Eric Clapton s revived interest in playing acoustic guitar led to his legendary MTV Unplugged performance and subsequent Grammy Award winning recording His popularity helped revive acoustic guitar sales nationwide in the mid 1980s Rock and roll transformed itself into a corporate product in the 1970s With huge live tours and mass marketed promotional items the pop music industry made more money than ever It failed however to drive much in the way of musical instrument sales A new recording product cassette tapes blasted out of portable boom boxes and the Sony Walkman Compact Disc technology made vinyl records obsolete and rock videos born in 1981 with MTV s first broadcast became the most influential pop art form of the decade If nothing else rock was diverse Mellow harmonies of California Rock contrasted with the angry loud reaction of Punk and New Wave Progressive Rock put a synthesizer twist on classical motifs The aggressive guitar riffs of Heavy Metal competed with glittery Glamour rock soloists Black and Latino music too offered diverse styles Listeners were left

    Original URL path: http://www.museumofmakingmusic.org/gallery5/popularmusic (2016-02-18)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Museum of Making Music - Innovations
    Schools Educators Preschool Fieldtrips K 12 MusicVentures Title One Fieldtrips S T E A M Guitar Lab Families Kids Programs for Adults New Horizons Band North Coast Strings Outreach Partnerships Music Teachers Support Become a Member Become a Volunteer Special Funds Donor Recognition Donate to MoMM News Press Room Media Coverage Notes Newsletter Shop Browse Store Policies Privacy Policy Innovations 1970 1989 The music products industry has produced many technical innovations over the years It has also been influenced by innovations created outside the industry Sample sounds of some key innovations from 1970 to 1989 Linn LM 1 Drum machine 1979 Roland TR 808 Electronic drums 1980 ARP 2600 Monophonic analog synthesizer 1970 Minimoog Monophonic synthesizer 1971 E MU Emulator Digital sampling keyboard 1981 Sequential Circuits Prophet 5 Analog polyphonic synthesizer 1978 Yamaha CP 70 Electric grand piano 1983 Yamaha DX 7 Polyphonic synthesizer 1983 Roland D 50 Digital polyphonic synthesizer 1987 Korg M 1 Digital polyphonic workstation 1989 MIDI Controllers Roland MPU 401 MIDI Interface introduced in 1983 Roland GR 700 Guitar Synthesizer introduced in 1984 Live Electronic Orchestra LEO Don Lewis instrument that inspired MIDI 1974 Overview Gallery 1 Gallery 2 Gallery 3 Gallery 4 Gallery 5 Overview

    Original URL path: http://www.museumofmakingmusic.org/gallery5/innovations (2016-02-18)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Museum of Making Music - Music Retail
    Become a Volunteer Special Funds Donor Recognition Donate to MoMM News Press Room Media Coverage Notes Newsletter Shop Browse Store Policies Privacy Policy Retail Change is the Name of the Game Interior of Medley Music Corp 1970s Retailers specializing in combo instruments had to know their market well and keep prices low in the 1970s to stay competitive Shifting demographics and a volatile economy buffeted the retail music industry More combo shops opened in the early 1970s but declining guitar sales demanded diversification Price was the driving factor as music discount outlets appeared by the mid 1980s Home organ sales at mall stores sustained many dealers in the early 1970s Brian Majeski of The Music Trades Magazine recalled that at first mall locations were the place to be but with high occupancy costs and rising interest rates they quickly became the place to flee Freestanding buildings on well traveled roads proved a better choice Sales continued to fall Manufacturers with excess inventory favored large dealers and mail order operations with discount pricing Smaller dealers struggled with stiff competition a drop in school population high interest rates on rental contracts and a decline in school music programs Piano dealers also felt

    Original URL path: http://www.museumofmakingmusic.org/gallery5/retail (2016-02-18)
    Open archived version from archive

  • Museum of Making Music - Marketing
    Marketing Working in a New Area Piperette demonstration 1971 Hammond promoted sales of its easy play keyboard The Piper by hiring hundreds of college women to demonstrate the product in shopping malls across the country As musical instrument sales dropped and dealers were left with unwanted inventory in the 1970s and early 1980s new marketing strategies became the key to survival Price price price not advertising determined success in the new arena NAMM worked to promote music and instrument sales with its Discover Music campaign in the early 1970s and by organizing National Marketing Clinics for retailers Manufacturers bought television air time and continued to run band clinics and workshops with celebrity endorsers They also wooed dealers with fancy incentive trips to Europe Africa South America and the Bahamas all based on sales Retailers ran big piano theme promotions often tied to a community event They took instruments to fairs and enticed buyers with new demonstration techniques for easy play organs The industry received numerous wake up calls Mass merchants like K Mart offered rock bottom prices for Casio s first portable keyboards and sold thousands Retailers who initially boycotted Casio had to take a closer look at new technology and accept shorter margins Support School Music Benny Goodman 1972 Benny Goodman worked to save music education in the Chicago public schools Taxpayer revolts budget cuts and a decline in school populations eliminated many school music programs in the 1970s and 1980s The music industry worked to reverse the trend The most dramatic battle was waged in 1972 to save music programs in the Chicago public schools Spearheaded by the American Music Conference AMC the effort involved a large coalition of music related groups and well known musicians Although successful in Chicago the industry watched helplessly as music programs vanished

    Original URL path: http://www.museumofmakingmusic.org/gallery5/marketing (2016-02-18)
    Open archived version from archive



  •